View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.66%
  • No

    413 37.34%
  1. bungaboy's Avatar
    Now my head hurts even worse . . .

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-tennis-animated-gif-28.jpg
    CDM76, bbjdog, Corbu and 3 others like this.
    04-05-16 02:18 PM
  2. early2bed's Avatar
    It's interesting to think that, given the popularity of index fund investing and the fact that AAPL is one of the most common equities to be owned in these funds, there are probably far more AAPL investors on CrackBerry than BBRY investors.
    Elephant_Canyon likes this.
    04-05-16 02:53 PM
  3. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    I for one would like to see aggressive BlackBerry stock buyback, debt repurchase, strategic alliance announcements, and any other actions by CEO Chen before Shorts drive this SP and this company to zero...

    ... I also welcome Chen aggressively looking to sell the company (Samsung please!) ....

    Yes.. I am one very angry shareholder!!.... does not matter whether you have a great product if people are no longer buying....bold steps are needed... and now. Even the Blackberry base has lost confidence... and are not looking to purchase blackberry again...

    Chen does not have the luxury to wait until September, imo....

    Last quarter's big miss on hardware signaled that .... time is one luxury no longer available...only results matter.

    End of rant.





    Posted via CB10
    lech31 and techvisor like this.
    04-05-16 03:24 PM
  4. Sigewif's Avatar
    People know they exist.
    My experience is that more people do not (did not) know they exist than do until I show them my Priv. Then they say something like "Hey, what kind of phone is that you have?" and when I tell them " it is a BlackBerry, their first android device, and look at this... " (then show them the slide out keyboard). ..they say Oh, I did not know they still made phones" and often add something like "that's pretty cool."
    techvisor likes this.
    04-05-16 03:27 PM
  5. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    ... I don't believe that Chen is serious about exiting HW. I just think he says this to keep the media off his back while he's working at making HW profitable.
    - I think Chen wants to be able to offer clients an end-to-end solution that includes HW..
    .
    EXACTLY.

    Even though regarding devices, BlackBerry has one foot on a banana peel and the other in a grave, dropping bb10 dis qualifies them as the most secure mobile system, because they would no longer be end to end. There is no way around it, and Chen knows it.

    I know a whole lot about security, aside from IT/IS. Fortunately, some guys here fill that gap nicely.
    If BlackBerry stopS being end-end, I imagine it becoming a sure thing for Apple or even Microsoft to dominate enterprise, due to them being the only other players that offer a true end-end experience.

    To be the armchair CEO for a moment, I think Chen should just drop the charade regarding device numbers, state plainly that they will be bb10 for high security only, android for others, narrow the form factors, and launch only two of each device as refresh stock per year; all along working on the 'other' devices, that some here have already mentioned to slowly bring up the quarterly counts without the pressure.

    What's the old expression about trying to please everybody???
    04-05-16 03:46 PM
  6. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    My experience is that more people do not (did not) know they exist than do until I show them my Priv. Then they say something like "Hey, what kind of phone is that you have?" and when I tell them " it is a BlackBerry, their first android device, and look at this... " (then show them the slide out keyboard). ..they say Oh, I did not know they still made phones" and often add something like "that's pretty cool."
    It was the same for the Passport...

    If BlackBerry had a marketing department.. they would have come up with a display (even just cardboard) that highlighted the pop open effect of the PRIV, and given it to most of the major market carriers. And it would have held two dummy devices, one open and one closed.



    Of course that alone would have cost more than they made selling 300K PRIVs, and probably would not have been enough to overcome the sticker shock.
    04-05-16 03:59 PM
  7. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    they say Oh, I did not know they still made phones" and often add something like "that's pretty cool."
    And they immediately go out and don't buy one for themselves.
    04-05-16 04:04 PM
  8. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    ...
    Great stuff Corbu!

    That last paragraph is definite. The Canuck gov't would allow Samsung in, but not the Chinese.
    S. Korea is under the protective umbrella of our CommonWealth forces. Simply put, if there were to be any security-related shenanigans with Canadian, US, Australia, UK, etc. Governments, that gate that holds N. Korea from mowing down S. Korea may mysteriously be opened.
    I image that this is good incentive for S. Korea (Samsungville) to play honest.

    I think the JV between BlackBerry and Samsung may be inevitable, but I personally would like to see a JV between BlackBerry and Microsoft.

