View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.66%
  • No

    413 37.34%
  1. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    If you watched the recent congressional hearings, I did, the FBI director was asked by a congressman who previously worked for a security company why the FBI didn't clone the phones memory, thereby giving them multiple attempts at failures if necessary. The FBI director did his hummana hummanas and said I have to check with my people who tell me we can't do this without Apple's help.

    Would I be surprised that the company this Congressman had previously worked for then approached the FBI and told them that they could do this, having heard the testimony that they had not considered it? When I read the story about the FBI now saying they no longer need Apple's help, that's what came into my mind. Most likely the FBI isn't going to tell us how they get in.

    I am not sure if this blows away the "marketing cover" or not. You need to have physical access to the phone, pull the memory modules out, clone them, then do multiple brute force attempts until in.
    And the brute force could be easier, they more they know about the suspects. As most of us do use personal information in our passwords.
    03-22-16 11:52 AM
  2. bbjdog's Avatar
    'Twas the week before ER, when all through the thread
    Not a creature was stirring, not even a CJ;
    The options were bought by the shorts who dare,
    In hopes that the Bear Raid soon would be there;
    The Fudsters were ready all smug in their heads;
    While visions of infractions danced in their heads;
    Worth a repost:

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Corbu, Mr BBRY, bungaboy and 2 others like this.
    03-22-16 12:43 PM
  3. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    'Twas the week before ER [...]
    But the force, even busy, is there,
    In the shadow and undue times,
    Won't let them carry guns anytime

    Cheers gang !
    SF
    03-22-16 02:09 PM
  4. smart548's Avatar
    Another truly sad day for us Europeans :

    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/03/22/bruss...ce-brexit.html



    Posted via CB10
    Corbu, bungaboy, rarsen and 1 others like this.
    03-22-16 04:02 PM
  5. bbjdog's Avatar
    Brussels our thoughts are with you and the rest of the world in this fight against evil and the cowards who attack the innocent people!

    http://www.vox.com/2016/3/22/1128580...s-eiffel-tower

    To bad the CN Tower image isn't that great.

    https://vine.co/v/ipAhenjAF7w

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Last edited by bbjdog; 03-22-16 at 08:22 PM.
    03-22-16 06:14 PM
  6. Corbu's Avatar
    OT, but of interest to most of us, I suspect:
    Amazon and Biotech Are Ruining the Year for the Nasdaq - WSJ

    Tech-oriented index is down 3.7% in 2016, while Dow industrials and S&P 500 have gained

    The stock-market rally has left the Nasdaq behind.

    While the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 have recovered from drops earlier this year, the Nasdaq Composite Index still is in the red. The index chipped away at its deficit with a 0.3% gain Tuesday, as the Dow industrials and S&P edged lower, but the Nasdaq remains down 3.7% in 2016.

    The Dow and S&P 500 are up 0.9% and 0.3%, respectively, this year.

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-mi-co779c_nasda_16u_20160322135106.jpg

    The decline in the tech-oriented index is another example of how investors have shied away from risk amid uncertainty about global growth and the state of the U.S. economy. The Nasdaq outperformed its peers on the way up after the financial crisis. But the areas that helped it surge have lagged behind this year, raising concerns about whether the broader U.S. stock-market rally has the fuel to keep going.

    More than half of the Nasdaqs decline this year can be attributed to 10 companies of the composites roughly 2,600 market-cap-weighted components, according to data from stock-market research firm Birinyi Associates.

    Amazon.com Inc. is responsible for almost one-fifth of the decline, thanks to a 17% drop in 2016. That is a change from last year, when strong gains from a handful of the Nasdaqs largest components, including Amazon, helped lift the index above the S&P 500 and Dow industrials. The company trades at 443 times the last 12 months of earnings as of Monday, according to FactSet.

    Amazon, which rose $6.50, or 1.2%, to $560.48, Tuesday, has been an investor favorite in recent years along with big tech firms, including Facebook Inc., Netflix Inc. and Google parent Alphabet Inc. Of those four, only Facebook is up this year. Microsoft Corp.s 2.5% decline also has weighed on the Nasdaq, according to Birinyi.

    Marking another reversal, seven of the 10 biggest drags on the index are biotech or health-care stocks. Biotech stocks have lured investors with the potential for outsize gains that can follow research breakthroughs, with the Nasdaq Biotechnology Index posting double-digit-percentage increases the past seven years.

    But biotechs also are prone to sharp pullbacks. One came in late 2015, after presidential candidate Hillary Clinton tweeted about price gouging in the industry and released a proposal for controlling drug costs, which has become a topic in the campaign. The index, which rose 2.6% Tuesday, hasnt reached the same levels since.

    The Nasdaq has lagged simply because some of the speculative growth stories, especially biotech, havent really regained favor, said Brian Jacobsen, chief portfolio strategist at Wells Fargo Funds Management, which manages about $248 billion in assets. Investors may be looking for real and provable growth rather than wishful growth.

    Other worries have stemmed from troubles at Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc., which expanded rapidly by buying companies. Valeants stock has lost nearly 90% of its value since August amid concerns about its business and accounting practices. Shares fell again last week after Valeant cut its outlook for the year and said it was in danger of defaulting on some debt.

    Investors also sold other specialty pharmaceutical firms whose businesses resemble Valeants, and some analysts said the turmoil was making investors re-examine the entire sector.

    Between concerns about politics and drug pricing, investors are saying, I can move into something a little safer, said Christian OBrien, who trades health-care stocks at Raymond James.

    The Nasdaq Biotechnology Index is down 22% this year. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc. both have fallen more than 28%. Biogen Inc. and Celgene Corp. are down more than 14%.

    Some investors said the situation could provide some buying opportunities.

    Craig Sterling, head of equity research at Pioneer Investments, which manages about $235 billion in global assets, said some health-care stocks have gotten crazy cheap, despite a weak short-term outlook. Mr. Sterling said he is looking hard at adding to health-care positions.

    The Nasdaq Biotechnology Index was trading at 16.9 times the last 12 months of earnings as of Monday, cheaper than the S&P 500s 18.3 price/earnings ratio and down from its average of 25.2 since 2011, according to FactSet.

    The market has gone through a period this year with people asking, What is this really worth? But these are all good businesses, Mr. Sterling said.

    Other investors said the Nasdaq Composite is poised for a rebound. Jim Tierney, chief investment officer for concentrated U.S. growth at AllianceBernstein, said that with economic fears receding, many are looking anew at more economically sensitive companies, setting up openings for stock pickers.

    At some point people will start to refocus their attention on the Nasdaq, and, more importantly, specific stocks, he said.
    bbjdog, morganplus8, 3MIKE and 8 others like this.
    03-22-16 08:36 PM
  7. Corbu's Avatar
    GM to Use External Reports to Strengthen Cybersecurity - WSJ

    Reports used to understand how vulnerabilities were identified and fix the problem

    General Motors Co. has received “three dozen or so” reports of potential information-security vulnerabilities in its vehicles as part of a public disclosure program the auto maker instituted to solicit help in recent months.

    Kevin Baltes, a cybersecurity director at the nation’s largest auto maker, said the reports are part of feedback received from the public on potential security risks. Mr. Baltes, speaking at an automotive security summit outside Detroit on Tuesday, said the company uses those reports to begin a relationship, understand how vulnerabilities were identified and fix the problem identified.

    The practice comes as auto makers look to plug potential cybersecurity risks that vehicles face as they become more connected via in-cabin Internet or cellular connections.

    Chris Valasek, who recently became security leader at Uber Technologies Inc.’s advanced technology center, made waves last summer when he and an associate hacked into a Jeep. On Tuesday, he told conference attendees that hackers have spent heavily to learn how to crack into cars and trucks.

    “There is a reason car hacking isn’t profitable right now,” Mr. Valasek said. But a rise in the development of mobile applications specifically designed for automobiles could change that. Such development could give a foothold for “malicious apps.”

    “If one in a million click through, then you win,” he said.

    The auto industry’s push to add more of the camera- and radar-based safety gear that are building blocks for autonomous driving, and the increasing connection between a vehicle’s dashboard and a driver’s smartphone are two trends often cited as reason for increased cyberrisks.

    GM earlier this year invited computer researchers to essentially hack its vehicles. The effort is type of so-called “bug bounty” programs run by companies. GM isn’t offering cash but promises not to take legal action against hackers so long as they don’t disclose any vulnerabilities until GM gives the green light.

    Other requirements: hackers can’t cause harm to anyone; can’t compromise the privacy of customers or GM operations; don’t break the law; confirm they aren’t located in countries such as Iran or North Korea; and confirm they aren’t prohibited from doing business in the U.S.

    Researchers not affiliated with GM last year demonstrated an ability to commandeer controls of a moving Jeep from a laptop miles away, leading parent Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV to recall more than a million vehicles.

    No one was injured and Fiat Chrysler quickly fixed the problem. Most vehicle hacks have involved researchers with extended access to vehicles, as opposed to those randomly driving in traffic. But such demonstrations are fueling concerns among safety advocates, regulators and Capitol Hill lawmakers that both controls and private information linked to a vehicle’s technology could be vulnerable to cyberattacks.

    GM suffered a mild attack last year when a researcher demonstrated an ability to remotely locate, unlock or start a car using the auto maker’s OnStar smartphone system by installing a gadget underneath the vehicle. GM quickly addressed the problem and alerted consumers to the fix without a formal recall. Researchers have also hacked a Tesla Motors Inc. car. The electric-car maker issued a security update.
    bbjdog, morganplus8, 3MIKE and 5 others like this.
    03-22-16 08:48 PM
  8. 3MIKE's Avatar
    To read bought a lot of joy
    That poem from bungaboy
    👏 lol
    Corbu, bbjdog, Mr BBRY and 4 others like this.
    03-22-16 08:50 PM
  9. Corbu's Avatar
    OT: FBI vs Apple
    Apple Win in iPhone Case Comes With Cost - WSJ

    FBI’s claim of an alternate way into locked iPhone raises security concerns

    The Justice Department’s move to postpone a highly anticipated showdown with Apple Inc. over unlocking a terrorist’s iPhone appears to be a victory for Apple.

    But it comes at a cost: the suggestion that there may be a gap in the software protecting the contents of recent iPhones.

    Since 2014, Apple has said that it had no way of breaking into phones using the most recent versions of its software. In resisting the government’s order, Apple argued that creating software to do so could endanger all of its customers. Late Monday, the government postponed the case, saying it was investigating a method for getting into the phone without Apple’s help.

    “This suggests that the very thing that Apple feared already exists in some form and it exists outside of the walls of Cupertino,” said Edward McAndrew, a partner at law firm Ballard Spahr and a former federal prosecutor in Virginia.

    U.S. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym late Monday suspended her Feb. 16 order that Apple help investigators unlock the iPhone of Syed Rizwan Farook, who along with his wife killed 14 people in the Dec. 2 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, Calif.

    Judge Pym postponed indefinitely a hearing scheduled for Tuesday, averting a high-stakes showdown between Apple and the Justice Department in a closely watched case over the balance between security and privacy in the smartphone era.

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s new method for potentially unlocking the phone, and its author, remained unclear Tuesday. The government said the “outside party” that brought it the information wasn’t from the U.S. government. A law-enforcement official said the government is still testing the method, but is cautiously optimistic that it will unlock Mr. Farook’s phone without Apple’s help.

    During the telephone conference call with Judge Pym on Monday, Apple lawyer Theodore Boutrous urged the judge to suspend or revoke her order, in part because he said the government had implied that Apple had done something wrong in creating its encryption and opposing the government’s order, according to a transcript.

    Tracy Wilkinson, an assistant U.S. Attorney, said vacating the order would be premature because the new method might not work. “There have been a lot of people who have reached out to us during this litigation with proposed alternate methods, and one by one they have failed for one reason or another,” said Ms. Wilkinson.

    The disclosure also underscores a troubling reality for Apple: It is in law enforcement’s best interests to not only find and exploit vulnerabilities, but keep that information out of the company’s hands.

    Apple executives have said repeatedly that securing its technology is a constant arms race and that no software is impenetrable.

    “This will become another tool in the FBI’s surveillance arsenal until the vulnerability is found and patched,” said Casey Ellis, chief executive and co-founder of cybersecurity firm Bugcrowd.

    That runs counter to federal policies encouraging companies to share information about security flaws in software, so they can be fixed. The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team was created in 2003 as a central repository of the nation’s knowledge of security bugs, and a place where federal agencies, security researchers and the private sector can coordinate the nation’s response to cyberthreats.

    Monday, the government said it knows about a potential gap in the software protecting Apple’s iPhones. But the government isn’t telling anyone, at least for now.

    To some, the revelation shifted a key question in the case, from whether Apple has a responsibility to help law enforcement unlock a terrorist’s iPhone to whether law enforcement has a responsibility to help Apple protect its customers from a potential vulnerability in the iPhone.

    “The last entity that the FBI will tell is Apple,” said Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed an amicus brief supporting Apple’s opposition to the judge’s order.

    Security experts speculated about several ways that the iPhone could be breached. One scenario is that there is a previously undisclosed bug among the few pieces of software that the government could access on Mr. Farook’s phone, such as the “boot loader” code that the iPhone uses to start up its iOS operating system.

    Another possibility: hardware hacking. Technicians could de-solder the iPhone’s encrypted memory chip and insert a test socket where the memory had been. Then they would copy the encrypted data to memory chips, slide them, one-at-a-time into the test socket and try to guess Mr. Farook’s 4-digit passcode. It would take as many as 10,000 guesses to determine the passcode, and the iPhone only allows 10 tries, but by repeatedly loading the data onto a flash chip, the FBI would essentially reset the counter. This technique would require about $50,000 in equipment and take as little as two days, according to an estimate made by Daniel Kahn Gillmor, a technology fellow with the ACLU.

    A more expensive scenario—this one costing between $500,000 and $1 million—would use a focused ion beam to probe the iPhone’s microprocessor, extracting cryptographic information that could then be used to decrypt the phone’s data. That technique would require several months of very precise work, where any misstep could render the phone unreadable.

    On Capitol Hill Tuesday, Rep. Ted Lieu (D., Calif.) said he found the FBI’s actions in the case “extremely disconcerting,” noting that it filed the case against Apple before exhausting all of its options and then asked to delay the hearing before knowing whether its new method of unlocking the phone will work.

    “Either there was a tremendous lack of due diligence or the FBI wasn’t particularly interested in this iPhone and they were using a horrific tragedy to try to set a precedent,” Mr. Lieu said.

    The FBI declined to comment on the remarks.
    03-22-16 09:29 PM
  10. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    So much lipstick on this piece it's hard to read. Priv sales are pulled forward due to sell in so reducing full year estimates? Does this make sense to anyone?

    Morgan might get his sub 8 entry for those calls this morning...

    Posted via CB10


    What really puzzles me is that the likes of these dirt bags crash the stock, then swiftly pickup shares.
    How is this legal!?
    morganplus8, 3MIKE, rarsen and 3 others like this.
    03-23-16 01:25 AM
  11. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    That's your concern....

    I just don't think most consumers really believe that the goverment couldn't do it to begin with, so I doubt the FBI suddenly dropping the hearing with Apple is going to affect sales. And I don't think investors think that either. They see a new product that will open Apple up to a new level of the smartphone market and an opportunity for Apple to increase sales and revenues.

    The only way that really matters to BBRY is that Apple has been moving in on their existing customer base. But until the process of unlocking that phone is known and if it would apply to managed devices... it means very little. Their unlocking the phone may have more to do with examining the screen to see where it's worn the most, maybe they found the guys logon data on his computer?
    I doubt most folks could elaborate on the discussion either way.
    Yes, forensics can crack anything, incl our prized BlackBerry, but it takes expensive resources, and most importantly, it cannot be water marked as evidence unless they use the governing laws. The FBI was making a public attempt to shoehorn the issue with encryption. I doubt the matter with encryption governance is over, even if the FBI chooses to cease their pursuit on this particular issue.
    The conspiracy behind most hand sets being 'open mics' is actually true, but again, how can that Intel be used against a citizen in court without crossing boundaries?
    With regard to examining the screen to see where it's worn... that was a common method for pinpad forensics, but with tempered 'Gorilla Glass', it is fairly useless as far as I know, and I haven't heard of that being part of the process. Your point may hold water though, if the device had a veneer over the screen.

    Last, if the FBI really got nowhere with Apple (I doubt it), they could simply claim the device as 'property seized in association with a crime' and make a claim to Apple that it is now owned by the FBI and thus require access.

    Improper handling of evidence...?
    I have drank a few of cold-ones back in the day of police seized alcoh... Nevermind.
    Last edited by Bacon Munchers; 03-23-16 at 02:03 AM.
    Mr BBRY, 3MIKE, bungaboy and 6 others like this.
    03-23-16 01:51 AM
  12. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    But the force, even busy, is there,
    In the shadow and undue times,
    Won't let them carry guns anytime

    Cheers gang !
    SF
    ... isn't there supposed to be a rhyming qualifier for poems!?

    .
    Mr BBRY, 3MIKE, bungaboy and 6 others like this.
    03-23-16 01:59 AM
  13. app_Developer's Avatar
    So much lipstick on this piece it's hard to read. Priv sales are pulled forward due to sell in so reducing full year estimates? Does this make sense to anyone?
    Because devices like this have a sales curve that peaks early and then tapers off as the model ages. So if you pull the curve forward into 4Q16, then in FY17 you're a little further down the tail.

    Now there could be a Priv 2 in FY17 that changes things, but I think we'd all agree that it is too early to model that into any FY17 forecast given that BB doesn't really have a history of getting into any sort of rhythm like that. Maybe that changes with Android, but we don't know that for sure quite yet.
    CDM76 likes this.
    03-23-16 02:53 AM
  14. spiller's Avatar
    What really puzzles me is that the likes of these dirt bags crash the stock, then swiftly pickup shares.
    How is this legal!?
    I guess either buy and hold...or know what you're doing. Yep it's rigged. I picked up more yesterday.

    Posted via CB10
    3MIKE and Bacon Munchers like this.
    03-23-16 06:31 AM
  15. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    http://stks.freshpatents.com/Blackberry-Limited-nm1.php
    Recent patent applications BlackBerry

    Posted via CB10
    Corbu, 3MIKE, bbjdog and 12 others like this.
    03-23-16 07:44 AM
  16. georgeeipi's Avatar
    Why is there a scantily clad female at the head of this thread? Anyone else see that? Or do I have some sort of virus?
    03-23-16 07:59 AM
  17. randall2580's Avatar
    Another possibility: hardware hacking. Technicians could de-solder the iPhone’s encrypted memory chip and insert a test socket where the memory had been. Then they would copy the encrypted data to memory chips, slide them, one-at-a-time into the test socket and try to guess Mr. Farook’s 4-digit passcode. It would take as many as 10,000 guesses to determine the passcode, and the iPhone only allows 10 tries, but by repeatedly loading the data onto a flash chip, the FBI would essentially reset the counter. This technique would require about $50,000 in equipment and take as little as two days, according to an estimate made by Daniel Kahn Gillmor, a technology fellow with the ACLU.
    That is more or less what I heard at the Congressional hearing.
    03-23-16 08:00 AM
  18. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    03-23-16 08:01 AM
  19. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    What really puzzles me is that the likes of these dirt bags crash the stock, then swiftly pickup shares.
    How is this legal!?
    Did u watch "wolf of wall street"? Lol...

    Or this...

    http://seekingalpha.com/instablog/29...e-stock-market



    Posted via CB10
    03-23-16 08:10 AM
  20. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    ... isn't there supposed to be a rhyming qualifier for poems!?

    .
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-ob_53f2a3_tumblr-nir91tghex1rbrhnko1-500.jpg
    uno, dos, tres, quatro

    Edit : X2 : I read "rhythm" !!!
    Last edited by Superfly_FR; 03-23-16 at 08:45 AM.
    bungaboy, bbjdog, W Hoa and 6 others like this.
    03-23-16 08:27 AM
  21. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Why is there a scantily clad female at the head of this thread? Anyone else see that? Or do I have some sort of virus?
    Probably ads ... but, they should be related to your recent searches
    03-23-16 08:29 AM
  22. bungaboy's Avatar
    Probably ads ... but, they should be related to your recent searches
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-sherlock-holmes-007.jpg
    03-23-16 08:38 AM
  23. Corbu's Avatar
    03-23-16 09:43 AM
  24. Corbu's Avatar
    From yesterday:

    03-23-16 10:01 AM
  25. W Hoa's Avatar
    Probably ads ... but, they should be related to your recent searches
    I logged on for the first time in days just to 'like' your comment.
    03-23-16 10:03 AM
105,335 ... 38583859386038613862 ...

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