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  1. dusdal's Avatar
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-img_20150529_105011.png

    Anyone keen to check which of these organizations have a TP below where we are now?

    Posted via CB10
    05-29-15 12:51 PM
  2. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    Hey ya'll. I'm alive, just so you know! Hope everyone is well and so on!
    Don't be a stranger Kid. M8 hasn't been the same since you stopped posting pics of frisky Asian chick's at your functions.


    Back on topic.

    Classic and Z30 looks to be doing well at Verizon, taking #1 and #2 ranking:


    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-img_20150529_110546.png



    And this, to bounce off the last Waterloo Chamber of Commerce meet:

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/...rity/28091949/
    Last edited by Bacon Munchers; 05-29-15 at 01:19 PM.
    05-29-15 01:09 PM
  3. zyben's Avatar
    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security

    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security
    05-29-15 01:30 PM
  4. sidhuk's Avatar
    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security

    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security
    Good timing for this article. Thanks Zyben
    05-29-15 02:06 PM
  5. zyben's Avatar
    Good timing for this article. Thanks Zyben
    My pleasure Sidhuk
    bbjdog, Corbu and bungaboy like this.
    05-29-15 02:25 PM
  6. zyben's Avatar
    Souljaboy with his Passport:

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-11355215_104393893231262_1000830767_n.jpg

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-11259706_934728759911733_2137458715_n.jpg

    Proving that using the Passport boosts his productivity:

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-11313343_884172258321156_1355479252_n.jpg
    05-29-15 02:52 PM
  7. W Hoa's Avatar
    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security

    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security
    Chen: We have a couple of very exciting devices that are going to come out towards the end of this calendar year. So things are clicking there.
    05-29-15 03:20 PM
  8. Christophe Piquemal's Avatar
    05-29-15 03:34 PM
  9. donmateo's Avatar
    Chen: We have a couple of very exciting devices that are going to come out towards the end of this calendar year. So things are clicking there.
    Intriguing...

    Posted via CB10
    05-29-15 04:33 PM
  10. spiller's Avatar
    Slider in December is forever away....

    Posted via CB10
    CDM76, bungaboy, 3MIKE and 2 others like this.
    05-29-15 04:45 PM
  11. Corbu's Avatar
    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security

    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security
    This is a good one, zyben. Thanks for that!

    I hope you don't mind if I post it in extenso. Just for the record, as they say...

    Mobility is the biggest innovation my generation has seen in years. That's why the competition for your smartphone dollars is raging. But the more than 7 billion mobile phones on the planet combined with a data explosion — from your financial information to your healthcare — means securing that data is as big a business opportunity as your cellphone. BlackBerry may be known as a smartphone maker, but the real opportunity for the company is capitalizing on that need for security and privacy — and many government leaders and CEOs tell me that BlackBerry has better technology in securing that data than others. John Chen was brought in 18 months ago as a turnaround specialist and quickly realized his edge: It wasn't just about the device, but more so about protecting what's inside that device. I caught up with Chen to find out how his strategy is working. Our interview follows, edited for clarity and length.

    Q: You've been running Blackberry now for 18 months. How are things progressing?

    A: I've been doing a bunch of things, investing in the future. And my No. 1 priority is to make money and generate cash, and then invest that cash. Over the last 18 months there's a lot of proof of that. The last two quarters in a row, we made money and generated cash. The trend is in the right direction. We acquired three companies, all aligned with the strategy of us being the leader in security and privacy, and focusing on enterprise computing and the power users — the people in the professional world and governments.

    We also made a minority investment in a small company that provides software for medical usage — clinical trial usages. So we're pretty much aligned to what I set out to do. The journey is about halfway through. We're going to stay focused on executing; the strategy has not changed. The vision that I set out to do is to get ourselves very focused on enterprise, on professional users, and on security and privacy protections. The medical verticals, governments, financial, regulated industries such as gas and energy, the legal industry.

    Q: You're not just competing with the Apples of the world, but also security companies.

    A: This is the basic building block on everything we do. And this is the major differentiation of the company. It's starting in the software and the server that manages all these devices — not only our device, but also iPhone and Android and Windows. We also made our device more secure than everybody else's. A lot of people ask me why I'm in the device business. First, it's a good business to be in if you can make money. Second, it's our first entry point of security. If we can secure the device, it makes securing the software and the data management and the collaboration and file sharing and content and pictures and videos and everything that much more easier. So this is why all the governments in the major developed countries are using our devices. You can see the heads of state using our devices.

    Q: If you look at the business over the next 10 years, how much will be security and privacy, and how much making smartphones?

    A: I don't think you can separate the two, and 10 years seems to be an awful long time. I would say the difference between the hardware and software business is probably more like 80/20 right now. In the next year or two I'd like to get to 50/50 or 60/40 so that we build a pretty robust software business. And the other software business is based on security almost entirely. The differentiation is it will come from security, and the area we talk about (with that) is the medical field. The hardware also will contribute to the security part of the equation. But the handset business is going to be very much focused on professionals using the device.

    Q: Where is the big opportunity in terms of the smartphone market?

    A: The smartphone business is going to be bigger overseas than in the North America market.

    Q: And is that people getting their first phones or upgrading to a smartphone?

    A: People graduate from college and step into their professional careers. We have a new product that focuses a lot on that. So it depends on what country and what market we're talking about. We're strong in Indonesia and Africa, and some of the Latin America countries. And a lot of those young people are entering into the workforce. This is our basic audience. In the developed world, we're focusing on people like heads of governments, lawyers, doctors, engineers and people in the business world, where security is important to you, file collaboration is important to you, where your privacy is important.