    Imagine the Passport 2 built by Nokia, with a true MS Ofiice suite running on it!?
    Sweet.
    04-05-16 04:15 PM
  9. early2bed's Avatar
    To be the armchair CEO for a moment, I think Chen should just drop the charade regarding device numbers, state plainly that they will be bb10 for high security only, android for others, narrow the form factors, and launch only two of each device as refresh stock per year; all along working on the 'other' devices, that some here have already mentioned to slowly bring up the quarterly counts without the pressure.
    So at what point are you undermining most of your MDM offerings when you say "We have BB10 for our high security implementations. For everything else we have our MDM management systems." Is this the right message when clients come to you to provide mobile device security?
    app_Developer and gg22 like this.
    04-05-16 04:31 PM
  10. ZayDub's Avatar
    I thought the BB10 fb app was supposed to not function after 3/31/16 but mine still works fine. What about you all?

    Tour 9630 > Bold 9650 > Q10 > Playbook > Classic AND Passport SE!!!
    04-05-16 04:42 PM
  11. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    I thought the BB10 fb app was supposed to not function after 3/31/16 but mine still works fine. What about you all?

    Tour 9630 > Bold 9650 > Q10 > Playbook > Classic AND Passport SE!!!
    Fine on my Passport...

    Posted via CB10
    ZayDub and Superfly_FR like this.
    04-05-16 04:43 PM
  12. ZayDub's Avatar
    Fine on my Passport...

    Posted via CB10
    Thanks... Glad I didn't do the suggested update on either of my devices

    Tour 9630 > Bold 9650 > Q10 > Playbook > Classic AND Passport SE!!!
    04-05-16 04:45 PM
  13. Sigewif's Avatar
    And they immediately go out and don't buy one for themselves.
    They don't buy one for themselves, often because, when they were ready to buy they did not know it existed or was coming out soon and were not marketed to. I knew because I am one of those people who scours the internet to find what I am looking for, and I had been looking for a slider phone with a PKB in hopes that one existed. I have a friend who always used BlackBerry and I was waiting for the Priv to be released. I told him about it coming out but he went and bought an iphone. Now he wishes he had known more, and sooner. I think he would have bought a Priv. Even more disturbing, after it was first announced as the Venice, I went to 3 different independent cell phone stores that sell phones, contracts, and do repair. Not one of them had heard about it. I mentioned before that I think they must have thought I had stepped out of a time machine. It is kind of awkward when I know more than these people. Isn't it possible to somehow reach even these people, somehow? Finally a new place has opened and when I was in there he did know about the Priv.
    Last edited by Sigewif; 04-05-16 at 07:46 PM.
    CDM76 likes this.
    04-05-16 05:19 PM
  14. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    " poor choices like the watch" < in less than 6 months they have more than 50% of the total market, which has been around for 4 years. Tell Samsung, Sony, Pebble, HTC, Motorola and many more that smartwatches are a poor choice, because they are already fighting for scraps now
    Regarding your first point about Apple selling 30M devices... my question would be how many of those sales were to new users? I can't count how many times I have heard someone say "my iPhone is broken. I guess I'll just get another of the same".
    Fact is, you could pick up any of the latest smartphones, and be impressed. Apple doesn't own that 'wow factor' anymore, unless you think fingerprint scanners are all that.

    Many here see Apple as a company with an almost supernatural hold on users, for no other reason than a mystic impression in people's minds that keep people returning to the same-ol' same-ol.

    Regarding the smart watches. I doubt that all of the said manufacturers are doing it for mere profit. I think it is much a loss-leader that keeps the competition level high in the race to the bottom, with said players holding a torch that's reads "me too!"

    Last, if we are talking real profit in margin, then perhaps we should be discussing OEM accessories for the devices (ie: cases and chargers). Most hold between 700 to a 1000 percent.
    Last edited by Bacon Munchers; 04-05-16 at 06:40 PM.
    04-05-16 05:27 PM
  15. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    So at what point are you undermining most of your MDM offerings when you say "We have BB10 for our high security implementations. For everything else we have our MDM management systems." Is this the right message when clients come to you to provide mobile device security?
    That is the golden question that nobody either wants to address, or knows the answer to. We can all only speculate. I think someone here mentioned that a ton of enterprise users don't care/know about security, and I agree with that on the premise that ignorance is bliss.

