View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1110. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    694 62.52%
  • No

    416 37.48%
  1. DaSchwantz's Avatar
    @kadakn...exactly...the very first thing I check when taking a new position is debt /cash levels. The reason I'm still short NFLX when I covered everything else is the rate of deterioration of the balance sheet. I think the reason ECA is getting taken out to the woodshed is because they took on debt to make a major oil aquisition in 2014. Oil producing land is selling at 95% discounts, and it's causing impairments on financial books. The wash out is just beginning, but the sooner the over leveraged are resolved, the sooner things go back to normal. I despise bailouts.

    Posted via CB10
    01-24-16 04:50 PM
  2. masterful's Avatar
    Anyone watching Asian markets?

    Posted via CB10 on my BlackBerry Passport
    01-24-16 07:51 PM
  3. Corbu's Avatar
    Anyone watching Asian markets?
    Doing fine for the moment.
    3MIKE, La Emperor and CDM76 like this.
    01-24-16 07:53 PM
  4. masterful's Avatar
    Thanks Corbu. Are you using any application to see may I ask

    Posted via CB10 on my BlackBerry Passport
    01-24-16 08:29 PM
  5. Corbu's Avatar
    Thanks Corbu. Are you using any application to see may I ask
    Others will surely be able to help you with which application to use.

    As for myself, I usually follow them on my PC. There are an assortment of sources, such as:
    Asian Stock Markets - CNNMoney
    Asia-Pacific Stock Indexes - Bloomberg

    Hope this helps.
    01-24-16 09:20 PM
  6. 3MIKE's Avatar
    Thanks Corbu. Are you using any application to see may I ask

    Posted via CB10 on my BlackBerry Passport
    I use ;

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...om.cnbc.client

    And,

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...trader.android

    Both have a 15 minute delay. On Google play.
    01-24-16 10:44 PM
  7. masterful's Avatar
    Thanks guys!

    Posted via CB10 on my BlackBerry Passport
    01-25-16 06:21 AM
  8. W Hoa's Avatar
    While over at BlackBerry | Rapid Mobile reading an article about Priv being made available on 02 in the UK I noticed the sites 'Heat Index'

    Considering the site caters to all mobile device makers and all OS's I found it interesting.

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-trending2.jpg
    01-25-16 07:29 AM
  9. Corbu's Avatar
    01-25-16 07:37 AM
  10. rarsen's Avatar
    General information on things you probably suspected:

    Fifty percent of smartphone users 'hooked' on their device
    morganplus8, 3MIKE, W Hoa and 4 others like this.
    01-25-16 08:05 AM
  11. 3MIKE's Avatar
    What an end to the week. We saw some seriously low prices and panic market wide but gave up some nice trading opportunities. BBRY included. Personally, I'm still not convinced it's over so I have sold all my positions, except BBRY, that I started this week. Can't say no to that kind of profit and I just don't see how oil can be up 9% today, after all the news we got this week about higher than expected reserves by more than 2x, Iran ramping up, the Saudi's saying they're gonna keep on going to get market share.... etc.

    None the less, here's the three minute chart for the last 3 days. I see an ascending triangle with $7.05 the line we need to take and hold in order to push on forward. Of course, this goes for many out there as we still seem to be trading of the broad market, but BBRY seems to be a tad more "steady" with a slightly better overall performance. I've overlayed AAPL and the IBB to compare performance after our double bottom on Wednesday morning.

    Happy Friday and Cheers!!

    Attachment 388707
    Again you read the chart perfectly, seems like today it's going to break upwards. (looking at premarket)📈
    Superfly_FR and bungaboy like this.
    01-25-16 08:07 AM
  12. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    While over at BlackBerry | Rapid Mobile reading an article about Priv being made available on 02 in the UK I noticed the sites 'Heat Index'

    Considering the site caters to all mobile device makers and all OS's I found it interesting.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	trending2.JPG 
Views:	2640 
Size:	31.9 KB 
ID:	388996
    TBH (&AFAIK), that's the trending topics in the BlackBerry Section.
    But oh, wait ... that's the trending in general landpage

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-capture.png
    01-25-16 08:25 AM
  13. zlatno's Avatar
    While over at BlackBerry | Rapid Mobile reading an article about Priv being made available on 02 in the UK I noticed the sites 'Heat Index'

    Considering the site caters to all mobile device makers and all OS's I found it interesting.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	trending2.JPG 
Views:	2640 
Size:	31.9 KB 
ID:	388996
    What's the difference between the top two Blackberry's?
    01-25-16 08:39 AM
  14. W Hoa's Avatar
    What's the difference between the top two Blackberry's?
    Different articles
    01-25-16 09:16 AM
  15. 3MIKE's Avatar
    Again you read the chart perfectly, seems like today it's going to break upwards. (looking at premarket)
    Sorry guys, I think I jinxed it. I'll shut up next time!
    01-25-16 11:25 AM
  16. cjcampbell's Avatar
    Sorry guys, I think I jinxed it. I'll shut up next time!
    Well the TA acted accordingly. It tested the upper line again, got pushed back, and when it breached the trendline, it broke down.

