View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1110. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    694 62.52%
  • No

    416 37.48%
  1. app_Developer's Avatar
    CEO Chen has always taken an understated / candid position with his "marketing comments" which contributes to his credibility.... better to exceed expectations and be under the radar until the right time... when is the right time? ...
    So when do we get to the part where Chen actually exceeds expectations?
    CDM76 and b121 like this.
    10-08-15 04:06 PM
  2. RLTurn77's Avatar
    Good point but remember why I said I'd come back in March ? See you all in March when we can compare track records again.
    May I ask why?

    On a side note... so far BlackBerry stock has reacted negatively *almost* every time Chen speaks. What are we down about 7 for 7 every time the man interviews lol.

    I'm really curious as to what tomorrow will now bring with this interview as well as the confidence/commentary from Morgan (you are very respected). I expected some profit taking closer to $7 with a dip below then a move back up.

    Would like to get back in soon. It's nice to *own* part of the company you are passionate about... especially with most of us believing bbry is greatly undervalued.

    As a consumer, I'm not thrilled at all. Personally, I love BB10. I converted my parents and sister to a Z10, Z30, and a Passport. They were all waiting for the Slider and I know that I've already posted this on some of the front page articles, but I think it's relevant here from a consumer perspective.

    My sister is now getting the iPhone 6S because of the name Priv. She loves her Z30 that she is using with a cracked screen (lol) and desperately needs an upgrade. She decided against the Slider because of the name alone. I really thought it was a joke... until it wasn't.

    We can all disagree and call her stupid, but she (along with my parents) represent the general public more than myself or many here. She just won't buy a device called a Priv since she feels like she would not only have to justify getting a BlackBerry, but will have to justify the name Priv as well.

    My parents are in the same boat. Absolutely hate the name to the point that they may pass it up also. It took a lot to get my mom and sister off of iOS and sucks to see her going back because of something so dumb.

    Anyway, my point is that the name is important and I really hope it isn't a huge hindrance. Based on the four of us, I'm the only one still looking at it. Hope this is not reflective of much of the market. Blah... still can't get over such a blunder. Oh well, back to the stock...

    Posted via CB10
    10-08-15 04:37 PM
  3. 3MIKE's Avatar
    So when do we get to the part where Chen actually exceeds expectations?
    I think he already is exceeding expectations coz if it weren't for him we wouldn't be having this chat!
    ibpluto, bungaboy, dusdal and 13 others like this.
    10-08-15 06:17 PM
  4. Corbu's Avatar
    10-08-15 08:22 PM
  5. kadakn01's Avatar
    10-08-15 09:46 PM
  6. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    Who knows where BlackBerry would be without Chen. Certainly Heins wasn't the answer. His for sale blunder superceded every positive he transitioned them through. However, just where would we be if...

    Someone had been given the reins who recognized how desperate the base has been for a top-notch predecessor to the Z30. If they had capitalized on the marketing power being a part of Mercedes F1 should have been. Spent some of that reserve cash on OS development, to at a minimum bring BB10 up to speed with BBOS7.1. Pushed QNX to have BlackBerry compatible with every infotainment system they created, etc. Would it have been enough to overcome the infamous app gap? Who knows. Now, at this juncture, it's hard to believe we'll ever know.

    I appreciate what Chen has done to preserve the brand, but I'm not just an investor, I'm a BlackBerry phone fan, who will move to another platform only as a last resort (yes, I consider a BlackBerry running Android another platform). It's not the name on the outside that keeps me using it, nor a few features. It's the entire experience BB10 provides, that only it can.