    Government and high agencies, on the other hand, usually have a different view.
    Of course, we have all seen the outcome of what happens when highly secure agencies get careless too. Just ask Chancellor Merkel, or perhaps Mrs. Clinton.
    sidhuk and masterful like this.
    04-05-16 06:36 PM
  16. Corbu's Avatar
    OT: Apple and Samsung not out of the woods...
    Huawei Makes Push to Get Ahead of Apple, Samsung in Smartphone Market - WSJ

    Chinese firm plans to unveil a phone with a dual-lens camera that promises better color, sharper contrast

    A Chinese telecommunications giant founded by a former engineer of the People’s Liberation Army is about to take a shot at challenging Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. in the global smartphone market.

    During an event in London on Wednesday, Huawei Technologies Co., the world’s third-biggest smartphone maker by shipments, will unveil a new high-end smartphone with a dual-lens camera, people familiar with the matter said, beating Apple and Samsung to the market with the feature that promises better color and sharper contrasts even in lowlight conditions.

    Engineers from Shenzhen-based Huawei and German optics company Leica Camera AG worked together for nearly a year to develop the camera, the people said.

    The new phone, called the P9, is the latest salvo in Huawei’s five-year battle to transform its mobile handset business from a manufacturer of cheap phones to one that can compete with the industry’s top players. Huawei is using a strategy few Chinese firms have pulled off: pushing its products upmarket to build a global brand. To do so, it is ramping up research and development as well as spending on marketing.

    “We want to become No. 1 as a premium brand,” said Richard Yu, Huawei’s consumer electronics chief, in an interview, adding that Huawei plans to launch a flagship phone in the U.S. later this year.

    The push has seen some early success. Huawei’s smartphone shipments rose 44% to more than 100 million units last year, according to research firm IDC. Huawei said its consumer-gadget revenue jumped 73% last year to $20 billion. Huawei logged $9.2 billion in R&D spending in 2015, higher than the $8.1 billion Apple reported spending.

    But Huawei still has a long way to go. Its global smartphone market share in the fourth quarter was 8.1%, behind Samsung’s 21% and Apple’s 19%, according to IDC.

    The challenge is greater in markets like the U.K. and Germany where carriers’ subsidies have traditionally made Apple and Samsung phones more affordable, reducing Huawei’s price advantage. Its brand image is also a potential liability in the U.S., where its networking equipment business has effectively been banned since a 2012 congressional report cited concerns that the Chinese firm’s gear could be used by Beijing to spy on Americans. Huawei has repeatedly denied such allegations.

    Fortunes in the global smartphone market can also quickly rise and fall. Other Chinese rivals that briefly took the global No. 3 sales post—including low-cost manufacturer Xiaomi Corp. and Lenovo Group Ltd.—haven’t been able to maintain their spots.

    But Huawei’s Mr. Yu said the company can be a long-term force in the industry and it is overhauling its hardware to build more stylish phones.

    “The weak part for Huawei is that we need time to build our brand,” Mr. Yu said.

    Five years ago, Huawei phones looked inexpensive and had power buttons, volume keys and jacks all at random locations, said Huawei’s creative director, Joonsuh Kim, whom Mr. Yu hired in 2012. Mr. Kim, who previously helped design Samsung’s Galaxy smartphones, opted for metal rather than plastic and has been overseeing the design of Huawei flagship phones including the new P9.

    To cut costs and gain more control over the phone’s performance and the timing of product upgrades, Huawei developed its own processors just as Apple and Samsung have done—a strategy not adopted by most of their competitors.

    According to analyses by research firm IHS, the total material and assembly cost of Huawei’s P8—a $530 flagship phone released last year—came to $206, compared to $188 for the iPhone 6S and $284 for Samsung’s Galaxy S6 Edge. None of the companies disclose material and assembly costs.

    Huawei has also used high-end components from suppliers that also work with Apple. And it has added features like fingerprint sensors and pressure-sensitive touch screens, as Samsung and Apple have done.

    But some current and former employees say Huawei has been conservative in its designs, at times reluctant to push beyond templates established by other firms.

    “The next step is to say, ‘Okay, we have understood what we need to understand. Now we are the ones setting the course,’” said Mathieu Lehanneur, who joined Huawei last year to run a Paris-based design-research center.

    Mr. Yu also scrapped Huawei’s previous strategy of supplying cheap nonbranded phones to carriers and started selling Huawei-branded phones directly to consumers through retailers.

    Most carriers and retailers in Europe were initially reluctant to sell Huawei-branded phones. In Italy and Spain, Huawei persuaded retailers by promising to pay for in-store promotions and offering sales training sessions, according to Huawei employees and retailers. It also flew executives from major European retailers to Shenzhen for a factory tour and for an awards ceremony to honor top sellers, according to people who attended.

    The strategy has worked. In Western Europe, Huawei’s smartphone shipments rose 51% last year, faster than Samsung’s 2% growth and Apple’s 15%, according to IDC. In Italy and Spain, Huawei’s smartphone market share rose to 11% and 12% in the fourth quarter, respectively, from roughly 3% three years ago.

    To increase its visibility to high-end consumers, Huawei more than doubled its advertising spending in Italy last year and sponsored a party during Milan’s Fall Fashion Week to celebrate Vogue China’s 10th anniversary.

    With new products like the P9, Mr. Yu is under pressure to win more consumers who can afford to buy high-end Samsung and Apple phones.

    At Huawei’s annual management meeting in Shenzhen in January, Chief Executive Ren Zhengfei, the former PLA engineer who founded the company in 1987, announced his bold wish to quintuple its revenue from consumer gadgets to $100 billion in five years, according to people who heard his speech.

    Mr. Yu responded that a more realistic target would be around $60 billion or $70 billion. Mr. Ren, with a smile, responded to Mr. Yu: “$100 billion.”
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-huawei_market_share.jpgThe BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-huawei_revenue.jpgThe BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-huawei_rnd.jpgThe BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-huawei_selling_price.jpg
    04-05-16 07:53 PM
  17. early2bed's Avatar
    LOL. Each one of these companies spends more twice as much on R&D each year as BBRY is worth - the entire company. So, what kind of innovations are going to keep BlackBerry in the smartphone race?
    sati01 likes this.
    04-05-16 09:44 PM
  18. kadakn01's Avatar
    LOL. Each one of these companies spends more twice as much on R&D each year as BBRY is worth - the entire company. So, what kind of innovations are going to keep BlackBerry in the smartphone race?
    How much did Microsoft spend on R&D in Phones? How innovative were they and how did they do?
    The reality is that this is much more than just spending money. BBRY spent quite a bit on the Z10 and we know how that turned out. The passport and Priv were some of the most innovative phones.
    Remember one important aspect of BBRY is the large Margin of Safety this company has. Cash flow from operations are consistently positive under Chen and while some here and there say he is not spending enough, the reality is he has taken the risk out of the balance sheet and they are in a position to pay down all of the convertible debt and have tons of liquidity to run the company. He spent over a Billion on acquisitions just in the past 2 years. Just because the share price may not be reflective of the value he is creating, it does not mean it is not there. This remains one of the most undervalued names in the mkt, and I no longer worry about the company being insolvent.

    Posted on my Priv
    Last edited by kadakn01; 04-05-16 at 11:06 PM.
    04-05-16 10:20 PM
  19. harryfang36's Avatar
    absolutely right! i bought blackberry phone and their stock as well. It's because im fully confident to their company future! hehe
    CDM76, Superfly_FR, rarsen and 1 others like this.
    04-06-16 12:06 AM
  20. Klipspringers Shoes's Avatar
    How much did Microsoft spend on R&D in Phones? How innovative were they and how did they do?
    The reality is that this is much more than just spending money. BBRY spent quite a bit on the Z10 and we know how that turned out. The passport and Priv were some of the most innovative phones.
    Remember one important aspect of BBRY is the large Margin of Safety this company has. Cash flow from operations are consistently positive under Chen and while some here and there say he is not spending enough, the reality is he has taken the risk out of the balance sheet and they are in a position to pay down all of the convertible debt and have tons of liquidity to run the company. He spent over a Billion on acquisitions just in the past 2 years. Just because the share price may not be reflective of the value he is creating, it does not mean it is not there. This remains one of the most undervalued names in the mkt, and I no longer worry about the company being insolvent.

    Posted on my Priv
    I know it's common to cite the Z10 and say spending on advertising doesn't work, but the Z10 failed because of a number of factors. One could argue that they didn't spend enough on advertising to introduce a brand new OS because even a few years after the release, the overwhelming majority of people either didn't know the Z10 existed, or that the OS was different than the old OS. The advertising money that WAS spent was spent very poorly indeed, and I'm still not convinced that they spent all that much anyway.

    The main problem with the Z10 was the price. It was virtually the same price as the brand new iPhone and Galaxy. You had a new phone with a new OS, a serious app gap, and extremely negative sales persons actively trying to dissuade people from buying it. In that environment, the price was an insanity. From Day One, BlackBerry neglected to go for user base over short term profit, and they ended up getting neither as a result. It was utter folly. BlackBerry needed to launch the phone at a price just below the point where customers would be willing to give the new BlackBerry a chance while saving a bit of money. That is something that should have involved a focus group, but it was never done. They slapped an absurd price on it, and may as well have hammered a nail through it instead.

    Those of us who owned a Z10 from Day One know that it was a phone that could sell, because many of us ended up 'selling' it to loads of friends and family.

    If only...

    If only BlackBerry had gone after users over profit with the Z10 and Q10 (and skipped the awful Q5 altogether) and the Z30, things would have been set up quite nicely for the Passport, and BlackBerry 10 would absolutely have got some of the big names missing apps to sign on. As it happened, the big apps saw no growth, and made no investment, and doomed BlackBerry to no growth, rinse, repeat.

    Perhaps it really is too late now, and God knows the current chiefs haven't got the will or ability to change tactics now anyway. Still, it didn't have to be like this, and those who talk of the inevitability of failure underestimate the quality of BlackBerry's products and plaster over some groundbreaking acts of business lunacy that will be studied in textbooks for years to come.

    Posted via CB10
    CDM76 and ZayDub like this.
    04-06-16 03:12 AM
  21. TGIS's Avatar
    Come on. I am not a 'short'. Even if I were, and I'm not, there would be zero value in posting messages in here. This thread has about zero effect on the stock market. Let's be sensible. My concern is with the stock price and the company. I believe in the potential and vital importance of the HW division, and I don't think Chen is poor CEO for BlackBerry, despite his strengths, and I think he is doing a very poor job indeed as regards HW especially. That is my opinion based on the evidence, and I am open to civilised debate and disagreement. Such discussion can only help us as investors and supporters of BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    Whoops. Wrong word. I meant 'bear'

     Z10 STL100-3/10.3.2.2876
    04-06-16 03:49 AM
  22. Klipspringers Shoes's Avatar
    Let's please not engage in ad hominem attacks. You are welcome - indeed, invited - to disagree with my statements, and to put forth your own opposing arguments, hopefully including rational argument and evidence. In doing so, we both help each other to become more thoughtful and informed investors. Whether or not I am a bear or a squirrel or a wildebeest is an irrelevance. Let's be grown-ups.

    Posted via CB10
    gilmanhlee likes this.
    04-06-16 04:09 AM
  23. DeRedder's Avatar
    04-06-16 04:20 AM
  24. _dimi_'s Avatar
    But you have to wait for actual sales to account for revenue? Or are we just going to assume they can continue to ask 480 euros for this in a few weeks/months time?

    Posted via CB10
    morganplus8 likes this.
    04-06-16 05:01 AM
  25. _dimi_'s Avatar
    With the SE (not Passport, but iPhone) Apple has accepted the iPhone is nothing more but a commodity nowadays. Let's see how long it takes for iPhone prices to reflect their 'new' strategy, which is imho deteriorating to their brand.

    Might be of interest :
    Apple had a services revenue of 5.5 billion in their latest quarter. (iTunes, Apple Music, App Store. Licensing, Service Parts, iCloud, Apple Pay) That's approx. 7% of their total revenue.

    Posted via CB10
    rarsen, morganplus8 and 3MIKE like this.
    04-06-16 05:14 AM
105,364 ... 38813882388338843885 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Does the Motion have the paratek antenna?
    By Steve Pogue in forum BlackBerry Motion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-13-18, 12:33 AM
  2. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-23-17, 11:06 PM
  3. Will Hub+ work on the new Google Pixelbook?
    By danosman in forum BlackBerry HUB+ Suite
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-02-17, 07:42 AM
  4. BlackBerry highlights the impact of KRACK vulnerability on BlackBerry products
    By CrackBerry News in forum CrackBerry.com News Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-30-17, 03:10 PM
  5. Hub and Viber notifications broken
    By LyoobaBerry in forum BlackBerry HUB+ Suite
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-30-17, 02:54 PM

Tags for this Thread

LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD