View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

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1110. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    694 62.52%
  • No

    416 37.48%
  1. sparkaction's Avatar
    Synology NAS. No PC necessary.

    http://www.synology.com/dsm/index.php?lang=us

    Leading consumer NAS solution does almost everything for a little over $200. That recently started adding support for Windows phone, chances are they're also considering BB10. I wrote them about supporting it.
    Are you using Android ports for access or via the Web interface?

    Posted via CB10
    04-27-13 02:55 PM
  2. CDM76's Avatar
    Yeah, I'm looking for a way outside the cloud or drop box to consolidate my files without having a computer or laptop on at the house. In fact, my computer is boxed up and I don't leave the laptop running when not in use. Any recommendations?
    How about a wifi connected external drive? Or a drive wired directly to your home network? I plugged my TB drive directly into my router and works great.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by CDM76; 04-28-13 at 01:00 AM.
    04-27-13 03:33 PM
  3. Bugmapper's Avatar
    Wow, people on CB starting to buzz about this remote access thing. I wonder if Blackberry was intentionally quiet so as to make it a bit of an Easter Egg for 10.1 upgrade / Q10 sales and to make people start to wonder what other things are "built in" to BB10.
    04-27-13 03:54 PM
  4. BBInPlay's Avatar
    Remote file access will also be limited to the download speeds of your upload speed of your Internet connection at work or at home. If your files are in your work computer, download speeds will not be an issue but the slow upload speeds associated with your typical home commection will be painful if you're transferring large files. With files in the cloud, you should be limited only to the quality of your LTE connection.

    Posted via CB10
    And your work or home connection shrub ad fast or faster than LTE. So what is your point.



    Posted via CB10
    04-27-13 05:00 PM
  5. notfanboy's Avatar
    And your work or home connection shrub ad fast or faster than LTE. So what is your point.



    Posted via CB10
    Shrub?

    I think the point was that most residential ISPs throttle the upload speed severely. For me on Rogers, I can stream music and medium quality videos no problem, but HD videos will buffer to the point of unusability.
    04-27-13 05:54 PM
  6. jayrock52's Avatar
    Hello everyone! I have been following this thread for quite a while now but haven't had much to contribute. I just stumbled upon this article and I haven't seen it posted here yet (my apologies if it has). Looks like wall street is starting to get on board!

    http://www.thegadgetmasters.com/2013...on%252Btwitter

    I would just like to say this thread is awesome and a special thanks to M+8 for the great TA. It has definitely helped me out the past little while.

    Posted via CB10
    04-27-13 05:59 PM
  7. Scott Lefebvre's Avatar
    Wow, people on CB starting to buzz about this remote access thing. I wonder if Blackberry was intentionally quiet so as to make it a bit of an Easter Egg for 10.1 upgrade / Q10 sales and to make people start to wonder what other things are "built in" to BB10.
    Yep here is the beginning of the mobile computing architecture TH was talking about WOW !!!!

    More shares coming my way Monday
    Last edited by Scott Lefebvre; 04-27-13 at 06:19 PM.
    bungaboy, cjcampbell and Bugmapper like this.
    04-27-13 06:08 PM
  8. bungaboy's Avatar
    Scroogled, Google Drive, what a warm wet feeling.

    Put teeth in Google privacy fines
    By Marc Rotenberg, Special to CNN
    updated 11:45 AM EDT, Sat April 27, 2013

    Investigations into Google's "Street View" were launched in more than a dozen countries
    STORY HIGHLIGHTS
    Marc Rotenberg: Germany levied small fine on Google for gathering people's private info
    Fine was less than $200,000. Google made $10 billion in 2010. Fine has no teeth, he says
    Public agencies failing to strengthen laws on companies that threaten privacy, he says
    Rotenberg: Proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights a good step toward enforcement

    Editor's note: Marc Rotenberg is Executive Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. He teaches information privacy law at Georgetown University Law Center.

    (CNN) -- This week Germany levied a fine against Google for one of the biggest wiretapping violations in history. The fine? Less than $200,000. Google's net profits in 2012? More than $10 billion. Imagine a driver of a fancy car caught for speeding and then asked to pay a nickel. Google got off easier.

    Over several years and in countries around the world, Google drove cars with cameras mounted on the roof through communities and residential neighborhoods. Google said that it was gathering images to improve its "Street View" mapping program. But Google was also secretly collecting information about Internet access points in private homes and intercepting personal communications across wi-fi networks.

    Marc Rotenberg
    A privacy official in Germany had suspected that this was happening, but was repeatedly reassured by Google that it wasn't. When the official actually removed the hard drive from a Google vehicle, the true story came out. Investigations were launched in more than a dozen countries. "Street View" became "Spy-Fi."

    The Canadian privacy commissioner determined that the company had obtained medical records and financial records, private e-mails and passwords. In the United States, a group of attorneys general levied a $7 million fine against the company, after federal agencies in Washington failed to act. Google apologized, stopped collecting the wi-fi data (but not the location data) and promised to improve its privacy practices.

    This week the German official who triggered the original investigation announced the 145,000-euro fine, almost the largest amount allowed under European law, though insignificant for a company the size of Google. The public official was clearly unhappy about the outcome and told The New York Times, "As long as violations of data protection law are penalized with such insignificant sums, the ability of existing laws to protect personal privacy in the digital world, with its high potential for abuse, is barely possible."

    Google to pay $7 million in privacy case

    As the public concern about privacy is increasing, the failure of public agencies to take forceful action is becoming a problem. In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission announced important settlements with Facebook and Google back in 2011, but it has been reluctant to take any meaningful enforcement action since. Even after Google consolidated all of the data from across its 60 plus services last year into one data policy to "rule them all," the FTC remained silent.

    The Federal Communications Commission launched an investigation of Street View but levied only a $25,000 fine, even less than the amount in Germany, and that was for Google's obstruction during the investigation.

    Increasingly, Internet companies are advocating "self-regulation" and weak-willed politicians are telling users, "check your privacy settings, be careful what you post." In other words, you are on your own. That is terrible advice coming from those who know that users can do little to protect their data. User data is gathered surreptitiously, few users have the ability or time to know how it is collected, and even good privacy policies change quickly.

    It was only Mr. Casper's persistence that made it possible to challenge Google's data collection practices. It would have been impossible for those whose wi-fi communications were intercepted to know that their data was gathered by Google, let alone enforce privacy rights against the company. That is why it is important for officials to pursue investigations, enforce laws and impose significant penalties when warranted.

    The failure to enforce privacy laws is bad not only for Internet users, but also for smaller companies and innovative firms that are developing services that comply with privacy law. The success of "Privacy by Design," and other new approaches, depends on countries enforcing their laws. If they see their larger competitors get away with cutting corners, the message will be that they, too, can ignore the laws. This will lead to a vicious spiral that governments must avoid.

    In Europe, governments recognize the need to update and strengthen privacy laws. Efforts are under way to improve privacy protections. That will help consumers and Internet users all around the world as companies adopt better safeguards for personal data.

    In the United States, President Obama has called for a Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights and recommended the adoption of new privacy law. It is a good, forward-looking proposal that builds on existing law and addresses a key concern of Internet users today. Another proposal now in California would give Internet users the right to know the information private firms collect about them. It is a clever approach to privacy that does not restrict data collection; it simply makes companies more accountable to users.

    But it is not easy to enact new laws, particularly when large companies have so much influence over the political process. Still, there are many public officials who must share the frustration of Mr. Casper. Privacy protection without enforcement is no protection at all.
    04-27-13 06:24 PM
  9. cjcampbell's Avatar
    WOW!! Here, I know I lied and I took information that will make me millions so here's $5. I'm sorry... Good grief
    Shanerredflag, bungaboy and CDM76 like this.
    04-27-13 06:36 PM
  10. Scott Lefebvre's Avatar
    WOW!! Here, I know I took information that will make me millions so here's $5. I'm sorry... Good grief
    "But it is not easy to enact new laws, particularly when large companies have so much influence over the political process. Still, there are many public officials who must share the frustration of Mr. Casper. Privacy protection without enforcement is no protection at all."

    This paragraph says it all "Political Influence", thats the way big business works unfortunately...
    Shanerredflag and bungaboy like this.
    04-27-13 06:46 PM
  11. BBInPlay's Avatar
    Shrub?

    I think the point was that most residential ISPs throttle the upload speed severely. For me on Rogers, I can stream music and medium quality videos no problem, but HD videos will buffer to the point of unusability.
    I am with Rogers and LTE, very little difference in practice.

    Posted via CB10
    bungaboy likes this.
    04-27-13 06:47 PM
  12. notfanboy's Avatar
    I am with Rogers and LTE, very little difference in practice.

    Posted via CB10
    I was talking about Rogers Cable, the ISP. I thought the topic was about hosting a "personal cloud" from home, is it not? LTE is irrelevant because your home PC or NAS is not uploading using LTE.
    04-27-13 07:23 PM
  13. Bugmapper's Avatar
    Hello everyone! I have been following this thread for quite a while now but haven't had much to contribute. I just stumbled upon this article and I haven't seen it posted here yet (my apologies if it has). Looks like wall street is starting to get on board!

    Wall Street Upgrades BlackBerry’s Profit Estimate for This Year by 333% | The Gadget Masters

    I would just like to say this thread is awesome and a special thanks to M+8 for the great TA. It has definitely helped me out the past little while.

    Posted via CB10
    "Analysts have increased their earnings estimates for the current fiscal year from a profit of $0.06/share to $0.26/share, an increase of 333%":

    I could use a 333% increase in SP too! Can they upgrade that?

    Edit... my apologies..... Welcome!
    Last edited by Bugmapper; 04-27-13 at 08:38 PM. Reason: I'm an *****
    04-27-13 07:49 PM
  14. Charles Martin1's Avatar
    I figure that I'll be retiring when this stock finally returns to its former levels.

    Hopefully within a year.
    04-27-13 09:08 PM
  15. take99's Avatar
    a little more info on the DoD stuff:

    DISA Hits 1M Mark For Cloud Email Move; John Hale Comments
    Ross Wilkers Mar 14th, 2013 0 Comment

    The Defense Information Systems Agency recently migrated the one millionth user to a new cloud-based email system and aims to move all Army users to the new platform by next month, Federal News Radio reports.

    Jared Serbu writes 967,000 out of the 1 million users work for the Army and the military’s Joint Staff, U.S. European Command and Africa Command are in the DISA cloud as well.

    John Hale, DISA’s chief of enterprise applications, said Wednesday the system supports 80,000 BlackBerry devices and another 700 Android, Apple and Windows Mobile devices being tested in pilot programs.

    Serbu writes DISA is accepting bids from industry to build a mobile device management platform and internal application store.

    “We expect the award to be done this summer, and that solution will eventually replace the current pilots we have going on with all the different devices we have throughout the department,” Hale said, according to Federal News Radio.

