View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

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1118. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    698 62.43%
  • No

    420 37.57%
  1. drobbie's Avatar
    Chen likely settled cheap to once again use whatever they had to show revenue, that's what he's been up to many years, although he masks it through asset sales, accounting changes, reporting changes, business changes, strategy changes,......

    The list goes on.

    So settlement was likely on the cheap end, like the cheap guy he claims to be, and will add some fluff (one time 'lumpy' as he likes to call them addition to revenue, which market will obviously ignore as the cash burn continues with bad decisions and eroding business. Chen will command himself for a job well done for settling even though it will be non-material, the descent to $3 will continue as cash burns from the $1Bn still showing little to negative growth. Into next year watsas converts come due, he will choose not to convert and reclaim his note leaving blackberry with less than 300MM cash, probably less from continuing problems.

    Chen will burn the company further as he cries and claims Watsa is the only one who can save the company and Watsa will get his fire sale discount to take the company under shortly thereafter burning shareholders to the crisp, Chen will still get his max compensation mind you.

    Alas this is the blackberry that's been ever since the drunks on the plane and the previous accounting scandals, and use of materials from conflicted zones. Blackberry was a mosquitoe to Facebook, snap, et Al. Instead of Chen banging the dolldrums and spreading message of privacy, he was getting red faced on the company jet traveling across the world meeting with famous people and politicians enhancing his own networks.

    Greed, corruption, and manipulation - we were all right on this board, sadly it was never the shorts. The stink was coming from within.

    Written by a pissed off shareholder! Never again!
    Why are you punishing yourself? If you feel that way about BlackBerry; sell the stock and use the losses to cover some of the gains you made elsewhere. At least the punishment would be over
    rarsen and rampagingpanda like this.
    12-03-19 11:31 PM
  2. dalinxz's Avatar
    Why are you punishing yourself? If you feel that way about BlackBerry; sell the stock and use the losses to cover some of the gains you made elsewhere. At least the punishment would be over
    Sometimes you're pot committed. That's why shareholders are so frustrated. Nothing but value loss in a market rally at ridiculous highs in a space where for what's being said, the company should be profiting.

    Voicing the concerns echoes the sentiment that I'm sure many perceive also.

    This is the internet, as little value as my words have at least some speak about the company exists as opposed to nothing that you see in a world so connected, b2b or not, the performance is lacklustre, and that's putting it lightly.
    techvisor likes this.
    12-04-19 12:55 AM
  3. Redzinaldas's Avatar
    OT: EYPT

    https://seekingalpha.com/news/352358...cess-of-dexycu

    EyePoint up 12% premarket on expanded access of Dexycu
    rarsen and Corbu like this.
    12-04-19 08:39 AM
  4. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Chen likely settled cheap to once again use whatever they had to show revenue, that's what he's been up to many years, although he masks it through asset sales, accounting changes, reporting changes, business changes, strategy changes,......

    The list goes on.

    So settlement was likely on the cheap end, like the cheap guy he claims to be, and will add some fluff (one time 'lumpy' as he likes to call them addition to revenue, which market will obviously ignore as the cash burn continues with bad decisions and eroding business. Chen will command himself for a job well done for settling even though it will be non-material, the descent to $3 will continue as cash burns from the $1Bn still showing little to negative growth. Into next year watsas converts come due, he will choose not to convert and reclaim his note leaving blackberry with less than 300MM cash, probably less from continuing problems.

    Chen will burn the company further as he cries and claims Watsa is the only one who can save the company and Watsa will get his fire sale discount to take the company under shortly thereafter burning shareholders to the crisp, Chen will still get his max compensation mind you.

    Alas this is the blackberry that's been ever since the drunks on the plane and the previous accounting scandals, and use of materials from conflicted zones. Blackberry was a mosquitoe to Facebook, snap, et Al. Instead of Chen banging the dolldrums and spreading message of privacy, he was getting red faced on the company jet traveling across the world meeting with famous people and politicians enhancing his own networks.

    Greed, corruption, and manipulation - we were all right on this board, sadly it was never the shorts. The stink was coming from within.

    Written by a pissed off shareholder! Never again!
    Know the rules if you’re going to play the game. BlackBerry has been investigated long before Chen and Watsa ever showed up. BlackBerry and the BOD didn’t have to accept his money and the attached terms it came with.
    12-04-19 09:03 AM
  5. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Sometimes you're pot committed. That's why shareholders are so frustrated. Nothing but value loss in a market rally at ridiculous highs in a space where for what's being said, the company should be profiting.

    Voicing the concerns echoes the sentiment that I'm sure many perceive also.

    This is the internet, as little value as my words have at least some speak about the company exists as opposed to nothing that you see in a world so connected, b2b or not, the performance is lacklustre, and that's putting it lightly.
    Where do you get this idea that Chen and Watsa have the same interests as you?
    Dunt Dunt Dunt likes this.
    12-04-19 09:10 AM
  6. zeman665's Avatar
    New article from bloomberg law on patent suits. By the title it doesnt look like BlackBerry is making much progress. I do not have full access, but wanted to share anyway just in case someone does: https://news.bloomberglaw.com/ip-law...aces-headwinds
    Last edited by zeman665; 12-04-19 at 11:46 AM.
    12-04-19 11:29 AM
  7. dalinxz's Avatar
    New article from bloomberg law on patent suits. By the title it doesnt look like BlackBerry is making much progress. I do not have full access, but wanted to share anyway just in case someone does: https://news.bloomberglaw.com/ip-law...aces-headwinds
    and where's Chen, nowhere in sight. When's the next webinar? what a joke.
    techvisor likes this.
    12-04-19 12:15 PM
  8. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    and where's Chen, nowhere in sight. When's the next webinar? what a joke.
    Again, what’s Chen supposed to be doing other than what his bosses tell him to do? Of course I’m referring to Watsa, Fairfax and other institutional shareholders?

    What and why do you think he should do anything differently? If his primary shareholders aren’t concerned about share price in current term and more concerned with the long-term play to salvage their investments, what the problem with that?
    Last edited by Chuck Finley69; 12-04-19 at 01:26 PM.
    12-04-19 12:31 PM
  9. Corbu's Avatar
    New article from bloomberg law on patent suits. By the title it doesnt look like BlackBerry is making much progress. I do not have full access, but wanted to share anyway just in case someone does: https://news.bloomberglaw.com/ip-law...aces-headwinds
    BlackBerry’s Push to Expand Patent Licensing Faces Headwinds

    2019-12-04 09:00:00.2 GMT
    By Susan Decker

    (Bloomberg) -- BlackBerry Ltd.’s push to fund its transition to a cybersecurity business by increasing patent royalties from social media companies like Facebook Inc. is faltering.

    A judge in California has invalidated a number of BlackBerry’s patents and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is reviewing others, undermining the storied Canadian tech company’s efforts to expand the licensing of its 37,000 patents. Licensing and intellectual property made up 21% of BlackBerry’s $932 million in revenue last year. The company has completely switched to making money from software for cars, cybersecurity products and patent licensing after shutting down its once-dominant phone business in 2016.

    The licensing “has been a more reliable source” of revenue for the company, said Todd Coupland, a CIBC analyst who downgraded the company to neutral in September. “It’s a high- profit business when they win those cases.”

    But BlackBerry’s experience trying to boost revenue from old inventions it claims other companies are using without licenses may turn into a cautionary tale. More than a year of failed licensing talks followed by nearly two years of litigation over messaging apps, targeted advertising and other technologies haven’t resulted in any promised payoff. BlackBerry has recently given up pursuing a case in district court against Snap Inc., hoping for better luck with an appeals court. Facebook persuaded the PTO to take a second look at some of its patents. And BlackBerry is trying to settle a much-diminished case against Twitter Inc.

    The three companies struck back swiftly, filing more than two dozen petitions with the patent office seeking to have BlackBerry patents canceled. While some requests were denied, the agency has opened reviews of seven BlackBerry patents after finding the challengers had a “reasonable likelihood” of winning their invalidity arguments, with final decisions expected next year. It’s still considering other challenges.

    More troubling for BlackBerry, the judge overseeing the lawsuits has thrown out some of the patents, saying they merely cover abstract ideas not eligible for patent protection.

    Two patents, for targeted advertising, cover the abstract idea of organizing information and selecting what information to send to a mobile device, District Court Judge George Wu in Los Angeles ruled. Two other patents, for a way to find where other people are congregating, attempt to cover the concept of identifying activity, the judge said.

    BlackBerry dropped other patent claims against Snap so it could immediately file appeals with a court in Washington that specializes in patent law. Likewise, it plans to ask the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit to review the decisions as it pertains to Facebook.

    Wu later indicated he would invalidate two other BlackBerry patents for a way to handle messages in the case against Twitter, likening one to “determining that a heckler’s increased, repeated comments at a rally require some intervention by event security.”

    With the case weakened against Twitter after the ruling, BlackBerry and Twitter are engaged in settlement talks and have put that case on hold until Jan. 6.

    Meanwhile, Facebook has its own patent-infringement suit against BlackBerry, accusing the company of infringing voice- messaging technology. That case, filed in San Francisco, is moving at a slower pace.

    BlackBerry has been working to establish itself as the secure gateway between data and mobile users. Its historic connected to security -- forged when its old devices were called “crackberries” -- is attractive with governments, health care and finance, where privacy and security count, said John Butler, an analyst with Bloomberg Intelligence.

    Selling the rights to use the BlackBerry name on devices and licensing patent rights helps the company maintain profitability.

    “The profits from licensing are hugely helpful to them,” Butler said. “They’re in the middle innings of trying to get recent acquisitions more tightly integrated into the organization.” BlackBerry and Facebook didn’t respond to queries seeking comment; both Snap and Twitter declined to comment. The patents in this case are only a fraction of those BlackBerry has received over the years. In March, an analyst questioned BlackBerry Chief Executive John Chen about the life of the company’s patents, and whether it can sustain its revenue stream. Chen said the company has more than 100 applications in the pipeline and more it obtained from buying Cylance. “So we are filling up the pipeline very rapidly,” he said, according to a transcript of the call. “We have a lot of innovation going on in the company, so that I wouldn’t be overly concerned.”

    --With assistance from Gerrit De Vynck.
    dalinxz, rarsen, W Hoa and 4 others like this.
    12-04-19 12:43 PM
  10. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Selling the rights to use the BlackBerry name on devices and licensing patent rights helps the company maintain profitability.
    .
    Not so sure the name on devices has helped them maintain any profitability.....


    The patent monetization was never a guarantee... they may lose half the battles they fight. But in the end any win is better than what they had before. But I don't think you can count on this as a long term growth segment. The R & D they do today is a pale shadow of what once went on at BlackBerry.

    I do wonder about the prospects of Cylance in this area. Four years ago they sorta pioneered (or at least greatly advanced it) AI Security. Today there are over a dozen AI security solutions.... In their pioneering of the field, did they create something "new"???
    dalinxz and techvisor like this.
    12-05-19 08:32 AM
  11. EchoTango's Avatar
    Not so sure the name on devices has helped them maintain any profitability.....


    The patent monetization was never a guarantee... they may lose half the battles they fight. But in the end any win is better than what they had before. But I don't think you can count on this as a long term growth segment. The R & D they do today is a pale shadow of what once went on at BlackBerry.
    Speaking once again as a shareholder I find the IP revenues, including patent settlements somewhat gratifying.

    Blackberry was a pioneer in smartphone technology and got run over by many companies who went on to become global players. I find it ironic that these companies vigorously defend their use of Blackberry patents with endless legal gymnastics while wallowing in huge profits and growing revenues. I understand they have the right to defend themselves but from a moralistic perspective, they have significantly profited from a marketplace Blackberry largely created.

    With the recent lackluster results from the protracted lawsuits in California one wonders if the courts aren't highly biased to their local constituents given the copious amount of taxes they collectively pay and the elected judges deciding these cases.

    I think any revenues from licensing is at least something for assets that helped many companies achieve their current success.
    rarsen, La Emperor and Corbu like this.
    12-05-19 10:34 AM
  12. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Speaking once again as a shareholder I find the IP revenues, including patent settlements somewhat gratifying.

    Blackberry was a pioneer in smartphone technology and got run over by many companies who went on to become global players. I find it ironic that these companies vigorously defend their use of Blackberry patents with endless legal gymnastics while wallowing in huge profits and growing revenues. I understand they have the right to defend themselves but from a moralistic perspective, they have significantly profited from a marketplace Blackberry largely created.

    With the recent lackluster results from the protracted lawsuits in California one wonders if the courts aren't highly biased to their local constituents given the copious amount of taxes they collectively pay and the elected judges deciding these cases.