    Posted via CB10
    01-25-16 11:48 AM
  17. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Let me try ...
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-capture.png


    P.S : we lost a quarter on 1Y Est ...
    3MIKE, bbjdog and bungaboy like this.
    01-25-16 12:50 PM
  18. Corbu's Avatar
    01-25-16 12:54 PM
  19. Corbu's Avatar
    OT: Fed
    Why the Fed Is the Root of Much Market Turmoil - WSJ

    Fed is a key reason markets have plunged and risk of recession rising

    Not long ago, this week’s Federal Reserve meeting looked like a nonevent. Having begun to raise rates from near zero in December, the central bank was in January expected to stand pat while signaling more increases later on.

    Now, after several bone-jarring weeks to start 2016, many investors hope the Fed is having second thoughts about raising rates three or four more times this year.

    The newfound attention on the January meeting illustrates something few people, even at the central bank, truly appreciate: The Fed is a key reason markets have plunged and the risk of recession, though low, is rising.

    How could a quarter-point rise in rates—the total the Fed has so far delivered—send markets into a tailspin, much less pull the U.S. into recession? Most of the anxiety is about China, emerging markets and oil, all which have little to do with the Fed.

    Yet Fed policy never works solely or even mostly through short-term interest rates. Instead, it operates through a constellation of financial conditions: stock prices, corporate bond yields, exchange rates and most critically, yet least quantifiable, the appetite for risk.

    Unlike short-term rates, the Fed doesn’t dictate the behavior of these broader conditions. It is less orchestra conductor than leader of a mob it inspires but doesn’t control.

    U.S. business cycles have always blended legitimate investment and financial excess: bank loans to less-developed countries in the 1970s and commercial real estate in the 1980s, stocks and bonds issued by technology, media and telecommunications companies in the 1990s and subprime mortgage-backed securities in the 2000s. Just as the Fed doesn’t determine the breadth of the boom, it can’t dictate the scale of the bust.

    The latest cycle follows the pattern, with an important difference. When short-term rates fell to near zero the Fed was forced to rely on other forms of stimulus: purchases of bonds and promises not to raise rates, which worked heavily by raising confidence and risk appetites throughout financial markets. But by relying so much more than usual on broader financial conditions to affect growth it has even less say in the outcome. It is reminiscent of the 19th century when central banks were less important or nonexistent.

    “If you are a central bank reliant on increasing risk as your method for stoking spending you’re going to run into a major problem,” says Peter Berezin of BCA Research. “You can only increase risk so much. And when investors pull back, they do so in a very sharp way.”

    The commodity boom had real drivers, namely the U.S. shale-oil revolution and China. But central banks greased the skids. Investors, seeking something better than the paltry returns on bank deposits and Treasury bonds, threw money at emerging-market countries and energy companies.

    The oil and commodity selloff is similarly rooted in real factors, notably Saudi Arabia’s decision to stop defending the price of oil in 2014. But that has been amplified by the reversal of the flow of easy money, catalyzed by the Fed’s determination, starting in early 2015, to start normalizing rates.

    Short-term rates and short-term bond yields don’t capture how much the Fed has actually tightened. Since the end of 2014 the trade-weighted dollar has risen more than 20%, spreads between yields on junk-rated bonds and Treasurys have widened three percentage points, and the S&P 500 index has dropped 7%. Even the confusion and capital flight triggered by China’s devaluation carry the Fed’s fingerprints. The yuan was dragged higher as the greenback, to which it was closely pegged, rose on expectations of Fed policy normalization. This imparted deflationary pressure that Chinese authorities found intolerable.

    While a quarter-point rise in interest rates wouldn’t tip the U.S. into recession, an across-the-board tightening of financial conditions is a closer call. J.P. Morgan Chase economist Jesse Edgerton reckons recent real economic indicators such as business sentiment and building permits imply a 21% probability of recession in the next 12 months, marginally above the 18% average of any given year. But financial indicators such as stocks and corporate bonds put the probability at between 30% and 40%.

    Some argue the financial excesses of recent years had no real economic benefit so their end won’t carry any real economic cost. That seems too sanguine.

    A study by Jeremy Stein of Harvard University and David Lpez-Salido and Egon Zakrajšek of the Fed finds that when corporate bond sentiment—as reflected in spreads between yields on corporate and Treasury bonds—is unusually optimistic, growth is measurably weaker and unemployment higher two to three years later, because such optimism usually reverses. Importantly, their methodology shows that bond investors aren’t forecasting a downturn in activity, they are causing it.

    None of this means the Fed was wrong to pursue such aggressive monetary policy. Getting unemployment down to 5% is a reward almost certainly well worth the associated financial risks. Yet it underscores the dilemma that will dog the Fed for the foreseeable future. When the “neutral” interest rate, which keeps the economy at full employment, is so low, the Fed will find that boosting growth invariably fuels financial excess.