    “We would see that standing side-by-side with our current BlackBerry infrastructure for a time, but we would expect to converge those two into a single solution next year,” he added.
    04-28-13 12:13 AM
  16. take99's Avatar
    this might be where the april date came from: article from October 2012

    The Pentagon on Wednesday said it would continue to support "large numbers" of BlackBerry phones made by Research in Motion even as it moves forward with plans that would allow the U.S. military to begin using Apple's iPhone and other devices.
    The U.S. Defense Department last week invited companies to submit bids for software that can monitor, manage and enforce security requirements for devices made by Apple and Google, with an eye to awarding a contract in April.
    The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) quietly posted its request for proposals on a federal website on Oct. 22, the same day that the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency said it would end its contract with RIM in favor of Apple's iPhone.
    Losing some of its Pentagon business to other providers could deal another blow to RIM, which once commanded the lead in the smartphone market but has rapidly lost ground to Apple and Samsung's line of products as customers abandon its aging BlackBerry devices.
    For many years, the Pentagon relied solely on BlackBerry phones because RIM met its tough security requirements, but other companies have been improving security on their devices, and a growing number of military commanders are clamoring for rival devices with bigger touch screens and faster browsers.
    A Pentagon spokesman said the U.S. military was working toward allowing vendors to supply other smartphones, while maintaining strict security requirements.
    He said the department aimed to use commercial mobile technologies as it stepped up the use of "new and innovative applications" to support the military's evolving requirements.
    But the Pentagon also stressed it was not moving away from its use of BlackBerry phones.
    "DISA is managing an enterprise email capability that continues to support large numbers of RIM devices while moving forward with the department's planned mobile management capability that will support a variety of mobility devices," the spokesman said.
    The DISA request for proposals said the software would manage at least 162,500 devices to start, but that number could grow to 262,500 by the end of the contract, which will have a one-year base and four six-month options.
    Ultimately, the Pentagon wants the software to support a total of 8 million devices, according to the document.
    RIM spokesman Paul Lucier said his company's BlackBerry Mobile Fusion product could also be used to manage Android and Apple devices, and RIM was "excited for the opportunity to include BlackBerry Mobile Fusion in the DOD's portfolio."
    Lucier said the product could enable the Pentagon to "support a growing number of mobile devices across multiple platforms."
    Waterloo, Ontario-based RIM is also planning to introduce new smartphones that will run on the BlackBerry 10 operating system, offering a faster and smoother user interface and a better platform for various smartphone applications.
    bungaboy likes this.
    04-28-13 12:26 AM
  17. take99's Avatar
    found these slides from a DISA conference last year, check out the last two. They state the plans for unclassified devices "mid - term" to be "APL", long term to be "BYOD". But for classified devices, it says mid-term and long term "APL".

    http://disa.mil/News/Conferences-and...2/Mobility.pdf
    Bugmapper likes this.
    04-28-13 12:53 AM
  18. take99's Avatar
    Nice article on SA


    BlackBerry Bear Case Is Flawed - Shares Should Double
    Apr 27 2013, 23:42 | by Mark Gomes | about: BBRY
    "In the long run we are all dead" - John Maynard Keynes

    The winds of change have not been kind to BlackBerry (BBRY) over the past several years. The mobile phone market has evolved to the company's detriment, potentially dealing a fatal blow to its long-term prospects as an independent entity.

    However, in the meantime, the company is at the onset of the biggest upgrade cycle in the company's history. This is well-known by investors, but not well-regarded. In fact, even my company Pipeline Data has viewed the new product cycle with skepticism. Product reviews have been mixed, with most saying the BlackBerry 10 operating system shows promise, but still lags Android and Apple's (AAPL) iOS.

    We concur, but none of those points are relevant to a short thesis. Here's why:

    1. The Z10 should be a modest success, but our research tells us the Q10 will be a home run. Based on proprietary survey work, most of the 76 million remaining BlackBerry customers love BlackBerry for its keyboard. Further, a large percentage dislike touch screens. In other words, a significant portion of the installed base has not only been waiting for a modern mobile operating system, they've been waiting for it to be featured on a QWERTY phone.

    Thus, we submit that the Q10 (and later, the R10) will be the true arbiters of BBRY's future. Further, our research has determined that early demand for the Q10 is outstripping what BBRY has experienced for the Z10 by a wide margin.

    Third-party data from ChangeWave Research suggests that the stock price underestimates how much gas is left in BlackBerry's tank. According to ChangeWave's home page, "For the second survey in a row, BlackBerry (7%) is registering a 3-pt uptick in planned buying." In other words, over the next 90 days, 7% of buyers who plan to buy a smartphone plan to buy a Blackerry.

    7% doesn't sound like much to write home about, especially considering that this number was likely closer to 40% a few years ago. However, a few years ago, 40% was enough to justify a $150 share price. With the stock now trading for $14, let's calculate what 7% market share could mean for the stock.

    First, looking at total worldwide demand, according to Gartner Group there were 207.7 million smartphones sold in Q4 of 2012 (up 38% versus Q4 of 2011. If another 200 million phones sell over the next 90 days, 7% share would represent 14 million BlackBerry smartphones.

    This number matches up well against another study, released in February by YouGov plc. According to the study, 43% of existing BlackBerry customers planned on purchasing a new BlackBerry phone over the next 6-months. With 76 million customers worldwide, that 43% represents 32.7 million phone sales over the next six-months. That's 16.3 million per 3-months, pretty close to the 14 million figure we calculated above.

    So, how does that stack up against Wall Street expectations? For that, we turned to the last BBRY earnings call. There, Wells Fargo's Maynard Um asked management about its guidance which implied "somewhere closer to around 3.5 million BlackBerry 10 units next quarter, which is only roughly about 23,000 units per carrier, which seems conservative."

    Based on the data points we've collected and discussed, that appears to be a understatement. Solidifying this view on the earning call, BBRY management admitted that it is ramping up production to meet the high demand it is experiencing. We suspect that most retail investors are unaware of this. It is likely they are also unaware of the statistics and calculations outlined above -- it's easier to simply assume that BlackBerry's competitive woes mean that the stock should go lower.

    That may prove true in the long-term. However, in the short-term, stocks react to performance versus earnings expectations. In that regard, the company seems to have more than enough cushion to top Wall Street's revenue estimates for the next several quarters.

    The prospects for profitability are even more encouraging. Looking at BBRY's gross margin profile, you can see that it was forced to sell its hardware for below cost in fiscal 2013. However, there is tremendous leverage in its model, providing the potential for gross margins to move back into the 30s if and when its revenues ramp back up.

    FY11 FY12 FY13
    Hardware Revenue 16,400 14,000 6,902
    Hardware COGS 10,500 11,217 7,060
    Gross Margins 36% 20% -2%
    Moving on to BBRY's operating structure, we have calculated that the incremental net income on each new BlackBerry phone will be approximately $80. This equates to about 15-cents of EPS for each million units of incremental new phone sales (cannibalization of older-phone sales is irrelevant, because the legacy line-up is not profitable).

    Taking all of this into account, if just 26% of BBRY's installed base upgrades over a 12-month period, EPS run rate should hit $3.00.

    That number could prove conservative. The smart phone replacement cycle typically spans 2-3 years. That implies 33-50% annual uptake from the legacy installed base. Also, despite all of the company's woes of the past two years, it actually has 25% more subscribers now than it did at the end of fiscal 2011. Two major drivers of this include corporate / government mandates and the BlackBerry's beloved QWERTY keyboard.

    In the corporate / government sector, CIOs still love BlackBerry. Its security, management, and reliability are still major differentiators. As for its keyboard, even bearish investors have to admit that this is likely one of the main things that have kept BlackBerry customers from switching to Apple or Samsung. Personally, I prefer touch screens, but there's a strong percentage of consumers who hate them...and love their BlackBerry keyboard. One of our key industry contacts summed it up as such:

    "Much of BlackBerry's installed base hates touch screens. They're dying for a better browser and a decent apps selection, but don't want to give up their QWERTY keyboard. Anyone in the installed base with the disposable income will upgrade when the Q-10 (and R-10) become available to them. Most of these 80 million people have no frame of reference with regard to Android or iOS. Considering what they're using now, they're going to love the BlackBerry 10 OS.

    There are also people like this on Apple devices today. A fair number will come back to BlackBerry over time.

    Corporate IT is watching closely as well. A number of big enterprise CIOs are BlackBerry fans. Many were forced to cave into employees' demand for iPhones and went BYOD, but they lose sleep every night thinking about the security risk. Given a good excuse I expect many of them to go back to BlackBerry-only for all employees. I think BB10 is that excuse.

    Don't get me wrong, I personally don't think BBRY will ever challenge Apple and Samsung again, but they have a strong base of customers and still have more to offer corporations and the government sector. That's more than enough to keep them well-fed for years to come."

    Thus, it's not hard to envision a scenario where upwards of 100% of BlackBerry's current subscribers upgrade to the Q10 or R10 over time. They will also win some percentage of feature-phone users who will look to upgrade to a smartphone in the coming years (along with a spattering of unhappy iPhone and Android users, including former BlackBerry disciples who grew tired of waiting for a modern operating system).

    Under this perfect-world scenario, BBRY would generate over $12 in EPS. Of course, we're not predicting this, but it lends more credence to the possibility of EPS reaching a $3.00 run rate in the coming quarters. Keep in mind, our $3.00 estimate excludes the potential impact of sales to new customers. According to our models, each 1% annual gain in installed base market share will produce upwards of $1.50 in EPS. Finally, lest we forget, $3.00 would still only represent half of what BBRY earned in fiscal 2011.

    As far as profitable companies go, some of BBRY's current metrics are sitting at levels that have historically been very favorable for investors. Its market cap is $7.5 billion, but with nearly $3 billion in cash, its enterprise value is just $4.5 billion ($8.75 per share). That gives it an EV/R&D ratio of 3, which puts it among the lowest 1% of profitable public companies. From an earnings perspective, if the company achieves $3.00 in EPS, an enterprise P/E of 8 would give it a $24 EV. Add back the net cash and we're looking at a $30+ stock.

    Conclusions

    With the fundamental outlook improving and short sellers representing 35% of the float, the path of least resistance is clearly to the upside. Specifically, we believe that two strong quarters will be more than enough to spark a massive short squeeze. The chart, currently in a consolidation pattern, also appears set to break to the upside.

    To be clear, this doesn't mean that BlackBerry will regain its past luster. However, with a high of $150 and a low of $6, the trick is calculating the valuation that accurately reflects BlackBerry's current risk/reward profile. Thus, while skepticism is still justified, BBRY's valuation seems to only reflect the risk. Considering all data we have collected, we now believe that BBRY will breech the $20 level in the coming months, rising more than 50% from current levels and more than triple its 52-week low.

    Disclosure: I am long BBRY. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

    Get push notifications on BBRY
    04-28-13 02:05 AM
  19. MrC05's Avatar
    Total noob question from me. How does one begin to learn about trading? I want to learn how to trade and make a little extra cash. How do you know which brokerage firm to choose?

    Posted via CB10
    04-28-13 02:21 AM
  20. richc3's Avatar
    Total noob question from me. How does one begin to learn about trading? I want to learn how to trade and make a little extra cash. How do you know which brokerage firm to choose?

    Posted via CB10
    In my opinion it's best to start with a stock market simulator. There are tons of these out there and they follow the current markets~ With that said, I understand that once we get that stock itch we likely don't have the patience for a simulator .
    As for terminology and alike - Investopedia - Educating the world about finance

    With regard to brokers, Questrade in Canada is great and I think it's... TradeKing in the US? Unless you're investing massive amounts of money, or intend to do some of the fancier stock tricks, you're probably alright with going for a low-commission broker.
    bungaboy likes this.
    04-28-13 02:33 AM
  21. W Hoa's Avatar
    Regarding the "BlackBerry Bear Case Is Flawed - Shares Should Double" post above: One of the comments, although anecdotal, had this to say,

    Ok I don't know if anyone has followed the release of the Q10 in London, but in Selfridges, where they still have exclusive, was sold out in the first 90 minutes on Friday, and yesterday I went there around 1 pm just to have a look, and was lucky to actually buy the last q10 they had. They have sold over 8000 units in Selfridges London, I was told. Having used the Z10 since the release, the Q10 just blew my mind, it is PERFECT and flawless. There is nothing like this phone out there, and I am certain that BB will sell loads of them.
    BlackBerry Bear Case Is Flawed - Shares Should Double - Seeking Alpha
    04-28-13 05:59 AM
  22. q649's Avatar
    Qandestrade in Canada is great and I think it's... TradeKing in the US? Unless you're investing massive amounts of money, or intend to do some of the fancier stock tricks, you're probably alright with going for a low-commission broker.
    Just a quick note: if you intend to buy and hold, Questrade charges "inactivity fees" which may cost you more in the long run than conventional brokers.
    04-28-13 06:56 AM
  23. bungaboy's Avatar
    Security . . . . don't leave home without it.

    Google Glass jailbreak gives hacker full access to Android OS

    Tech Radar

    Saturday, April 27, 2013 5:25 PM GMT

    After getting his hands on the Google Glass Explorer Edition headset, hacker Jay Freeman took just two hours to jailbreak the device and did so while having dinner with friends!

    The well-known hacker, aka 'Saurik', used a jailbreak for Android 4.0, developed by B1nary, to root the wearable computing device, giving him full access to the Android 4.0.4 operating system it runs on.

    Freeman, who obtained the device by pre-ordering it at Google I/O last year, announced his success on Friday via Twitter.

    He wrote: "#ifihadglass I would jailbreak it and modify the software (obviously). As Google actually sold me one; I did my part."

    In a phone interview with Forbes he explained: "It took me two hours while I was having dinner with friends at the time. The implementation from B1nary is for normal Android tablets and phones, I learned how it worked and then did the same thing on Glass…which was quite simple."

    He told Forbes he's not sure what can be achieved by rooting the device, but is intent on finding out. However, the lack of compatibility with his prescription specs make it difficult to view the screen for long periods.

    He said the hack may be a way for users to block Google's access to the device, such as the ability to remote brick the headset if users violate Ts&Cs.

    It could also be used, Freeman speculated, to store information locally on the headset or on a device linked via Bluetooth. This would prevent all of that juicy data finding its way to Google's servers.

    It's difficult to know what Google's response will be to the hack, but surely it had to know this was coming.
    04-28-13 07:53 AM
  24. morganplus8's Avatar
    I feel as thought this is a trick question as the obvious, uneducated choice, would be Thursday.
    cjc!!

    Trouble is, there is no sign of a bear raid in Thursday's trade, in order to call it a bear raid, you would have to be able to see it as such. We had our first down day in four sessions last week but there is zero sign that we broke any trend, that we simply didn't just correct after rallying hard, or that we had something dramatic happen here.

    This is what a bear raid looks like:

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-rim-april-27a-2013-chart.jpg

    You remember Earnings in December? How about the launch of the phone? Then there was the lack of sales in the US? How about that famous "more returns than sales"? There have been several of them and in each case, we dropped hard to the bottom of the pennant formation. Plenty of investors on this thread were ticked off by this nonsense and Heins was too. But Thursday? Nothing.

    Now we have this chart:

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-rim-april-27-2013-chart.jpg

    On Thursday we couldn't even get back to support, the uptrend line which is green; nothing. If you asked a pro trader, they couldn't find the trend change because the bears died last week. We even closed above $ 15.00/shr to finish a big rally for the week. We are going much higher from here. Relax and enjoy the ride!
    04-28-13 08:02 AM
  25. Plazmic Flame's Avatar
    Is it possible for me to buy 10 shares? What's the best route to do this?
    04-28-13 08:10 AM
107,088 ... 802803804805806 ...

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