View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

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1107. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.60%
  • No

    414 37.40%
  1. bbjdog's Avatar
    Any reason BBRY is down in a rally, with three bullish signs?

     Priv... cue the comeback!
    I know, what's going on with Bbry? The market's are closing at 12:00 noon and bbry stock is down. Geez!

    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    03-01-16 10:47 AM
  2. masterful's Avatar
    Any reason BBRY is down in a rally, with three bullish signs?

     Priv... cue the comeback!
    It will rally this pm

    Posted via my PRIV
    03-01-16 10:51 AM
  3. bigbadben10's Avatar
    Cue the village *diot.

    Posted by my fabulous red Passport
    bbjdog, rarsen, sidhuk and 4 others like this.
    03-01-16 10:53 AM
  4. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    LOL....

    Cue the village *diot.

    Posted by my fabulous red Passport
    La Emperor, bbjdog, sidhuk and 1 others like this.
    03-01-16 12:24 PM
  5. TGIS's Avatar
    It will rally this pm

    Posted via my PRIV

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-images-6-.jpg

     Priv... cue the comeback!
    theRock1975 likes this.
    03-01-16 12:30 PM
  6. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Citron downgrades Tesla.. target 100 USD by years end?

    Posted via CB10
    03-01-16 01:33 PM
  7. 3MIKE's Avatar
    03-01-16 01:50 PM
  8. rarsen's Avatar
    BlackBerry Is Winning In Indonesia
    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/blackb...164719368.html

    BBM is the dominant instant messaging service in Indonesia with 55 million active users. Looking forward, BlackBerry plans to combine e-commerce, advertising and communication capabilities in Indonesia— similar to Tencent Holdings' WeChat's strategy in China.
    "We have seen WeChat in China lead the way in creating an ecosystem around chat in China, Line has also achieved this in Japan and KakaoTalk in Korea," Matthew Talbot, senior vice president at BlackBerry in charge of BBM told The Wall Street Journal. "But none of these players have reached the scale in Indonesia that we have with BBM." "I don't believe there is anyone today in Indonesia that can compete with the ecosystem we are developing, particularly when combined with the scale of our user base," Talbot added.
    03-01-16 02:34 PM
  9. bbjdog's Avatar
    Reading material


    http://blogs.blackberry.com/2016/03/...t-in-the-cold/


    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    03-01-16 06:26 PM
  10. rarsen's Avatar
    OT from the Related Technologies and Security file:

    Apple doesn't have to unlock iPhone, New York judge rules - SC Magazine
    " In a victory that could have long-lasting influence on privacy and more clearly define the boundaries of governmental reach. He noted that the request extended beyond a single case. The future of digital privacy also hangs in the balance, he said. If the government can force companies to weaken the security of their products, then we all lose."
    Orenstein's ruling does not have legal standing with cases pending outside of New York, including the controversial San Bernardino shooter case currently before a magistrate in California, though it could wield some influence.
    03-01-16 06:29 PM
  11. Corbu's Avatar
    OT: Cybersecurity
    Duke Energy CEO: Cyber-Threats Grow; EPA Lawsuit Clarifying - ABC News

    "If I were to share with you the number of attacks that come into the Duke network every day, you would be astounded," Good said during earlier remarks at a breakfast with business leaders. "And it's not from people working out of their garage; it's from nation-states that are trying to penetrate systems."
    03-01-16 07:31 PM
  12. Elephant_Canyon's Avatar
    OT: self driving cars. Until a self driving car can actual think for itself and not be programmed, I'm out!

    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/02/29/googl...nor-crash.html
    In 7 years, over almost a million and a half miles driven, a Google autonomous vehicle has cause a total of one accident (and an incredibly minor one, at that). It's absolutely silly to trust humans to do better, because they never will.

    Holding this article up and saying that self-driving cars are a failure completely ignores the statistical and practical reality that computers are better drivers than people. It's like saying that water is unsafe to drink because someone occasionally dies of water intoxication.
    iamagod likes this.
    03-01-16 07:46 PM
  13. bbjdog's Avatar
    In 7 years, over almost a million and a half miles driven, a Google autonomous vehicle has cause a total of one accident (and an incredibly minor one, at that). It's absolutely silly to trust humans to do better, because they never will.

    Holding this article up and saying that self-driving cars are a failure completely ignores the statistical and practical reality that computers are better drivers than people. It's like saying that water is unsafe to drink because someone occasionally dies of water intoxication.
    Thanks for the facts! Some drivers go a lifetime without an accident, that's equal to your million and a half miles and more.

    We are having nice weather in southern Ontario, so bring that Google car and let's see how better it is! Car got a little confused, right, left, right, left. It's a toy that I will never buy!!!!!!!!

    P.S. Let's keep in mind how many times human intervention occurred.



    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Last edited by bbjdog; 03-01-16 at 09:03 PM.
    03-01-16 08:41 PM
  14. kadakn01's Avatar
    Apple vs. BlackBerry vs. The FBI vs. Bill Gates




    Last decade, Apple pretty much took the smartphone market from BlackBerry and this month it looks like the FBI may be inadvertently helping BlackBerry take it back. Reactions like this indicate that Apple will need to make moves with IBM to ensure that it doesn't lose more of its customer base if it refuses to comply with the court order. It also showcases the strength of BlackBerry's own security strategy in the face of hostile -- or even friendly -- nations.

    Bill Gates even entered the discussion, strangely enough, seemingly on the FBI’s side, though he seemed to rethink this position early this week. This showcases one of the perception problems Apple has in that it seems what the FBI is asking is reasonable, but it actually isn’t. (And then, as I was writing this, a decision came down in New York favoring Apple.)

    Apple vs. BlackBerry

    To suggest that BlackBerry isn’t on Apple’s side in its fight with the FBI would be disingenuous. BlackBerry absolutely agrees with Apple, but it is in a far better position to fight this kind of fight than Apple is. First, its communication servers largely reside in, and are owned by, the organizations that deploy BlackBerries. This means that only in the case of consumer-purchased phones can any law enforcement agency or government force it to provide access to server-based data simply because it doesn’t hold or own the servers that reside on customer sites.

    Consider also that BlackBerry resides in Canada and governments (including the Canadian and American governments) have largely standardized on BlackBerries because they're more secure. Forcing BlackBerry to compromise this security would translate into a government-level security exposure and force a defense by those governments. That's something that Apple doesn’t seem to enjoy.

    I should also point out that BlackBerry phones are fully transparent to the organizations that deploy them. So, in this case, the FBI would have been able to get access to the phone from the government agency that had deployed it and never needed to contact BlackBerry in the first place.

    So while BlackBerry clearly supports Apple, it is in a unique position to benefit from the ongoing drama.

    Bill Gates vs. Tim Cook

    This was kind of fascinating to watch because the difference in positions wasn’t a Microsoft vs. Apple thing, it was an ex-CEO vs. a current CEO thing and it showcased the risk for Apple. Gates hasn’t been a tech company CEO since before the iPhone was launched. In fact, he pretty much preceded smartphones in general -- when he ran Microsoft, flip phones were still far more prevalent. To Gates, the idea of giving someone access to a phone doesn’t seem to be that difficult and he didn’t initially see what the big deal was. It also wouldn’t be a one-time thing because there are a huge number of other iPhones that both domestic and foreign agencies would like to decrypt for anything from criminal and terrorist activities to domestic disputes and internal dissidents. The cost and brand damage of all of this on Apple could be massive, but Gates is thinking more like a civilian these days and no longer has the perspective of a current tech CEO.

    This goes to the heart of one of Apple’s big problems and that is that most people aren’t current tech CEOs. They see what appears to be a trivial process against a massive exposure and wonder why Apple isn’t conforming. This kind of thinking could actually get a ruling in Congress that Apple doesn’t want and iPhone users, if they understood it, wouldn’t want either. But the “understanding” part is proving very difficult because currently more U.S. citizens support the FBI than support Apple (but it is really close). Apparently even iPhone owners mostly support the FBI, which is clearly very problematic for Apple.

    Wrapping Up

    Apple needs to move the security component that is being challenged from software to hardware, which would make it nearly impossible for even Apple to open up these phones. It needs to implement business-hosted communications and management servers, which IBM can help with, in order to get out of having to provide anyone with anyone else’s information. This would put the responsibility on the phone owners and not on Apple. And, finally, it needs the support of the U.S. government in the way that BlackBerry has the support of the Canadian government. If not, it needs to think about moving phone leadership and operations to a country that will supply it with that defensive support. If it doesn’t do this soon, it will eventually have its phones compromised and that could be the end of much of Apple’s iPhone business.
    Mr BBRY, bungaboy, rarsen and 2 others like this.
    03-01-16 11:06 PM
  15. kadakn01's Avatar
    03-01-16 11:33 PM
  16. jake simmons3's Avatar
    I see little the UK government can do to force none UK companies to comply. China firewall? Look how well that's working out. I don't see apple or whatsapp being 'ok UK we will either rewrite our software or write in a back door'. What are they going to do ban the sale and import of apple products? Even harder some how block the download of any whatsapp apk?

    Goodluck UK if this bill ever gets passed.

    Posted via CB10
    03-02-16 12:59 AM
  17. BanffMoose's Avatar
    I see little the UK government can do to force none UK companies to comply. China firewall? Look how well that's working out. I don't see apple or whatsapp being 'ok UK we will either rewrite our software or write in a back door'. What are they going to do ban the sale and import of apple products? Even harder some how block the download of any whatsapp apk?

    Goodluck UK if this bill ever gets passed.

    Posted via CB10
    If numerous countries can tell BlackBerry to "grant access or get out," why can't they tell Apple and Facebook or any other company the same? If I recall correctly, those governments would've banned BlackBerry at the telco level. No handset sales and no BES traffic allowed.

    Apple, Facebook and other end-to-end encryption IM providers can get around those kinds of bans but only BlackBerry can't?

    Are there big holes in China's great firewall? I thought it worked well enough for their government's purposes. It doesn't have to be perfect, just has to make it very inconvenient to most of the people.

    Posted via CB10
    03-02-16 01:49 AM
  18. Corbu's Avatar
    Thanks, rarsen!

    The WSJ piece, FTR`

    JAKARTA–BlackBerry Ltd. may be struggling to regain relevance in the global smartphone market, but its instant messaging is still a hit in Indonesia.

    Many Indonesians remain loyal to their curated groups of friends and family on BlackBerry Messenger, known as BBM, even though some of them no longer use their BlackBerry devices.

    Take Fredi Ferdianto, a 30-year-old BBM user from the main trading port city of Surabaya in East Java. He says he has four BBM accounts, mainly to manage his online business of selling imported goods from China. Among those four, three run on his BlackBerry devices and one– his personal account– runs on an Android device.

    “I choose BBM because almost everyone [that I know in Indonesia] uses BBM rather than WhatsApp or Line,” Mr. Ferdianto said.

    While globally, Facebook Inc.’s WhatsApp dominates the messaging market with a billion monthly active users, in Indonesia, it’s a different story. BBM has over 55 million monthly active users, BlackBerry said in January, making it the dominant messaging app in Indonesia. WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger trailed behind with around 50 million active users for each app, according to estimates from U.K.-based social media consultancy We Are Social. Facebook, which owns both platforms, doesn’t break down number of users by country and only said that more than 800 million people worldwide now use Messenger. The social network had 82 million monthly active users in Indonesia as of fourth quarter last year, of which 77 million access it through mobile devices, a Facebook spokeswoman said.

    Companies and professionals in Indonesia are also still embracing the BlackBerry for its secure ecosystem, making the Southeast Asian nation BBM’s top market, followed by Nigeria and South Africa.

    Seeking to boost revenue, BlackBerry launched features in 2014 such as an in-app shop that offers stickers and other virtual items, mobile payment, and advertising tools for brands in the form of public channels and sponsored contents. More than 750,000 channels have been created in Indonesia alone, BlackBerry said, including those created by major online retailers who use it to promote their goods and services and engage with consumers. BBM also enables users to pay for goods and virtual items and also works together with multiple mobile wallets. Stickers are also popular among the country’s trend-conscious Internet users: over 1 billion stickers were sent and received each month, BlackBerry said.

    The Waterloo, Canada-based company said that it aims to combine e-commerce, advertising, and chat in Indonesia, much like what Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat has achieved in China.

    “We have seen WeChat in China lead the way in creating an ecosystem around chat in China, Line has also achieved this in Japan and KakaoTalk in Korea,” says Matthew Talbot, senior vice president at BlackBerry in charge of BBM. “But none of these players have reached the scale in Indonesia that we have with BBM.”

    Still, analysts warn that BBM’s dominance could be threatened this year as other messaging platforms offer superior features. Some analysts say BlackBerry should decide what kind of platform it wants to be—a pure chat application like WhatsApp or a multi-function messaging platform like WeChat—and focus on it, in order to maintain its lead in Indonesia.

    “It may be too late for BBM to start trying to do a Facebook Messenger style evolution,” says Jason Mander, director of research and insight at London-based market researcher GlobalWebIndex, referring to more than 700 additional apps specially tailored for Messenger. “In fact, it should probably concentrate on its pure messaging function which prominent in the first place.”

    Some consumers agree.