    Ya know, I'm probably gonna tick a few of you off (if the above didn't already, LoL), but reading comments of late has provoked me to get this off my chest. I don't think anyone who constantly sells shares as the price goes up, then waits and hopes for a dip to buy them again is truly a supporter. Kudos to whomever has managed to profit over the past few tumultuous years. That's what the market is for. I cannot see how that benefits BlackBerry in any way though, and you that have seem to use it as a badge of supporter honor. Maybe I'm just market ignorant, and someone like Morgan can come along and teach me something.
    10-08-15 10:12 PM
  7. sidhuk's Avatar


    Ya know, I'm probably gonna tick a few of you off (if the above didn't already, LoL), but reading comments of late has provoked me to get this off my chest.
    Yesterday is never gonna come back.
    supporting the brand by buying their hand sets and their services because it is a pioneer technology, pride of my country and very usable hand set and os.
    sell shares and buy shares because it is business at the same times so that i have enough money to be here and support my desired hobbies and having fun is one of them.
    Nice to have the the power to get the things off your chest. only difference is that when others get things off their chest, you know what happens to them. Jury and judge..........
    No one is right or wrong. it is like-wise people at the end. and every one is right imo in their own mind, life goes on. we all feel holding the torch, very important feelings.
    thanks for letting it off your chest. much appreciated. welcome any time when you explain it like that. thanks.
    10-09-15 12:01 AM
  8. sidhuk's Avatar
    PRIV’s security strengths: “We’ve created a patching mechanism that will address attacks a lot quicker than other (vendors) to protect the customer…we inject a PIN in every chip in every phone – we are the only Android maker to do that. We work with Google…we think we’ll be more resilient than anyone else.”
    10-09-15 12:07 AM
  9. Superfly_FR's Avatar

    (1) Who knows where BlackBerry would be without Chen. Certainly Heins wasn't the answer. His for sale blunder superceded every positive he transitioned them through. However, just where would we be if...

    (2) Someone had been given the reins who recognized how desperate the base has been for a top-notch predecessor to the Z30. If they had capitalized on the marketing power being a part of Mercedes F1 should have been. Spent some of that reserve cash on OS development, to at a minimum bring BB10 up to speed with BBOS7.1. Pushed QNX to have BlackBerry compatible with every infotainment system they created, etc. Would it have been enough to overcome the infamous app gap? Who knows. Now, at this juncture, it's hard to believe we'll ever know.

    (3) I appreciate what Chen has done to preserve the brand, but I'm not just an investor, I'm a BlackBerry phone fan, who will move to another platform only as a last resort (yes, I consider a BlackBerry running Android another platform). It's not the name on the outside that keeps me using it, nor a few features. It's the entire experience BB10 provides, that only it can.

    (4) Ya know, I'm probably gonna tick a few of you off (if the above didn't already, LoL), but reading comments of late has provoked me to get this off my chest. I don't think anyone who constantly sells shares as the price goes up, then waits and hopes for a dip to buy them again is truly a supporter. Kudos to whomever has managed to profit over the past few tumultuous years. That's what the market is for. I cannot see how that benefits BlackBerry in any way though, and you that have seem to use it as a badge of supporter honor. Maybe I'm just market ignorant, and someone like Morgan can come along and teach me something.
    (1) Probably sold apart for weak value.

    (2) This is device oriented. I believe they identified sooner-than-we-think BB10 as a transitional solution, only mandatory to maintain their "high grade security" market. Volumes were not sufficient to drive any interest for car makers, even for QNX alone (even in early stages, they were using Sony devices for demo ...). Tough, maybe that's where we may finally find BB10 - as an emanation - again. BB10 gestures/UI are very efficient and close to meet what I'd expect to see on an infotainement system large screen. They "just" have to enable CarPlay and Android auto layers over it. In short : yes they could have done this if they didn't choose to concentrate all forces to the enterprise and software market. But given their choice, what you legitimately note was simply off topic.

    (3) We're two of that kind.

    (4) You know, this whole thread started as a contrarian claim.
    Most here do hold shares in various quantities and we all (most) went in when the situation was far from bright. Kinda "vote of confidence" while the company and the SP were in the storm. I believe "puting words and acts together" sums this up pretty well.
    But we're talking about real money and I wouldn't blame anyone who wants his investment to thrive. That's just pure logic, fore those who have the balls and knowledge to trade this particular hyper volatile stock (I don't, my position hasn't changed since I reached 1K from zero, buying only that is). Besides this, most historicals are here for years, and their "devotion to the cause" (I weight my words) is not questionable. Either if we refer to their own devices history, the number of devices they've contributed to sell, the counter-analysis they've made when W.S analysts were crushing anything BlackBerry in such a proportion that one could legitimately claim they formed a league and the time they've spent to educate many readers here. Not to mention outside of this thread, the thousands of hours combined they've spend - for free - spreading the good word.

