1. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Some tech companies are leaving their customers vulnerable to large-scale hacking scandals. Apple has yet to come out with a public statement, although it's probably fair to assume that soon everything will return 'to normal' as we've seen numerous times before. Unfortunately they have this luxury which most other companies do not have and that's just the way it is. Anyway, the purpose of this thread was not express my dissatisfaction over Apple not being held accountable.

    What I would prefer in these situations is have BlackBerry take a more aggresive approach. Either you partner with these more vulnerable players in one way or another (provide a secure connection to the iCloud) or you AT LEAST make a public appearance on any well-known TV channel to promote your company. I have to admit, their new 'marketing approach' using Inside BlackBerry Blog and BlackBerry Fact Check helps but the audience is too limited to make a difference. Especially when an opportunity like yesterday's presents itself. And it's yours for the taking!
    notafanboy likes this.
    09-02-14 10:13 AM
  2. diegonei's Avatar
    Let's try a different scenario to illustrate why i think BlackBerry is right to keep away from this for the time being.

    50 people die in a bus crash. Competing bus company advertises: "Ours don't crash so often".

    When the dust settles, the perpetrator is punished and the celebrities feel less violated, then yeah, they can push the security talk further. But it's too soon.

    You try to profit from people's pain, you end up leaving very sour tastes in everyone's mouths.
    Laura Knotek and MikeX74 like this.
    09-02-14 10:25 AM
  3. THBW's Avatar
    Let's try a different scenario to illustrate why i think BlackBerry is right to keep away from this for the time being.

    50 people die in a bus crash. Competing bus company advertises: "Ours don't crash so often".

    When the dust settles, the perpetrator is punished and the celebrities feel less violated, then yeah, they can push the security talk further. But it's too soon.

    You try to profit from people's pain, you end up leaving very sour tastes in everyone's mouths.
    I partially agree. The damage to Apple has been done. The solution has been presented by third parties (i.e. buy BlackBerry). Some will listen, some will not. But every time it's a few more customers heading BlackBerry's way. Perhaps, in a few days, just before Apple's launch, John Chen does an interview to highlight what separates Apple from BlackBerry. Nice way of getting a pointed jab on the competition to deflate their big day a bit.

    Posted via CB10
    09-02-14 08:38 PM
  4. sosumi11's Avatar
    Some tech companies are leaving their customers vulnerable to large-scale hacking scandals. Apple has yet to come out with a public statement, although it's probably fair to assume that soon everything will return 'to normal' as we've seen numerous times before. Unfortunately they have this luxury which most other companies do not have and that's just the way it is. Anyway, the purpose of this thread was not express my dissatisfaction over Apple not being held accountable.
    Apple did make a public statement. Apple was not hacked. The celebrities' accounts were. These people were targeted (it didn't matter what device they used). Apple was still held accountable even for celebrities that don't even own an Apple product.

    Update to Celebrity Photo Investigation

    We wanted to provide an update to our investigation into the theft of photos of certain celebrities. When we learned of the theft, we were outraged and immediately mobilized Apple’s engineers to discover the source. Our customers’ privacy and security are of utmost importance to us. After more than 40 hours of investigation, we have discovered that certain celebrity accounts were compromised by a very targeted attack on user names, passwords and security questions, a practice that has become all too common on the Internet. None of the cases we have investigated has resulted from any breach in any of Apple’s systems including iCloud or Find my iPhone. We are continuing to work with law enforcement to help identify the criminals involved.

    To protect against this type of attack, we advise all users to always use a strong password and enable two-step verification. Both of these are addressed on our website at Apple ID: Security and your Apple ID.
    Apple just signed deals with all the major credit card companies. These companies do not take security lightly.

    Meanwhile, BlackBerry is still trying to win enterprise. As if that matters today.
    09-07-14 11:37 PM
  5. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Apple did make a public statement. Apple was not hacked. The celebrities' accounts were. These people were targeted (it didn't matter what device they used). Apple was still held accountable even for celebrities that don't even own an Apple product.



    Apple just signed deals with all the major credit card companies. These companies do not take security lightly.

    Meanwhile, BlackBerry is still trying to win enterprise. As if that matters today.
    My my...sensitive are we? Apple allowed unlimited login attempts...thus permitting the brute force attack...that is a ridiculously stupid "security" over site don't you think?
    Also, the only reason Apple put NFC in their antique device is due to all transactions being REQUIRED to be chip/pin enabled next year...that order is from the security conscious banks...
    Not Apple.

    Eazzy Peazzy
    _dimi_ likes this.
    09-08-14 05:11 AM
  6. kg4icg's Avatar
    Also Apple out of necessity updated there servers after the hack in a oops moment that will come back and bite them in the behind, going out in public and saying that it wasn't there systems that was responsible. That is just like Steve Jobs coming out and telling people they are holding there phones wrong as a result of a bad antenna design on the iphone 3.
    Shanerredflag and _dimi_ like this.
    09-08-14 09:53 AM
  7. anon(8865116)'s Avatar
    My my...sensitive are we? Apple allowed unlimited login attempts...thus permitting the brute force attack...that is a ridiculously stupid "security" over site don't you think?
    Also, the only reason Apple put NFC in their antique device is due to all transactions being REQUIRED to be chip/pin enabled next year...that order is from the security conscious banks...
    Not Apple.

    Eazzy Peazzy
    Unfortunately, most companies don't suffer that hard when data breaches happen, especially Apple. People tend to turn a blind eye to things they don't want to believe. Unfortunately, if it were to happen to BB you can guarantee customers would freak out.

    Apple has way too much power when it comes to PR and marketing... even android is envious

    Honestly, it's one of the reasons I want a blackberry now. There are way too many people in the USA who believe Apple's sh** doesn't stink, and unfortunately, it seems like that belief is spreading to other countries. I have an iPhone and my dad is a huge apple investor. I can't get away from it >_<
    Shanerredflag likes this.
    09-08-14 03:03 PM
  8. onlybuggin's Avatar
    This is an opportunity for BlackBerry that should be exploited. However, if done incorrectly, BlackBerry stands to lose more than it gains; sounding more like a sore loser rather than a knowledgeable expert. Being the sore loser makes BlackBerry a target of ridicule but being a knowledgeable proven expert positions them as a wanted resource. It's a very fine line separating the two. BlackBerry needs to ensure that the security issue stays front and center without appearing to be the one screaming about but being the one offering a true and real solution.

    You need only look to any one of the 'experts' featured the major networks' news shows to find 'experts' that have interesting experiences that make them 'experts'. BlackBerry's marketing department needs to fill in this gap to fully exploit this opportunity.

    Posted via CB10
    MikeX74 and Shanerredflag like this.
    09-08-14 03:41 PM
  9. BBNation's Avatar
    Forget talking, I sent email to find our more about bbm protect a potential purchase and yet they have responded. it has been more than month. If they want to sell why would not respond


    Posted via CB10
    09-08-14 11:09 PM
  10. sosumi11's Avatar
    My my...sensitive are we? Apple allowed unlimited login attempts...thus permitting the brute force attack...that is a ridiculously stupid "security" over site don't you think?
    Actually it wasn't brute force. If you lose your iCloud password, you just need three things:
    1. Account email address
    2. Date of Birth
    3. Answer 2 of 3 security questions correctly.

    Celebrities (and most people) put the obvious answers to these questions (City of Birth, Favorite Pet, Mother's Maiden, etc) These people target celebrities and buy/sell these photos within their massive ring. What happened was someone in the ring released images to the public.

    Apple did not put this in consideration because iCloud is only used to store images and media. Not critical financial data, access to computer, etc.

    Also, the only reason Apple put NFC in their antique device is due to all transactions being REQUIRED to be chip/pin enabled next year...that order is from the security conscious banks...
    Not Apple.
    How about making financial transactions simpler without the fear of leaving your card on a restaurant table, or a cashier writing down your number, name and security code from the card you just handed to them? Plus verification by either PIN or Touch ID is required. The transaction data doesn't even go thru Apple. Only your device, bank and retailer exchange the data.

    Granted its the same process Europe uses with the embedded chip in the card, it just eliminates the need to carry a physical card. Touch ID is what sold the credit card people.
    09-12-14 12:14 AM
  11. jsmall999's Avatar
    Canada has been using chip cards for years as well

    US is just very slow on picking up new retail tech, personally I thought it was always due to the fragmented banking sector...

    Posted via CB10
    Shanerredflag likes this.
    09-12-14 07:21 AM
  12. tmf06's Avatar
    Apple did not put this in consideration because iCloud is only used to store images and media. Not critical financial data, access to computer, etc.
    It looks like they forgot to mention that in their documentation...

    http://www.apple.com/icloud/

    Posted via CB10
    Shanerredflag likes this.
    09-12-14 07:46 AM

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