    “I use Line to make a free call and send stickers to friends,” says Irfan Mulya, who uses BBM, WhatsApp, and Line. “I only use BBM to chat.” The 34-year-old office worker is among many Indonesian lured by Line’s call and sticker features that make it the fourth biggest messaging app here with 30 million users.

    Still, BlackBerry remains confident that it can still uphold its top position in Indonesia, the only market in the world where the app is still winning over other messaging apps.

    “I don’t believe there is anyone today in Indonesia that can compete with the ecosystem we are developing, particularly when combined with the scale of our user base,” Mr. Talbot said.
    03-02-16 06:08 AM
  19. jake simmons3's Avatar
    If numerous countries can tell BlackBerry to "grant access or get out," why can't they tell Apple and Facebook or any other company the same? If I recall correctly, those governments would've banned BlackBerry at the telco level. No handset sales and no BES traffic allowed.

    Apple, Facebook and other end-to-end encryption IM providers can get around those kinds of bans but only BlackBerry can't?

    Are there big holes in China's great firewall? I thought it worked well enough for their government's purposes. It doesn't have to be perfect, just has to make it very inconvenient to most of the people.

    Posted via CB10
    You're making this a BlackBerry vs apple thing for no reason. If BlackBerry really wanted to push the issue they could have. From what a remember it was only Pakistan that was making this threat to BlackBerry and they said ok w.e we will leave. Mainly because it wasn't worth the time or effort to comply or fight. Apple and BlackBerry are two different beasts. Apple is on the level where they could fight something like this from so many different levels. They can go from funding politicians to shoot down a bill like this or flat out deny the request. Short of shutting down the telo towers it will be hard for the UK to stop all encrypted traffic. We are talking about consumer vs corporate, sure the firewall sorta worked for the Chinese government, tell me how did it work for the general public? Not so well. Doesn't seem to be stopping most of the Chinese population that really want around it can get around it. Apple has a lot more pull the BlackBerry does in matters like this.

    Posted via CB10
    zlatno likes this.
    03-02-16 08:08 AM
  20. morganplus8's Avatar
    You're making this a BlackBerry vs apple thing for no reason. If BlackBerry really wanted to push the issue they could have. From what a remember it was only Pakistan that was making this threat to BlackBerry and they said ok w.e we will leave. Mainly because it wasn't worth the time or effort to comply or fight. Apple and BlackBerry are two different beasts. Apple is on the level where they could fight something like this from so many different levels. They can go from funding politicians to shoot down a bill like this or flat out deny the request. Short of shutting down the telo towers it will be hard for the UK to stop all encrypted traffic. We are talking about consumer vs corporate, sure the firewall sorta worked for the Chinese government, tell me how did it work for the general public? Not so well. Doesn't seem to be stopping most of the Chinese population that really want around it can get around it. Apple has a lot more pull the BlackBerry does in matters like this.

    Posted via CB10
    This is after all, a BlackBerry thread and BB has been down this road with India in a big way. BlackBerry could be said to have pioneered the process of pulling out of countries that won't allow it to maintain its privacy. There are others here who will argue that Apple actually doesn't have much security at all, save for its 10 attempts software lockout, there isn't much protection. I wouldn't be able to see so many super stars naked if it weren't for Tim Cook! I like BlackBerry's stand on this issue, it isn't about opening a blanket back door solution, it is about stopping others from killing people. I'm not really looking to get into this but BlackBerry is one of the few companies with a depth of knowledge in this area and willing to put it out there with a policy that everyone seems to buy into. Apple likes the publicity and that's about as far as they have thought about the issue. The Government for its part needs to be realistic and adopt a BlackBerry style of approach where a very select request is made for terrorist conflict situations. BlackBerry has their act together and it appears they have for sometime now. I'm sure Corbu or others can provide you with the list of countries that challenged BlackBerry only to cave in.
    03-02-16 08:39 AM
  21. jake simmons3's Avatar
    This is after all, a BlackBerry thread and BB has been down this road with India in a big way. BlackBerry could be said to have pioneered the process of pulling out of countries that won't allow it to maintain its privacy. There are others here who will argue that Apple actually doesn't have much security at all, save for its 10 attempts software lockout, there isn't much protection. I wouldn't be able to see so many super stars naked if it weren't for Tim Cook! I like BlackBerry's stand on this issue, it isn't about opening a blanket back door solution, it is about stopping others from killing people. I'm not really looking to get into this but BlackBerry is one of the few companies with a depth of knowledge in this area and willing to put it out there with a policy that everyone seems to buy into. Apple likes the publicity and that's about as far as they have thought about the issue. The Government for its part needs to be realistic and adopt a BlackBerry style of approach where a very select request is made for terrorist conflict situations. BlackBerry has their act together and it appears they have for sometime now. I'm sure Corbu or others can provide you with the list of countries that challenged BlackBerry only to cave in.
    I'm not denying any of what you said but you're confusing the issue. We all know BlackBerry security is second to none and apple security can be a joke at some points. This argument has nothing to do with the San Bernardino incident. The argument of individual requests is playing out in court as we speak but this UK bill they are trying to pass is completely, let me say that again, completely different in nature. They are basically not asking for a back door to your encrypted messages, they are asking you to leave the front door wipe open. I'm with you that BlackBerry is doing the right thing with individual requests from the government but BlackBerry has never nor will ever agree to give the government encryption keys or just flat out stop doing encryption all together. That's why they have threatened to leave countries all together.