    This place is a Bull place, most of the time driven by a simple vision : BlackBerry (BBRY) have a great potential for the near future and could be later a huge success. Even when (un)expected situations or unsatisfying results were measurable. We considered them as accidents like many of us entrepreneurs have met in their professional history. I'm not sure what our average age is; I'm 50 in a couple of weeks and I'd tend to believe many have already crossed this line: we have some IRL experience.

    As of "yesterday", the plans - even non successful - were set in a direction we all (here) agreed with.
    Some of the recent changes (going Android, targeting mass market again) were arguments "bears" were rising against us when we were defending the board & CEOs positions; and now that they *seem* to be part of the new path, the same bears can't stop and continue to criticize where they should rally and shout "we were right, hat off mister Chen".

    That's the point this never-ending logorrhea is about : we're not here in the mindset to bend the SP with our words; we're here because we believe it will go north, sooner or later. And our entitlement is the material proof of our support. Just that.

    Thanks for reading, you're brave !
    Mhoooooo,
    Peace,
    SF

    P.S : I also believe we do support Crackberry.com in a significant proportion, or maybe we're less tightwad of our thanks than others around the forums (but there's also the views count) ...
    All these top thanked (today) are regulars here. Hat off, sirs !
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-capture.png
    Last edited by Superfly_FR; 10-09-15 at 03:38 AM.
    10-09-15 03:25 AM
  10. _dimi_'s Avatar
    What I like about JC, is that he's not afraid to speak his mind. The markets see through euphemisms anyway, so you might as well be open to your investors and limit the possibility for unpleasant surprises. It shows he's aware of the state BlackBerry is in, and gives credibility to his plans for the company (e.g. in IoT, or the future value at 15 dollars / share being too low). I feel he often gives 'hints' at BlackBerry's future too, through things he expresses... or choses not to mention.

    CNET 20 Years - Page 14 - CNET

    Written by John Chen

    Building a securely connected world
    Embracing open, cross-platform tech is how we're preparing for a world where everything is a little smarter.

    What a difference two decades in Silicon Valley makes. Look at the hardware side: We've evolved from gray-box desktop PCs and lightweight laptops to today's far-more-powerful, sleeker smartphones and tablets. On the software and connectivity side, we've transcended yesterday's restricted client-server networks toward today's open, agile Internet dominated by public and private cloud software and services.

    I've seen plenty of change in Silicon Valley over my 35-year career here, the world's center stage for innovation. I've also observed that some things stay the same. For one, the vast majority of startups continue to fail -- 92% of startups, according to research. For every Facebook, there are 10 Friendsters. A unicorn today can lose its horn tomorrow -- especially ones that repeatedly fall down on user privacy and business security.

    Meanwhile, organizations successful in one era can reinvent themselves for the next one. "I've seen this movie before" is what I first said when I joined BlackBerry 20 months ago. Look at IBM, HP and Intel. The key to thriving in multiple eras is creating an organizational culture that is always looking to the future and willing to make the hard decisions to adapt to it -- and never ignoring fundamentals such as poor security that will make your customers run away.

    This is the biggest truth I've learned: Open systems always win in the long run. I learned this lesson at my first job as a chip designer, working on the Motorola 88000 processor. With its elegant, 32-bit RISC architecture, the 88000 was faster and technically-superior in every way to Intel's 8/16-bit 8086 processor. But IBM chose the cheaper 8086 for its PC; that decision spawned the x86 ecosystem that still exists today.

    (On a personal level, I used to own a Sony Betamax VCR. My engineer's mindset at the time led me to choose the "better" product, not understanding that VHS's open ecosystem would win out.)

    No longer. As soon as I joined BlackBerry, I said that vertical and closed was dead and declared that our present and future is bringing our distinctive strengths in security, privacy and productivity to the open, cross-platform world.

    In the longer-term, enterprise mobility will be dwarfed by a far bigger industry -- the Internet of Things. Smartphones and tablets will be a mere fraction of the smart, connected devices in the IoT universe. Rolling out IoT devices is only one side of the coin -- we need software to manage and harvest and analyze data from them.