    I think any revenues from licensing is at least something for assets that helped many companies achieve their current success.
    Or, it could simply be a difference in opinion regarding whether or not IP has been stolen or borrowed without payment. Obviously, IP with these companies isn’t always black and white even when gray isn’t available. Sometimes you wonder if the patent or trademark was ever really valid to begin with.
    12-05-19 11:01 AM
  13. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Or, it could simply be a difference in opinion regarding whether or not IP has been stolen or borrowed without payment. Obviously, IP with these companies isn’t always black and white even when gray isn’t available. Sometimes you wonder if the patent or trademark was ever really valid to begin with.
    Let's face it BlackBerry has had their own issues with borrowing IP. Heck I'm surprised the folks that now own AOL aren't going after everyone that offers a messenger today...

    But again, doesn't really hurt to try and monetize the IP and get what you can for it. Except for when shareholders get their hopes up and start counting the billions before they are collected. I bet a few here were happy to scoop up more shares at $10.50 a share when the news first hit the street. Counting your chickens before the eggs hatch is a risk.

    In the end I think this is a win for BlackBerry.... kinda like Great Britain held on to the New World (till 1867/1982) by keeping Canada,
    dalinxz likes this.
    12-05-19 11:26 AM
  14. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Let's face it BlackBerry has had their own issues with borrowing IP. Heck I'm surprised the folks that now own AOL aren't going after everyone that offers a messenger today...

    But again, doesn't really hurt to try and monetize the IP and get what you can for it. Except for when shareholders get their hopes up and start counting the billions before they are collected. I bet a few here were happy to scoop up more shares at $10.50 a share when the news first hit the street. Counting your chickens before the eggs hatch is a risk.

    In the end I think this is a win for BlackBerry.... kinda like Great Britain held on to the New World (till 1867/1982) by keeping Canada,
    LOL
    12-05-19 01:06 PM
  15. EchoTango's Avatar
    In the end I think this is a win for BlackBerry.... kinda like Great Britain held on to the New World (till 1867/1982) by keeping Canada,
    As a Canadian, I object to the historical reference as we all know in 1867 the British were loaded onto boats and sent back over the ocean never to return. The fact that we have the British monarch on our money is to lull them into a sense of complacency and keep them away.

    So far it's worked wonderfully.
    Dunt Dunt Dunt and FeitaInc like this.
    12-05-19 02:04 PM
  16. Corbu's Avatar
    OT: ACAD

    A thought for Morgan, with ACAD's latest news on pimavanserin.

    Hope you are well, my friend!
    La Emperor, FeitaInc and JLagoon like this.
    12-05-19 02:42 PM
  17. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    As a Canadian, I object to the historical reference as we all know in 1867 the British were loaded onto boats and sent back over the ocean never to return. The fact that we have the British monarch on our money is to lull them into a sense of complacency and keep them away.

    So far it's worked wonderfully.
    It’s okay. We kicked their arses once, we’d still help you out if need be.....

    Technically we’re all mericuns
    EchoTango likes this.
    12-05-19 03:06 PM
  18. W Hoa's Avatar
    Crowd Strike just reported earnings. All figures here are non-gaap and guidance, not this quarters results.

    CrowdStrike is providing the following guidance for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020 (ending January 31, 2020) and is raising its guidance for fiscal year 2020 (ending January 31, 2020):



    Q4 FY20
    Guidance

    Full Year FY20
    Guidance



    Total revenue

    $135.9 – $38.6 million

    $465.2 – $468.0 million



    Non-GAAP loss from operations

    $(21.6) – $(19.7) million

    $(80.5) – $(78.6) million



    Non-GAAP net loss

    $(19.1) – $(17.2) million

    $(77.7) – $(75.8) million



    Non-GAAP net loss per share, basic and diluted

    $(0.09) – $(0.08)

    $(0.53) – $(0.52)


    Weighted average shares used in computing Non-GAAP net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted

    205.2 million

    146.7 million


    https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/cr...210510661.html
    Last edited by W Hoa; 12-05-19 at 04:58 PM.
    Dunt Dunt Dunt and Corbu like this.
    12-05-19 04:44 PM
  19. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Crowd Strike just reported earnings. All figures non-gaap. If only BB could produce these figures. Lol
    Clearly that market is exploding...
    12-05-19 04:57 PM
  20. Corbu's Avatar

    Grant Courville, VP, Products & Strategy, Blackberry QNX, sits down with John Furrier & Lisa Martin for AWS re:Invent 2019 at the Sands Expo & Convention Center in Las Vegas, NV.
    rarsen, La Emperor and smithm565 like this.
    12-05-19 07:09 PM
  21. Corbu's Avatar
    https://www.blackberry.com/us/en/com...cember-20-2019
    BlackBerry to Announce Fiscal Year 2020 Third Quarter Results on December 20, 2019

    12-06-19 09:43 AM
  22. Corbu's Avatar
    In German:
    https://www.sueddeutsche.de/digital/...rbot-1.4713341

    Machine translation:

    Court prohibits Whatsapp, Facebook and Instagram in Germany

    The Munich Regional Court judges: Whatsapp, Instagram, Facebook and Facebook Messenger in their current form violate patents held by Blackberry. This involves several individual functions that are not decisive for the operation of the apps.