    Posted via CB10
    3MIKE and zlatno like this.
    03-02-16 09:27 AM
  22. morganplus8's Avatar
    I'm not denying any of what you said but you confusing the issue. We all know BlackBerry security is second to none and apple security can be a joke at some points. This argument has nothing to do with the San Bernardino incident. The argument of individual requests is playing out in court as we speak but this UK bill they are trying to pass is completely, let me say that again, completely different in nature. They are basically not asking for a back door to your encrypted messages, they are asking you to leave the front door wipe open. I'm with you that BlackBerry is doing the right thing with individual requests from the government but BlackBerry has never nor will ever agree to give the government encryption keys or just flat out stop doing encryption all together. That's why they have threatened to leave countries all together.

    Posted via CB10
    I was merely looking at your comments to BanffMouse and nowhere in his message is there a reference to the UK. I 'm also aware of your separate take on the UK and get how it is impossible to regulate consumer level messaging. BanffMouse was pointing out that, to date, this has been an exclusive issue for BlackBerry and now Apple has hit the news with their version of the problem. I agree with him that it was a negative for BlackBerry in the eyes of the media but "taking a stand" for Apple. I find it amusing that BlackBerry has a matter of fact solution for this issue and Apple is like a grade 9 student still sorting out the details. Apple has recently had to deal with "Error Code 53", they create a mess for consumers and then give back a slight amount on the glaring issue and that's okay. In the end, it isn't possible to police the world, too many people times too many messages to ever conflict with my life. But I do care about needless terror and death and Tim Cook thinks business comes before life saving exceptions. I'm sure we agree on so many things here but to BanffMouse's point, it appears as though BlackBerry gets a special rap when it comes to the media and Apple gets a pass. Of course this is my own, personal opinion, and has nothing to do with whether you buy BBRY today or not. But, this is one of many reasons why I can't own AAPL stock.
    rarsen, Corbu, bbjdog and 4 others like this.
    03-02-16 09:45 AM
  23. jake simmons3's Avatar
    I was merely looking at your comments to BanffMouse and nowhere in his message is there a reference to the UK. I 'm also aware of your separate take on the UK and get how it is impossible to regulate consumer level messaging. BanffMouse was pointing out that, to date, this has been an exclusive issue for BlackBerry and now Apple has hit the news with their version of the problem. I agree with him that it was a negative for BlackBerry in the eyes of the media but "taking a stand" for Apple. I find it amusing that BlackBerry has a matter of fact solution for this issue and Apple is like a grade 9 student still sorting out the details. Apple has recently had to deal with "Error Code 53", they create a mess for consumers and then give back a slight amount on the glaring issue and that's okay. In the end, it isn't possible to police the world, too many people times too many messages to ever conflict with my life. But I do care about needless terror and death and Tim Cook thinks business comes before life saving exceptions. I'm sure we agree on so many things here but to BanffMouse's point, it appears as though BlackBerry gets a special rap when it comes to the media and Apple gets a pass. Of course this is my own, personal opinion, and has nothing to do with whether you buy BBRY today or not. But, this is one of many reasons why I can't own AAPL stock.
    My orginal post was a reply to a UK article so I was a little confused when he tried to argue my point against something completely different. I was merely pointing out 'good luck UK' not going to happen. I agree BlackBerry has got and gets a bad rap on this topic and apple seems to be getting a pass. I agree with you 100 percent on individual requests but my first post was how the UK is wanting the front door open all the time.

    Posted via CB10
    03-02-16 10:22 AM
  24. Corbu's Avatar
    03-02-16 10:24 AM
  25. TGIS's Avatar
    Is this still a thread about BBRY? Or is it about AAPL now?

     Priv... cue the comeback!
    03-02-16 10:37 AM
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