    Does that give a leg up to IoT startups and other speedy, vertically-integrated innovators? No, and here's why: IoT includes both new sectors as well as established markets. For every connected home thermostat or smart power meter, there are 10 mobile devices, PCs, car-based infotainment devices, etc. IoT is engulfing all of these existing industries. That's why it's simultaneously youthful and mature.

    Thriving in Silicon Valley may be a hyper-Darwinistic game, but nowhere do the rules dictate that tomorrow's winners must be highly funded startups. Rather, successful companies had the DNA to be winners once. Who says they cannot rise again? Because reinvention is as quintessentially American of a story as pulling yourself up by your bootstraps (make that Canadian, too -- there's no monopoly on innovation in this global village). That's a movie I'd pay money to see -- and it's one script I'm currently writing.
    10-09-15 05:15 AM
  11. bungaboy's Avatar
    Who knows where BlackBerry would be without Chen. Certainly Heins wasn't the answer. His for sale blunder superceded every positive he transitioned them through. . .
    This wasn't Heins decision This was a Board decision.
    10-09-15 06:16 AM
  12. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    This wasn't Heins decision This was a Board decision.
    Where it initially emanated from we may never know, but one thing is for sure. He was the one seen hammering the sign into the ground.
    10-09-15 06:40 AM
  13. rarsen's Avatar
    General information on The Use of Offshore Tax Havens by Fortune 500 Companies

    Offshore Shell Games 2015 | CTJReports

    "Most of America’s largest corporations maintain subsidiaries in offshore tax havens. At least 358 companies, nearly 72 percent of the Fortune 500, operate subsidiaries in tax haven jurisdictions as of the end of 2014.
    -Apple: Apple has booked $181.1 billion offshore — more than any other company. It would owe $59.2 billion in U.S. taxes if these profits were not officially held offshore for tax purposes. A 2013 Senate investigation found that Apple has structured two Irish subsidiaries to be tax residents of neither the United States, where they are managed and controlled, nor Ireland, where they are incorporated. This arrangement ensures that they pay no tax to any government on the lion’s share of their offshore profits
    -Morgan Stanley reports having 210 subsidiaries in offshore tax havens. The bank officially holds $7.4 billion offshore. It has also been infamously implicated in facilitating individual tax evasion through its Swiss banking division.
    -Google reported operating 25 subsidiaries in tax havens in 2009, but since 2010 only discloses two, both in Ireland. During that period, it increased the amount of cash it reported offshore from $7.7 billion to $47.4 billion. An academic analysis found that as of 2012, the 23 no-longer-disclosed tax haven subsidiaries were still operating.
    -Microsoft, which reported operating 10 subsidiaries in tax havens in 2007, disclosed only five in 2014. During this same time period, the amount of money that Microsoft reported holding offshore jumped by a factor of 14. Microsoft has paid a tax rate of only 3 percent to foreign governments on those profits, suggesting that most of the cash is booked in tax havens.
    Congress can and should take strong action to prevent corporations from using offshore tax havens, which in turn would restore basic fairness to the tax system, reduce the deficit and improve the functioning of markets."
    10-09-15 06:43 AM
  14. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Where it initially emanated from we may never know, but one thing is for sure. He was the one seen hammering the sign into the ground.
    Lol.. but we do know.. it has to be a Board decision. And if you want to speculate, you'd be better off voting for Prem as he resigned from the Board as his bid for taking the company private was a conflict of interest. And if I remember correctly, Heins was literally nowhere to be found for many weeks...
    bungaboy, morganplus8 and Mr BBRY like this.
    10-09-15 06:48 AM
  15. bungaboy's Avatar
    Where it initially emanated from we may never know, but one thing is for sure. He was the one seen hammering the sign into the ground.
    It came from a "Special Committee" of the Board.
    bbjdog, Corbu, Mr BBRY and 1 others like this.
    10-09-15 06:49 AM
  16. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    General information on The Use of Offshore Tax Havens by Fortune 500 Companies