    The ruling is not yet final, and Facebook is more likely to redesign its apps than switch them off across Germany.

    The background is a series of international patent lawsuits by Blackberry, which have accused the company of being a "patent troll".

    By Jannis Brühl

    Millions and millions of Germans use Instagram, Whatsapp and Facebook. Now the Munich I Regional Court has decided that the Facebook group is no longer allowed to offer these apps in their current form. In nine cases, the court ruled on Thursday that parts of the software infringed patents held by the Canadian company Blackberry. A spokeswoman for the court stated: "The judgments effectively prohibit the offering and delivery of the aforementioned applications in the Federal Republic of Germany for use in the Federal Republic of Germany as long as they use the patents at issue. Facebook could comply with the ban by "no longer offering and delivering apps at all or by modifying them beforehand in such a way that the specifically attacked functionality is modified". According to Facebook, the latter will probably be done soon.

    The ruling is not yet legally binding, and a Facebook spokesman told the SZ that an appeal might be lodged. However, the company could still be forced to act because the ruling is "provisionally enforceable". If Blackberry deposits a sum of money with the court or gives Facebook a guarantee as security, Facebook must implement the ban. The money would provide security in the event that the Higher Regional Court grants Facebook an appeal. Then Blackberry would have to compensate for the damage that Facebook could have already suffered. For each case, the court has set the amount of security at between one million and 1.6 million euros.

    However, it is unlikely that the company will switch off Whatsapp, Instagram, Facebook and Facebook Messenger in Germany once that security has been deposited. The Facebook spokesman said: "We plan to adapt our products accordingly so that we can continue to offer them in Germany". How the apps would actually change is still unclear. So whether users feel the ban now depends on whether Blackberry deposits a lot of money.

    Facebook is also fundamentally opposed to Blackberry's legal attacks: "We have challenged the validity of the Blackberry patents on which the injunction action is based and are waiting for the decision of the Federal Patent Court.

    The Munich court specializes in patent disputes. The ruling concerns four Blackberry patents, some of which are used by individual Facebook Group apps and some of which are used by all four: Whatsapp, Instagram, Facebook and Facebook Messenger.

    Smartphone development overruns Blackberry

    In the proceedings, the lawyers of both parties argued before the judge about complex technical details of the software, such as whether Whatsapp uses a technology on which Blackberry holds a patent when sending the entire "history" of a chat - i.e. the course of the chat - by e-mail to third parties. Or which parts of this process are executed by Whatsapps Software and which by the operating system iOS, for which Apple is responsible, not Facebook, but the manufacturer Apple. In addition, there were disputes about friendship suggestions in the Facebook app and switching from one chat to another in Messenger apps.

    Blackberry mobile phones heralded the smartphone era in the noughties. The Blackberry Messenger works in a similar way to chat apps today. However, the development overrode the then Blackberry manufacturer RIM. Today Apple, Samsung and other manufacturers shape the smartphone market.

    Even after various company conversions, Blackberry still holds many patents which, according to the company, are used by other companies without permission. Facebook, for example, is sued worldwide by Blackberry in various proceedings.

    Blackberry denies that he is little more than a "patent troll" - in other words, a company that tries to make money in a dubious way with patent suits rather than with serious business. The accusation is that Blackberry hopes that the court proceedings will force other companies to conclude expensive license deals with him in order to be able to continue using the software as before. What Blackberry, for example, would have from turning off the chat function in Instagram is unclear.

    Update, December 6, 2019, 16:11: The article has been updated with further statements by the court speaker.
    12-06-19 10:44 AM
  23. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Kinda looks like Kevin with some age on him....
    12-06-19 10:46 AM
  24. smithm565's Avatar
    12-06-19 02:37 PM
  25. Sigewif's Avatar
    Was this posted here yet? It is a not altogether negative article on BlackBerry stocks:
    https://finance.yahoo.com/amphtml/ne...011439926.html
    rarsen and FeitaInc like this.
    12-06-19 10:09 PM
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