View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1110. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    694 62.52%
  • No

    416 37.48%
  1. spiller's Avatar
    Doesn't refute they didn't give rcmp non BES global key access which was potentially used by rcmp with just an 'awareness' email to BlackBerry since 2010.



    Posted via CB10
    04-18-16 09:29 AM
  2. Andrew4life's Avatar
    In a nutshell, you got to pay to play.

    We will compromise if you buy out basic phones, but we won't if you buy out Enterprise grade security.

    Money...money money money.....



    Posted via CB10
    bbjdog likes this.
    04-18-16 09:35 AM
  3. app_Developer's Avatar
    A lot better then what I wrote! That's why I leave it to the pros to take care of the matter. Cheers!
    But is he saying that BB can decrypt BES messages if served with a court order? I think they actually can't, because BB doesn't have the keys, but he didn't make that clear at all. How is BES messaging consistent with his commitment to working with law enforcement?

    Also, he addressed BES users, but what is he saying about consumer BBM users who don't have BES or BBM Protected?
    04-18-16 09:38 AM
  4. Iggy City's Avatar
    In a nutshell, you got to pay to play.

    We will compromise if you buy out basic phones, but we won't if you buy out Enterprise grade security.

    Money...money money money.....



    Posted via CB10
    Of course, what did you think BlackBerry was different than any other company?

    It's always about money, this is capitalism after all.
    04-18-16 09:45 AM
  5. _dimi_'s Avatar
    But is he saying that BB can decrypt BES messages if served with a court order? I think they actually can't, because BB doesn't have the keys, but he didn't make that clear at all. How is BES messaging consistent with his commitment to working with law enforcement?

    Also, he addressed BES users, but what is he saying about consumer BBM users who don't have BES or BBM Protected?
    Is it really that important? BES is the gold standard for companies, governments,.. who are willing to pay for security. If there are suspicious clients that attract too much attention from the government, BlackBerry could ditch them just like banks do when they see suspicious money transfers.

    Posted via CB10
    bbjdog likes this.
    04-18-16 09:53 AM
  6. bbjdog's Avatar
    But is he saying that BB can decrypt BES messages if served with a court order? I think they actually can't, because BB doesn't have the keys, but he didn't make that clear at all. How is BES messaging consistent with his commitment to working with law enforcement?

    Also, he addressed BES users, but what is he saying about consumer BBM users who don't have BES or BBM Protected?
    He did make it clear, but sorry to say! I will not comment on it. Use private chat, there and gone. Sorry app_Developer, but I'm staying out.

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    04-18-16 09:59 AM
  7. Corbu's Avatar
    04-18-16 10:48 AM
  8. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Learn about BlackBerry lawful access principles
    BlackBerry*lawful access principles

    The carriers capabilities are limited to the strict context of lawful access and national security requirements as governed by the countrys judicial oversight and rules of law.

    The carriers capabilities must be technology- and vendor-neutral, allowing no greater access to BlackBerry consumer services than the carriers and regulators already impose on BlackBerrys competitors and other similar communications technology companies.

    No changes to the security architecture for BlackBerry Enterprise Server customers since, contrary to any rumors, the security architecture is the same around the world and BlackBerry*truly has no ability to provide its customers encryption keys.

    Also driving BlackBerrys position is the fact that strong encryption is a fundamental commercial requirement for any country to attract and maintain international business anyway and similarly strong encryption is currently used pervasively in traditional VPNs on both wired and wireless networks in order to protect corporate and government communications.

    BlackBerry*maintains a consistent global standard for lawful access requirements that does not include special deals for specific countries.

    Posted via CB10
    bungaboy, Corbu, rarsen and 3 others like this.
    04-18-16 11:25 AM
  9. bbjdog's Avatar
    Let's see what play this gets on the evening news? I'm also looking forward to those not so professional side kicks giving there cents worth.

    OT: joke of the day, oil price!

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    04-18-16 11:28 AM
  10. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Fair play from Imperial Capital. PRIV is not what they had forecasted. This is part of their report in December:

    Analysts at Imperial Capital maintained an in-line rating on the stock while raising the price target from $7 to $9, following third-quarter earnings. Imperial Capital believes that BlackBarry is making good progress with its recent turnaround strategy and has seen robust growth in software license revenue. The research firm has backed the company to see improvement in hardware revenue on the back of its Android phone.

    Posted via CB10
    04-18-16 11:57 AM
  11. Corbu's Avatar
    04-18-16 12:01 PM
  12. Corbu's Avatar
    Let's see what play this gets on the evening news?
    Not a peep, I bet.
    bbjdog and bungaboy like this.
    04-18-16 12:03 PM
  13. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Morgan - I remember you stated that BlackBerry as a SW company would have somewhere between .60-.70 in EPS? I can't find the original post, but could you please in a nutshell explain how you arrive there? How will the 30 percent increase affect EPS and wouldn't a MOBL acquisition be smart because of the synergies it offers?

    Posted via CB10
    04-18-16 12:05 PM
  14. bbjdog's Avatar
    Not a peep, I bet.
    If I give them ten dollars do you think they will. Lol

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    bungaboy and 3MIKE like this.
    04-18-16 12:09 PM
  15. Corbu's Avatar
    If I give them ten dollars do you think they will. Lol
    A banana will do.
    04-18-16 12:41 PM
  16. bbjdog's Avatar
    A banana will do.
    Thanks for the laughter!



    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Corbu likes this.
    04-18-16 12:51 PM
  17. app_Developer's Avatar
    Is it really that important? BES is the gold standard for companies, governments,.. who are willing to pay for security. If there are suspicious clients that attract too much attention from the government, BlackBerry could ditch them just like banks do when they see suspicious money transfers.
    So it's one thing to dump a customer, it's another to help law enforcement to decrypt messages.

    Here's why it matters: if I'm going to buy or renew BES, I want to know that BB cannot (with any reasonable amount of effort) decrypt my messages. In other words, I want to be sure there BB does not have access to my keys. Again, I believe the answer is that BB does not actually have access to our keys. That's good, because that is what any major customer will want to know. That's an important selling point of BES.

    BUT, the issue is when Chen makes these statements about cooperating with law enforcement to decrypt messages. I think what Chen said is that this isn't possible for BB to do with BES. Again, that's good for BES customers, but then Chen should back off on his statements about cooperating with law enforcement. Essentially what he is saying is that they won't protect criminal or terrorist activity unless the criminal org pays for BES and manages their own keys.

    If the criminal has a BES account, Chen is saying he actually can't decrypt content for law enforcement. Isn't that correct?

    Then for the consumer case, Chen is also now admitting that consumers have end to end encryption in WA, but not in the normal BBM app on their phones. Isn't that also correct?
    04-18-16 01:01 PM
  18. _dimi_'s Avatar
    So it's one thing to dump a customer, it's another to help law enforcement to decrypt messages.

    Here's why it matters: if I'm going to buy or renew BES, I want to know that BB cannot (with any reasonable amount of effort) decrypt my messages. In other words, I want to be sure there BB does not have access to my keys. Again, I believe the answer is that BB does not actually have access to our keys. That's good, because that is what any major customer will want to know. That's an important selling point of BES.

    BUT, the issue is when Chen makes these statements about cooperating with law enforcement to decrypt messages. I think what Chen said is that this isn't possible for BB to do with BES. Again, that's good for BES customers, but then Chen should back off on his statements about cooperating with law enforcement. Essentially what he is saying is that they won't protect criminal or terrorist activity unless the criminal org pays for BES and manages their own keys.

    If the criminal has a BES account, Chen is saying he actually can't decrypt content for law enforcement. Isn't that correct?

    Then for the consumer case, Chen is also now admitting that consumers have end to end encryption in WA, but not in the normal BBM app on their phones. Isn't that also correct?
    So if a customer is using BES and this particular customer refuses to provide a law enforcement agency with e.g. the encryption keys that are in their possession only, BlackBerry could drop this customer, thus helping law enforcement agencies. Different audience, different rules.

    Banks do it all the time without telling their customers why they're dropping them as an account. They just don't want the hassle with the government.

    Posted via CB10
    04-18-16 01:22 PM
  19. bungaboy's Avatar
    So if a customer is using BES and this particular customer refuses to provide a law enforcement agency with e.g. the encryption keys that are in their possession only, BlackBerry could drop this customer, thus helping law enforcement agencies. Different audience, different rules.

    Posted via CB10
    Suck and blow at the same time, don't they?
    masterful likes this.
    04-18-16 01:27 PM
  20. bbjdog's Avatar
    Direct sales

    http://blogs.blackberry.com/2016/04/...sales-program/

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Corbu, rarsen, Mr BBRY and 4 others like this.
    04-18-16 03:33 PM
  21. bbjdog's Avatar
    From the home page.

    http://crackberry.com/snag-unlocked-...-priv-just-450

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    rarsen, morganplus8 and 3MIKE like this.
    04-18-16 03:35 PM
  22. CDM76's Avatar
    But is he saying that BB can decrypt BES messages if served with a court order? I think they actually can't, because BB doesn't have the keys, but he didn't make that clear at all. How is BES messaging consistent with his commitment to working with law enforcement?

    Also, he addressed BES users, but what is he saying about consumer BBM users who don't have BES or BBM Protected?
    I'm sorry but this honestly just sounds like you are trying to bait people into an argument.

    Posted via CB10
    04-18-16 05:43 PM
  23. CDM76's Avatar
    Let's see what play this gets on the evening news?

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Absolutely nothing. BlackBerry missed the train here. If they responded in a timely manner and on point then the media likely would have given their side too. But, BlackBerry was caught asleep at the wheel. The media has moved on as they've done the damaged intended.

    Posted via CB10
    Corbu, bungaboy and 3MIKE like this.
    04-18-16 05:50 PM
  24. app_Developer's Avatar
    I'm sorry but this honestly just sounds like you are trying to bait people into an argument.
    Someone said that Chen had made a great statement. I'm pointing out they didn't really answer some important questions here.

    I think rather than outflank Apple to the one side they chose, they really should have outflanked them to the other side with this statement, since that's much more consistent with their BES strategy (and the reality of the solution they actually provide to businesses and govt). So emphasize the strength of *not* being able to decrypt those messages since that is how BB actually makes money and it is arguably their strongest technical advantage of all. Instead they headline this statement with the opposite of that. I don't understand it.

    Where I come from that's called a discussion. Of course I also don't live in an echo chamber, so maybe I don't know.

    It seems people are saying all is fine, but I'm asking didn't Chen just throw the ball into the teeth of the defense (again!) when a better play was available on the other side of the field?
    b121 likes this.
    04-18-16 05:53 PM
  25. bbjdog's Avatar
    Things we already know, but those who still have questions and must find reason when there is none. From my TD alert.

    Blackberry CEO says tech firms should comply with lawful access requests
    2016-04-18 05:55:00 PM ET (Reuters)
    * *
    * *
    TORONTO, April 18 (Reuters) - Tech companies should comply with lawful requests to access protected data, BlackBerry Chief Executive John Chen said on Monday, in thinly veiled criticism of rival Apple Inc for its recent standoff with the FBI.

    Chen made the comment in a blog posting after reports by Vice and Motherboard last week that threw a spotlight on a 2014 case in which Canadian law enforcement authorities used intercepted messages between some BlackBerry devices to unravel an organized crime network.

    The devices were consumer phones that were not protected by BlackBerry's BES server, which helps secure any devices running within corporate networks.

    "We have long been clear in our stance that tech companies as good corporate citizens should comply with reasonable lawful access requests," said Chen in the post.[http://blck.by/1qUkdJg ]

    "We are indeed in a dark place when companies put their reputations above the greater good," said Chen, who is known to not shy away from publicly sparring with rivals.

    Chen, who maintains the BES is "impenetrable" and that only BlackBerry's clients can grant access to messages secured by it, has weighed in on the lawful access topic a number of times in the last few months, including in another blog last December. [http://blck.by/1k4jy46 ]

    He also commented on the topic at a media roundtable earlier this month, when asked to comment about BlackBerry's security capabilities in light of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation's hacking of an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. Apple had declined to help authorities unlock the encrypted device.

    "Not that we can crack every phone, but from the standpoint of BlackBerry's philosophy, policy and principles, we will help whenever there is a formal subpoena that comes to us and we have been doing it for many, many, years," said Chen.

    "But since we don't have a backdoor and since the encryption technology has now gotten to a point where we may, or may not be able to penetrate it, we will have the same difficulties, but we won't have the same attitude about it and it won't be front page news."

    "Of course we are not Apple, so it may or may not make front page news either," added Chen with a coy smile. (Reporting by Euan Rocha; Editing by Tom Brown)

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Corbu, rarsen, Mr BBRY and 6 others like this.
    04-18-16 06:10 PM
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