    “It’s no longer neutral because it’s not consistent with long-term stability,” says Mr. Berezin of BCA Research. “You end up with this possibility that there is no neutral rate at all. So what then is a central bank to do? There’s nothing it can do.”
    01-25-16 12:59 PM
  20. W Hoa's Avatar
    Apple a) has a different way of handling excess inventory or b) can now justify reduced iPhone capacity because:

    BEIJING — A fire broke out on Sunday evening at Foxconn Technology Group’s main iPhone manufacturing complex in the Chinese city of Zhengzhou
    No one was killed/injured
    01-25-16 02:01 PM
  21. cjcampbell's Avatar
    Apple a) has a different way of handling excess inventory or b) can now justify reduced iPhone capacity because:



    No one was killed/injured
    Insurance instead of write down? Hmmmm.... Smoke and mirrors, pun intended. Lol

    Posted via CB10
    morganplus8, W Hoa, 3MIKE and 5 others like this.
    01-25-16 02:34 PM
  22. cjcampbell's Avatar
    So much for optimism in the market after last week ending strong.

    Posted via CB10
    01-25-16 02:43 PM
  23. bbjdog's Avatar
    Entertainment music on this slow day!






    Posted via my BlackBerry Passport
    Corbu, 3MIKE, morganplus8 and 1 others like this.
    01-25-16 04:27 PM
  24. Corbu's Avatar
    What?s (Still) Haunting Markets ? At A Glance - WSJ

    Stock markets around the globe have had a brutal start to 2016. The magnitude of the moves can change day by day, but the major themes weighing on markets prevail.

    Stocks have climbed steadily higher for nearly seven years since the financial crisis. Investors expected that the big gains would spark consumer and business spending and, over time, propel stronger growth world-wide.

    Now that narrative is being called into question. China’s economy, the world’s second largest and a stalwart of growth, is slowing. Oil prices are languishing around 12-year lows. U.S. growth is looking uneven. Before the market can really stabilize, traders say, they need to see signs of relief on these issues:


    China's Growth

    China is losing economic momentum after a decade of stellar economic expansion. Beijing reported a 6.9% growth rate for 2015, the weakest in a quarter century.

    While the slowdown isn’t new, volatility and unpredictability in Chinese markets have continued to unnerve investors. In the first week of 2016, China’s central bank made its largest downward adjustment to the country’s currency, the yuan, since August. The country’s stock market tumbled and others around the world followed. Investors’ confidence in Beijing was damaged when China’s newly installed stock-market circuit breaker, meant to limit volatility, was triggered twice and then suspended altogether.

    The Shanghai Composite Index has fallen into so-called bear-market territory, down more than 20% from a recent high in late December.

    Oil Prices

    U.S. crude oil traded at about $100 a barrel two years ago. As producers around the world pumped at record levels, the price has plunged: Down more than 70% from its June 2014 high to below $30 a barrel. While recent gains have taken it back above that benchmark, the global glut of crude persists. Saudi Arabia and other major producers haven’t shown signs of slowing production and Iran, with sanctions lifted, is set to send even more oil into the market.

    For investors, the question is how long energy producers can survive amid depressed oil prices. The U.S. shale boom of the past decade helped drive economic growth. The steep drop in the price of crude threatens to wipe out that expansion. Shares of energy companies in the S&P 500 have fallen more than 8% in 2016, and are off nearly 50% from their June 2014 high.

    U.S. Economic Recovery

    Many investors remained broadly upbeat over the past year about the long-term outlook for the U.S., despite sluggish growth abroad. Job gains have been strong and gross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services produced across the economy, has expanded, albeit modestly.

    However, manufacturing activity is weak, corporate executives are cautioning that 2016 sales may again be muted and inflation is soft, calling into question the pace of the Fed’s interest-rate increases.

    Central Bank Stimulus

    Since the financial crisis, investors have grown accustomed to central bank support. In December, however, the U.S. Federal Reserve announced it was raising short-term interest rates, ending seven years of keeping them near zero. With economies around the world still sluggish, investors are questioning whether the Fed moved too soon. Other central banks, including in Japan and Europe, are still enacting stimulus measures, but traders worry about whether it will be enough.
    3MIKE, rarsen, bbjdog and 4 others like this.
    01-25-16 05:34 PM
  25. smart548's Avatar
    http://app.biz.blackberry.com/e/es?s...f899225d0f37f7

    Maybe there's someone interested..

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-1453765822579_047256.jpeg

    Posted via CB10
    Corbu, bbjdog, morganplus8 and 4 others like this.
    01-25-16 05:52 PM
106,802 ... 38113812381338143815 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Does the Motion have the paratek antenna?
    By Steve Pogue in forum BlackBerry Motion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-13-18, 12:33 AM
  2. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-23-17, 11:06 PM
  3. Will Hub+ work on the new Google Pixelbook?
    By danosman in forum BlackBerry HUB+ Suite
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-02-17, 07:42 AM
  4. BlackBerry highlights the impact of KRACK vulnerability on BlackBerry products
    By CrackBerry News in forum CrackBerry.com News Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-30-17, 03:10 PM
  5. Hub and Viber notifications broken
    By LyoobaBerry in forum BlackBerry HUB+ Suite
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-30-17, 02:54 PM

Tags for this Thread

LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD