1. Harsh Tongya's Avatar
    I bought a external battery power bank from Xiaomi or MI which is rated to output 5.1 Volt.
    the original bb charger is 5V and so are most other chargers. some tablet chargers are rated 5.1V. motorola phone chargers also output 5.1V.

    after using that power bank, i have had some problems with my device. i have a BB Z10 STL100-1 (3G version).

    I searched if 5.1 V chargers were ok to use. couldnt find anything related to BB 10 phones but people had said a +-5% was okay and nothing to worry about.

    well for Z10 they are wrong. In a short usage span maybe 20 hours, this has corrupted my software casuing problems like wifi toggles sticking not shutting off.
    OS corruption, and once causing my phone not to turn on (on the first time of use itself, the booting sequence comes up and fills up, but doesnt show percentage on tapping screen), apps not opening etc. i think it is also making the phones battery to swell.

    i think all the posts of people facing issues like bricked phones etc, may be mostly caused by using chargers of different Voltage.

    the extra 0.1 V seems to be frying up the circuit board, so if you care about your phone.(well you must, if you are on this forum)
    then please read the output voltage it should be 5V nothing more nothing less, best to stick to original charger. The amperage doesnt matter, your phone takes in only what it can handle but Voltage is free like a thought to funk up the phone.

    I just hope this hasnt caused any hardware damage.

    if any of you have knowledge about electronics please do tell me.

    i have also used this charger on my old 9700, that thing is a tank. i use it now as a music player. So the battery on it used to sometimes die before hitting zero, old battery.
    this charger seems to have rejuvenated it, so maybe this should help with Z10 battery too or any other lithium battery for matter.
    but do this on your own risk and try to do it ouside the phone with maybe a external battery charger.
    If you can only do it on the phone do it maybe once or twice. shouldnt be a problem, i think. But do it on your own risk and try do it before a updating your OS, so you wont have any corruption issues. and DO A BACKUP!!

    my first post and its got a bit long but just felt i needed to get this out to you guys.
    09-17-14 03:54 AM
  2. Sebastian Maier1's Avatar
    maybe your 5.1V charger is broken but 5.1V won't damage your phone. There is an IC for providing the battery with the Voltage it needs and protecting it from too high voltages and overcharging and these normally have a way higher input range (even 7V should do nothing to your phone). What can be a problem are car chargers though, especially the cheap ones.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by zocster; 09-17-14 at 10:51 PM.
    jpvj and si001 like this.
    09-17-14 05:53 AM
  3. Harsh Tongya's Avatar
    there is nothing on a phone that can change the voltage of current you putting in. what it can do at most is regulate ampere.

    try connecting a 7V charger to your phone, and hope it shuts off immediately. if it doesnt then congratulations you now are a unregistered pyrotechnic.
    09-17-14 06:19 AM
  4. backfire101's Avatar
    of course there is a voltage regulation unit in every phone. core components use less then the 5V you put in. The battery alone is rated at 3,7V.
    09-17-14 06:44 AM
  5. SaurabhIb's Avatar
    I bought a external battery power bank from Xiaomi or MI which is rated to output 5.1 Volt.
    the original bb charger is 5V and so are most other chargers. some tablet chargers are rated 5.1V. motorola phone chargers also output 5.1V.

    after using that power bank, i have had some problems with my device. i have a BB Z10 STL100-1 (3G version).

    I searched if 5.1 V chargers were ok to use. couldnt find anything related to BB 10 phones but people had said a +-5% was okay and nothing to worry about.

    well for Z10 they are wrong. In a short usage span maybe 20 hours, this has corrupted my software casuing problems like wifi toggles sticking not shutting off.
    OS corruption, and once causing my phone not to turn on (on the first time of use itself, the booting sequence comes up and fills up, but doesnt show percentage on tapping screen), apps not opening etc. i think it is also making the phones battery to swell.

    i think all the posts of people facing issues like bricked phones etc, may be mostly caused by using chargers of different Voltage.

    the extra 0.1 V seems to be frying up the circuit board, so if you care about your phone.(well you must, if you are on this forum)
    then please read the output voltage it should be 5V nothing more nothing less, best to stick to original charger. The amperage doesnt matter, your phone takes in only what it can handle but Voltage is free like a thought to funk up the phone.

    I just hope this hasnt caused any hardware damage.

    if any of you have knowledge about electronics please do tell me.

    i have also used this charger on my old 9700, that thing is a tank. i use it now as a music player. So the battery on it used to sometimes die before hitting zero, old battery.
    this charger seems to have rejuvenated it, so maybe this should help with Z10 battery too or any other lithium battery for matter.
    but do this on your own risk and try to do it ouside the phone with maybe a external battery charger.
    If you can only do it on the phone do it maybe once or twice. shouldnt be a problem, i think. But do it on your own risk and try do it before a updating your OS, so you wont have any corruption issues. and DO A BACKUP!!

    my first post and its got a bit long but just felt i needed to get this out to you guys.
    What in the case of car chargers
    09-17-14 06:49 AM
  6. misterabrasive's Avatar
    It's not the voltage, it's the amperage ! 1.8 amps is great. BlackBerry Premium Chargers both home and car are the best thing to use on your OS 10 device.

    Posted with my Z10 on Verizon 10.2.1.3253
    09-17-14 06:09 PM
  7. si001's Avatar
    5.1v should be just fine. What is the amperage of your charger?
    09-17-14 08:25 PM
  8. Sporatic's Avatar
    It's not the voltage, it's the amperage ! 1.8 amps is great. BlackBerry Premium Chargers both home and car are the best thing to use on your OS 10 device.

    Posted with my Z10 on Verizon 10.2.1.3253
    Amperage isn't pushed from the charger it's pulled from the device. If a device draws 1amp it will draw 1amp regardless of if it's connected to a 1amp, 2amp or 10amp charger.
    marknmel and Harsh Tongya like this.
    09-17-14 08:36 PM
  9. AnimalPak200's Avatar
    LOL... if you connect a 12 V directly to your BB10 microusb port, you will experience negative consequences.

    As the poster above said, current rating relates to the maximum current that the charger can supply,.. the charger will supply less if the device requires less, but connect a device that draws a higher current than the charger's current rating and it will eventually (or quickly) fry the charger.

    However, the open circuit voltage of the charger will remain the same (within a tolerance), regardless of the device being hooked up to it. Meaning that if you hook-up a device rated for 5V to a 12V charger, it will most likely destroy the device's voltage regulator IC. How much higher a voltage the device can withstand (not to be confused with "Use") depends on the tolerance of the voltage regulator chip.

    Why anyone would make a 5.1V "usb" charger is another story,.. one that probably needs to be told in Chinese.

    Posted via CB10
    09-17-14 08:48 PM
  10. JerBru's Avatar
    .1 volts will not damage anything. There is an acceptable range. 7volts is fine.
    Amps is another issue.
    A higher amp rating will provide more current, charge a battery faster AND Cause over heating which is not a good thing.

    Do not mix chemistries.
    Lithium Ion (cell phone) , nicads, and car batteries (lead acid) are different chemistries and require different charging circuits that are NOT interchangeable.

    OP
    Your charger is defective in some weird way. Devices do not run from a charger.


    Posted by Jerbru
    09-17-14 09:17 PM
  11. Sporatic's Avatar
    .1 volts will not damage anything. There is an acceptable range. 7volts is fine.
    Amps is another issue.
    A higher amp rating will provide more current, charge a battery faster AND Cause over heating which is not a good thing.

    Do not mix chemistries.
    Lithium Ion (cell phone) , nicads, and car batteries (lead acid) are different chemistries and require different charging circuits that are NOT interchangeable.

    OP
    Your charger is defective in some weird way. Devices do not run from a charger.


    Posted by Jerbru
    No. Once again, amperage is not pushed. A 10amp charger will safety supply UP TO 10AMP before being overwhelmed and burning out. When it comes to current the charger sits there and waits for the device to pull it. If it asks for 2amps, it provides 2amp. If it asks for 10 it provides 10. If it asks for 20, it provides 20 until it overheats and burns out unless a fuse or circuit breaker is tripped. It's why your car battery can supply power for something small like the small led lights in your dash and the starter itself.

    Try it yourself. Get a tiny 12v led light bulb and put it on a car battery. It will light up and stay lit with no issues. Put a 12v radio on the battery, still no issues. Now put a wrench across the two terminals..... But I wouldn't.
    marknmel and AnimalPak200 like this.
    09-17-14 09:44 PM
  12. AnimalPak200's Avatar
    .1 volts will not damage anything. There is an acceptable range. 7volts is fine.
    Amps is another issue.
    A higher amp rating will provide more current, charge a battery faster AND Cause over heating which is not a good thing.

    Do not mix chemistries.
    Lithium Ion (cell phone) , nicads, and car batteries (lead acid) are different chemistries and require different charging circuits that are NOT interchangeable.

    OP
    Your charger is defective in some weird way. Devices do not run from a charger.


    Posted by Jerbru
    LOL...amazingly wrong, but if you guys keep repeating it I'm sure physics will start to bend your way......... good luck.

    Posted via CB10
    09-17-14 10:50 PM
  13. djsvet's Avatar
    There is lots of no sense in this thread. First of all, how do you know your 5.1v charger was actually outputing 5.1v and not 8v?

    Second, 0.1v will not be any harm to any modern phone. Also, there is [almost] always a voltage drop under load. Your charger might be rated 5.1v without load which would explain it all.
    Of course your phone has a [many] voltage regulator. The CPU probably needs less than 1.2v, battery needs 4.3volts max, how do you think that is supplied. The power circuit will have its limitation which means 12vdc might damage it, but even 6V might be ok.

    Some ppl mentioned that current flows as re quested - that is correct. The load determines the current. The supply determines the voltage and the MAXIMUM current it can flow through it safely.

    Also lots of you are concerned with the charging amps - Lion batteries should be safe to take 1C (1 time the capacity) charging/discharging load, unless the package is extremely tight which would cause the battery to overheat quicker.

    LiPo goes even further - I have batteries rated 3C - 5 amp hours battery takes safe continues charge/discharge of 15 amps.


    Posted via CB10
    si001 likes this.
    09-17-14 10:52 PM
  14. Mangelhaft's Avatar
    From an Electronic Engineering point of view:

    Currant (amerage) is pulled: the load (be it a phone, light bulb, electric motor, etc.) draws the current. The power source, battery, wall outlet, generator/alternator, etc, supplies the current. If the current demand is higher (IE two 10 AMP vacuum cleaners on a 15 AMP house circuit, three 20 AMP auto amplifiers on a 40 AMP circuit) the power source, conductors, and/or interconnects could melt, short, arc, or catch fire. This is why electric circuits have fuses or circuit breakers. These devices are to protect the current supplier from overload states, preventing catastrophic failure (damage), including fire. A direct short is akin to a near infinite current draw. This is why fuses blow, circuit breakers trip, or batteries explode.

    Voltage is the difference in electric potential between two points in an electric circuit. Attempting to draw current from a lower voltage source can cause a brown-out effect: locked motors, erratic electronic function, failure to power-up, etc. Drawing from a higher voltage source will usually cause catastrophic damage, unless an over-voltage device or circuitry is used.

    Automobile (12V DC) power supplies (car chargers, in this case) and home power supplies (commonly called power bricks) perform basically the same functions: They convert one voltage (12V DC, 120V AC, or 240V AC) to 5V DC, in the case of my official BlackBerry charger. Whether the power source is 12V or 120V, the function is the same, but accomplished electrically different.

    Quality power supplies have over-current and short circuit protection, either an auto resetting circuit breaker or a fuse, and voltage regulating circuitry.

    Voltage regulator Integrated Circuits (ICs) and/or circuitry usually have internal short circuit protection and brown-out protection. They use hundreds of components etched on the chip to output a precise voltage over a specific and varied range of input voltage, with a maximum current rating: The LM7805C Voltage Regulator IC will output 5V DC, at a maximum of 1 AMP, from a 7V DC to 35V DC input.

    Power supply output voltage is usually one of the many common voltage requirements. The devices powered (BlackBerry phones) usually have specific power requirements and, therefore, have their own voltage regulation circuitry for powering the various subcomponents of the device, including the charging circuit.

    Different battery types have different charging requirements (as well as draw specifications). The same circuit used to charge an automobile's lead-acid battery would destroy a lithium-ion battery pack, even if the output voltage were corrected. These requirements include maximum charging voltage, charging rate, as well as maximum and minimum temperature. Most rechargeable devices, including those containing removable batteries, have charging circuits designed to monitor the battery's temperature, charge rate, and charge level, and will disrupt charging if any of these specifications is out of range to protect the battery. Charging will resume when all specifications return to their specific ranges.

    Cheap power supplies lack circuit protection and use low-cost, low quality components for unregulated, unfiltered voltage drop. Either resistors are used to drop 12V DC to 5V DC, for car chargers, or a basic transformer to drop 120V AC or 240V AC to 7V AC and diodes to convert the AC to DC (and cause the last bit of voltage drop). This is why cheap power supplies and car chargers should be avoided.

    Automobile electrical systems are very noisy and have many voltage spikes and fluctuations. This is why cheap chargers will destroy many precision devices and their respective devices. These voltage characteristics can also damage cheap chargers, which do not have their own circuit protections, and cause them to output higher voltages. 14.4V DC, the electrical voltage of a running vehicle, would not be a good thing to introduce into a device that is designed for standard USB voltage, 4.8V DC to 5.2V DC.

    Any energy conversion, voltage -> voltage (voltage drop and/or regulation), electrical -> mechanical (motors), electrical -> chemical (charging battery), is inefficient. The byproduct of this inefficiency is usually heat. The greater the speed of conversion, the greater amount of heat produced. When charging a phone, most of the heat is produced by the voltage regulating and charge circuitry. When using the phone (not charging), the heat is the result of the voltage regulating circuitry, and the resistance of the ICs performing their functions.

    See:
    Current: Electric current - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Voltage: Voltage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Voltage Regulator: Voltage regulator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    09-18-14 01:06 AM
  15. gariac's Avatar
    Just a quick FYI. "Brown-out" is called under voltage lockout.

    Apple USB chargers are 5.1 volts. Apple violates the USB standard for power supply current capability reporting. The USB standard is to place a resistor on the data lines to indicate power supply capability. Apple places voltages on the data lines to indicate current capability. I can't see why this would be a problem, well other than the phone charging at the default 0.5Amp level. But I would never put an Apple charger on anything but an Apple device.

    And I don't own anything Apple!


    Posted via CB10
    Mangelhaft likes this.
    09-19-14 07:20 PM
  16. Harsh Tongya's Avatar
    5.1v should be just fine. What is the amperage of your charger?
    has been rated to provide 2.1 amp output.
    so it can charge tablets.
    09-20-14 03:27 PM
  17. Harsh Tongya's Avatar
    thank you guys for all the information and unanimously deciding 0.1V shouldnt be a problem, i think ill keep it.

    but just to be safe i would try to not use the phone while its plugged in. Previously i was playing a game on it, maybe that caused it.
    09-20-14 03:39 PM
  18. BBPandy's Avatar
    All the phone manufacturers recommend against using 3rd party battery packs & chargers. The reason being that although some brands are good, there's also a lot of cheap ones out there that don't output what they claim. Unfortunately this means that there's a lot of people out there who have damaged or destroyed their mobile devices this way

    Posted via CB10
    09-21-14 09:58 AM
  19. MB64's Avatar
    Just a quick FYI. "Brown-out" is called under voltage lockout.

    Apple USB chargers are 5.1 volts. Apple violates the USB standard for power supply current capability reporting. The USB standard is to place a resistor on the data lines to indicate power supply capability. Apple places voltages on the data lines to indicate current capability. I can't see why this would be a problem, well other than the phone charging at the default 0.5Amp level. But I would never put an Apple charger on anything but an Apple device.

    And I don't own anything Apple!


    Posted via CB10
    Lol, not that you COULD charge anything else with their equipment since they are so special that they need there own special design....

    Posted via CB10 with my Z30
    09-21-14 10:08 AM
  20. CarbonKevin's Avatar
    I think it's more likely an issue with the quality of power being supplied causing data corruption. Even a reputable power supply could be operating outside of the normal ratings.

    Remember, the things printed on the side of an adapter are in no way a reflection of what's actually happening at a given moment.

    Posted via CB10
    09-21-14 10:50 AM

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