    Offshore Shell Games 2015 | CTJReports

    "Most of Americas largest corporations maintain subsidiaries in offshore tax havens. At least 358 companies, nearly 72 percent of the Fortune 500, operate subsidiaries in tax haven jurisdictions as of the end of 2014.
    -Apple: Apple has booked $181.1 billion offshore more than any other company. It would owe $59.2 billion in U.S. taxes if these profits were not officially held offshore for tax purposes. A 2013 Senate investigation found that Apple has structured two Irish subsidiaries to be tax residents of neither the United States, where they are managed and controlled, nor Ireland, where they are incorporated. This arrangement ensures that they pay no tax to any government on the lions share of their offshore profits
    -Morgan Stanley reports having 210 subsidiaries in offshore tax havens. The bank officially holds $7.4 billion offshore. It has also been infamously implicated in facilitating individual tax evasion through its Swiss banking division.
    -Google reported operating 25 subsidiaries in tax havens in 2009, but since 2010 only discloses two, both in Ireland. During that period, it increased the amount of cash it reported offshore from $7.7 billion to $47.4 billion. An academic analysis found that as of 2012, the 23 no-longer-disclosed tax haven subsidiaries were still operating.
    -Microsoft, which reported operating 10 subsidiaries in tax havens in 2007, disclosed only five in 2014. During this same time period, the amount of money that Microsoft reported holding offshore jumped by a factor of 14. Microsoft has paid a tax rate of only 3 percent to foreign governments on those profits, suggesting that most of the cash is booked in tax havens.
    Congress can and should take strong action to prevent corporations from using offshore tax havens, which in turn would restore basic fairness to the tax system, reduce the deficit and improve the functioning of markets."
    Wish I had time to pontificate, but I'm pushing the "get to work" departure time as it is, LoL.

    The US has the highest corporate taxes in the industrialized world. Those companies don't compete in a vacuum, and the reality is they don't pay taxes anyway. Their consumers do. When they have a higher cost of operation, who can blame them for doing whatever is necessary to avoid it and succeed.
    10-09-15 06:53 AM
  17. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    Wish I had time to pontificate, but I'm pushing the "get to work" departure time as it is, LoL.

    The US has the highest corporate taxes in the industrialized world. Those companies don't compete in a vacuum, and the reality is they don't pay taxes anyway. Their consumers do. When they have a higher cost of operation, who can blame them for doing whatever is necessary to avoid it and succeed.
    So, you are advocating that high taxes justifies doing whatever it takes to avoid paying any? As a citizen of society, we entered into an agreement in which we pay taxes to maintain certain infrastructures to ensure safety, order, logistics, judicial systems, education, etc., which are absolutely necessary for the functioning of any business. And you think that it's okay to take those benefits, but refusing to pay for them?

    Posted via CB10
    bungaboy, bbjdog, jxnb and 8 others like this.
    10-09-15 07:32 AM
  18. Uzi's Avatar
    BlackBerry priv getting Bluetooth certification

    https://www.bluetooth.org/tpg/QLI_viewQDL.cfm?qid=25882


    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-img_20151009_212009.png
    10-09-15 08:23 AM
  19. farmwersteve's Avatar


    I don't think anyone who constantly sells shares as the price goes up, then waits and hopes for a dip to buy them again is truly a supporter. Kudos to whomever has managed to profit over the past few tumultuous years. That's what the market is for. I cannot see how that benefits BlackBerry in any way though, and you that have seem to use it as a badge of supporter honor. Maybe I'm just market ignorant, and someone like Morgan can come along and teach me something.
    I wonder if babe Ruth fans, gretzky fans, blue Jays fans ever took profits because they had autographed balls, signed rookie cards or season tickets that just became valuable due to making the playoffs

    I see your point, but I think one can be a fan and supporter and still try and turn a buck.

    The difference with day traders and supporters who buy and sell is that day traders may bash the company to hope it drops and then pump the company to hope it rises.

    Supporters seem to have an attitude that they hope the company succeeds and that they hope we are all at the $100 party

    I'm a supporter of the devices and company and am saddened by the potential loss of bb10

    Also, I wish I had the courage to make a few well timed day trades to make some money on this company while it ebbs and flows through its transition.

    Supporters don't profit off the company, they are profiting off wall st.


    Posted via CB10
    10-09-15 08:36 AM
  20. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    So, you are advocating that high taxes justifies doing whatever it takes to avoid paying any? As a citizen of society, we entered into an agreement in which we pay taxes to maintain certain infrastructures to ensure safety, order, logistics, judicial systems, education, etc., which are absolutely necessary for the functioning of any business. And you think that it's okay to take those benefits, but refusing to pay for them?

    Posted via CB10
    Are they refusing to pay those taxes... or are they like everyone else. Using the legal loop hole in the system in place to keep as much of their money as they can. If you want you can change the laws to remove those loop holes.

    But then you risk pushing many of those corporation out of the US market. Sure they would still have a presences here, but they would only pay taxes on the products sold here. Apple, Google and Microsoft don't need their HQ and most of their staff (tax payers also) located in the US... designers, engineers and coder can be found in a lot of places, and many people would be willing to relocate. If they US tax system became "unfriendly" they and a LOT of other corporations would simply pick up and move to a more tax friendly country like say Japan.

    It's a balancing act... that a non manufacturing country like the US has to be very careful not to upset.
    gg22 and BigBadWulf like this.
    10-09-15 08:37 AM
  21. sidhuk's Avatar
    From CB's front page.
    "At a conference I was at today, one of BlackBerry's executives had a 'Priv' which he let me play with for a bit. I must admit, it's a VERY nice device. It was actually thinner than my Note 5! It also seemed snappy and smooth, and the keyboard was also very nice. It had full access to the Play store as you would expect, and he had a few apps loaded. The screen was very nice with a high PPI, and it seemed to curvey around the edges. I have to say that I'm definitely interested in Blackberry again! [sic]"

    Thinner than note 5 and still have slider keyboard? Will have to see. I think JC has a great hand set on hands and ready to be released in the market.
    IMO. JC down playing priv purposely, another words not hyping it as much as we hope for.
    JC is no newbie to tech world or news media. Will see in a months time or so.

    Posted via CB10
    morganplus8, Corbu, 3MIKE and 5 others like this.
    10-09-15 08:50 AM
  22. snaponsly's Avatar
    What's the difference between the 3 devices in that list?
    10-09-15 08:53 AM
  23. BThunderW's Avatar
    OpEx day. Place your bets 7 or 7.5?
    10-09-15 08:53 AM
  24. Uzi's Avatar
    What's the difference between the 3 devices in that list?
    I think for region specific like STV100-3 for APAC
    bungaboy likes this.
    10-09-15 08:54 AM
  25. andyk350's Avatar
    From CB's front page.
    "At a conference I was at today, one of BlackBerry's executives had a 'Priv' which he let me play with for a bit. I must admit, it's a VERY nice device. It was actually thinner than my Note 5! It also seemed snappy and smooth, and the keyboard was also very nice. It had full access to the Play store as you would expect, and he had a few apps loaded. The screen was very nice with a high PPI, and it seemed to curvey around the edges. I have to say that I'm definitely interested in Blackberry again! [sic]"

    Thinner than note 5 and still have slider keyboard? Will have to see. I think JC has a great hand set on hands and ready to be released in the market.
    IMO. JC down playing priv purposely, another words not hyping it as much as we hope for.
    JC is no newbie to tech world or news media. Will see in a months time or so.

    Posted via CB10
    https://www.reddit.com/r/Android/com...h_the_priv_my/

    The guy who handled the Priv is still commenting on it this morning. Of particular note:

    "From a security standpoint, he explained that inside BB they have ratings for their devices when it comes to MDM and security. The BB10 OS devices are considered to be for Heavily Regulated and Government customers. The Priv is designed for Enterprise and iOS/KNOX and others would be just below the Priv as far as device hardening capabilities are concerned with their BES 12 MDM solution."

    "He mentioned that the engineering teams at Blackberry and RIM were sitting beside each other in creating the device so Google has definitely known and has had hand in helping BB create this device."

    "He said it would be on all carriers here in Canada by the end of October."

    Here's a link to see only comments made by the guy who posted the pictures:

    https://www.reddit.com/user/imsorandom
    bungaboy, Corbu, W Hoa and 8 others like this.
    10-09-15 08:56 AM
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