07-20-13 03:25 PM
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  1. newcollector's Avatar
    I believe, within the R.Vikams principles you'll find the product definition step. My purpose points out that this particular step is brillant. What you fairly report hasn't IMHO simply happened yet. What we have seen yet (especially in U.S.A) is kind of "B plan" to occupy the space, not the "full monty", far from it.
    I'm glad I've read the word "lattitude" above, this is exactly what I had in mind.

    Posted via CB10
    As someone who wants BBRY to return to at least some of its glory days in its new reimangined glory, the disagreement about marketing has more to do with timely execution. It seems BBRY is now going to push their marketing in ways they have not yet. Many feel that the marketing push should have started at the very beginning. Not only advertisements that creatively show features and benefits, but also the kind of point of sale marketing that effectively promotes product to the consumer...actual carrier and salesperson cooperation.

    I did notice in my local ATT store a small sign for the BBRY Z and Q10 models. The problem is that the Samsung signage for the S4 was about 4 times the size. Thankfully, my salesperson sports a Z10, so I was in good hands (plus I email him with CrackBerry information and links so that he can be more aware of what is happening).

    BlackBerry is not dead and it needs to trumpet that fact to alter the perception of people in the USA. It is not the old buggy and complicated OS that it used to be. It is easy to use, fast and the best is yet to come (hopefully) and time will tell if BlackBerry is making the right decisions. Hang on, it is gonna be one wild ride!!
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    07-17-13 01:34 PM
  2. ColdFistOfTruth's Avatar
    The problem is, as others have highlighted, not just marketing.

    BBRY is fighting battles on several fronts:

    • Handset design
    • OS/platform development
    • Ecosystem development


    Compare their successful competitors:

    Apple

    Apple builds the whole widget. They design the handset. They build the OS. (iOS) They build the ecosystem (iTunes, iCloud). But they have hugely deep pockets and other synergetic businesses.

    Microsoft

    Microsoft doesn't do handset development (yet). They build the OS. (WP8) They build the ecosystem (Office 365, SkyDrive). And they have hugely deep pocket and quite a few other business units that support the company as a whole.

    Google

    Google does limited handset design. They build the OS. (Android). They build the ecosystem (GMail, Google+, Google Apps, Google Play). They have hugely deep pockets.

    Samsung

    Samsung designs its own handsets. It doesn't have to build the OS. It builds a limited ecosystem, but can leverage Google's. They have a lot of other business units and deep pockets.

    When you look at those competitors and realize BBRY has to fight a fight on ALL the fronts and that only ONE of the competitors is successful doing that (the rest don't have to), it casts a pretty tough shadow on the light of success.

    THIS is the biggest risk to BBRY to me. And the unique "advantages" like physical keyboards and BES installed base (mostly in the BBOS world) are simply not powerful enough to be considered as contributing substantially in the overall fight.

    It's OK to have love for the company (or better, the products). But it's borderline irrational in the light of the currently-available information to expect a profound recovery.


    -CFOT
    cgk and aniym like this.
    07-17-13 02:00 PM
  3. rbrar03's Avatar
    If the company goes private there is normally a pay out to share holders. Hienz ketchup went private.

    Posted via CB10
    07-18-13 12:17 AM
  4. sosumi11's Avatar
    BlackBerry is not dead and it needs to trumpet that fact to alter the perception of people in the USA. It is not the old buggy and complicated OS that it used to be. It is easy to use, fast and the best is yet to come (hopefully) and time will tell if BlackBerry is making the right decisions. Hang on, it is gonna be one wild ride!!
    Advertising copy does not alter a person's decision about a product (unless it's a commodity product like toilet paper, which price and a clever ad are usually the deciding factors).

    It either reinforces an after sale decision, or the ad is simply ignored. Sure, it can produce awareness, but that awareness is only significant if the consumer is listening. Most ads are ignored unless there is a personal interest in the specific product. Many people have already made their decision on a product (or at least narrowed it down) before they have seen any ad!

    People make purchasing big ticket, life style items decisions by researching! Not by who produces the best or most ads!

    I wish developing great products was as easy as writing a check. If that were the case, then Microsoft would have great products.
    Steve Jobs, 2007 Shareholders’ Meeting, 10 May 2007
    07-18-13 10:41 AM
  5. Marc_Paradise's Avatar
    Advertising copy does not alter a person's decision about a product (unless it's a commodity product like toilet paper, which price and a clever ad are usually the deciding factors).

    It either reinforces an after sale decision, or the ad is simply ignored. Sure, it can produce awareness, but that awareness is only significant if the consumer is listening. Most ads are ignored unless there is a personal interest in the specific product. Many people have already made their decision on a product (or at least narrowed it down) before they have seen any ad!

    People make purchasing big ticket, life style items decisions by researching! Not by who produces the best or most ads!
    Advertising isn't about selling, for the most part - it's about raising awareness.

    If someone is flooded with iphone and samsung commercials from both carriers and manufacturers... that is what they have in mind when they go to buy a phone. Those one or two BB commercials that don't stand out - for good or ill - won't leave an impression.

    And whether this is a big-ticket item is up for debate - with carrier "discounts" it seems like a much more minor purchase than it is.

    So it would be more accurate to say advertising does not *directly* sell a product, but it does influence it significantly in ways that most people are actually quite unaware of. (Note: Not looking for anecdotal "not me!" here - it's been shown that the majority of people are influenced in terms of brand awareness and, indirectly, purchasing decisions. )

    So yes - if BBRY wants to become relevant, to regain critical brand awareness as a reinvigorated product, they *do* need to flood every advertising channel they can think of.

    If they want to remain a niche manufacturer or exit the handset business, then they can carry on as they're doing now.
    Last edited by Marc_Paradise; 07-18-13 at 12:55 PM. Reason: typos
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    07-18-13 12:26 PM
  6. exiledcanadian's Avatar
    I think TH and the BBRY board are content to being a niche player as long as they make enough money to satisfy shareholders. They know there is no way in a million years that they will ever get back to the top when three tech giants (Apple, Google and Microsoft) stand in the way and have much more in terms of resources to do product development and marketing. If BBRY can turn a profit, they'll stay alive. That's all they want.

    Look at Nortel. Many folks thought they would come back because they had great and innovative products (and they did!). People held on to those dollar shares until the very end and wound up losing a ton after getting in at $5, $10, $20, $30, or $50. Nortel was once worth over $100/share so surely, they would come back!!! Problem is that many shareholders were emotionally invested in a Canadian stock that was once considered the leader. Cisco and Alcatel/Lucent grabbed market share away because they had more resources, and more effective marketing even before the numbers started being cooked at Nortel.

    Invest with your head, not your heart. If you get emotional about the value of a company, the stock market is the last place you should be.
    m1a1mg and 454vette like this.
    07-20-13 03:25 PM
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