    Q: What will be the most important metrics for you to say that "yes, we moved the needle"?

    A: There are two things happening to our company. We've gotten it into a very stable environment financially. We have more than $3 billion of cash. We're investing, we have a strategy, we're a good set of people.

    Q: What will it take for you to sustain earnings growth?

    A: First, cut costs in the hardware business. I believe we can do that with some level of collaboration or partnership. Not doing everything myself is important. So we'll be able to focus on really great design and security and privacy. We won't try to do everything and we will focus on priorities. We have a good set of plans and designs to do it. We have a couple of very exciting devices that are going to come out towards the end of this calendar year. So things are clicking there.

    The one big area we were sliding was in the service area. In the old BlackBerry devices, every user gives us through their phone bill a few dollars every month — something of a service-activation fee. My biggest challenge is that number's now going down. Whether somebody took the old phone and replaced it with a new BlackBerry phone, or somebody takes an old BlackBerry phone and moves to one of my competitor's phone, that number is continuing to decline. Unfortunately, it's the highest margin business of ours.

    So while I'm shifting that business, the question becomes, "How do I cover that?" The way to cover it is to really focus on growing our software business and our messaging business, because they carry the same margin profile. And of course, the software business is also the easiest for us to amplify our advantage in security and privacy. . It's very important to our business case. Those two in combination will allow us to not only get the margins and therefore earnings to improve, but also we'll get closer to the overall strategy to generate more cash, and invest our cash in a thoughtful way.
    I believe BlackBerry still lacks on the "Communications" front and one of the best tools it has at its disposal is JC himself. He is personable and he has something to say. If I were in charge of Communications, I would make sure he gets regular, say monthly, interviews with major outlets. At the Kitchener Chamber of Commerce luncheon, he mentioned the difficulty he has in changing the company's reputation and the image it projects. No question there. But a systematic, thoughtfully planned Communications effort would dearly help insofar as the "public" part of the endeavour is concerned since he is certainly meeting privately with tons of people. Both work hand in hand.

    And a nice weekend to everyone. And thanks for the kudos. But we are all contributing here. That's what is great with this thread.
    rarsen, Mr BBRY, CDM76 and 9 others like this.
    05-29-15 04:48 PM
  12. Corbu's Avatar
    Chen: We have a couple of very exciting devices that are going to come out towards the end of this calendar year. So things are clicking there.
    At the Kitchener luncheon, JC mentions (26:14) that four devices are planned for this FY. One is the Leap, one is the Slider. He talks about those two... As for the remaining two... I guess we'll have to wait.
    05-29-15 04:57 PM
  13. Corbu's Avatar
    My First Car: A high-tech guy meets his match | Toronto Star

    My First Car: A high-tech guy meets his match
    BlackBerry’s CEO thought a Ford Fiesta would be just the low-maintenance ticket. He was wrong

    By: Yvonne Marton special to the star, Published on Fri May 29 2015

    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has a rep in the corporate world as a turnaround artist, steering troubled tech firms to stability and profitability.

    But long before that climb through the executive ranks, he was a young Hong Kong student wondering about getting the jump on an Ivy League education after checking out brochures on a chance suggestion from a school counsellor.

    Falling in love with the images of New England in the fall, Chen says he went back to his advisor.

    “I remember he said, ‘Well, you know, you’re a really good student . . . but you’re not that good.’ ”

    Laughing, Chen says he was okay with that advisor’s frankness. Chen’s fallback option of attending a top Hong Kong university (though they didn’t necessarily focus on the applied sciences like his chosen field of engineering) was a solid and less-expensive path.

    That was important. Chen is not from a wealthy family. But he was nothing if not practical, methodical and undeterred. His parents had left China for Hong Kong and had risen to the ranks of the middle class through hard work. Like many immigrants, they prized education for their three children, Chen being the eldest. Tuition for an overseas education was a stretch, so only a premier school was worth the investment.

    Again on advice from his counsellor, Chen researched the top five Ivy League feeder schools, places where he could do his final year of high school and from which he would then likely gain entrance to an Ivy League college. It was a workaround that paid off.

    “It was fun. I thought that one year is the best thing that ever happened to me,” he says, recalling his first prep school friends — the varsity football team — that kindly took him under its wing when he arrived too early to a shuttered dorm for his first term.

    But at an age when most American teens are getting their first set of wheels and testing the limits of their freedom, boarding students were not allowed to have cars — only day students. Having learned to drive stick shift in Hong Kong, it would be a while before Chen could get his own ride.

    “I didn’t have the money for a car,” the CEO who now pulls in over $3 million a year in salary says. “So I went through that and I went through college without cars. I had a bicycle at Brown (University) but when winter came around you quickly gave up on a bicycle. And seriously, in New England you don’t really need a car. Now when I came to California for graduate school, I bought a car.”

    Chen’s first car was a brand new 1978 or 1979 Ford Fiesta — he’s not sure which year — bought at the end of ’78.

    “It was a very square thing,” he says jovially. “It was strictly based on price — nothing else. I’m not into fancy cars and all that. It’s not really much about money or no money . . . I look at cars being practical.”

    With income from work as a teaching assistant and as a research assistant at Caltech, where he now sits as a trustee, Chen took out a loan from the Bank of Dad for the rest.

    With the suburban sprawl of Pasadena, the heat and little or no public transit, Chen needed the car to get around town. But reliability issues plagued the faltering Fiesta.

    “It would always break down and with mine it was the fan belt that would break down and overheat the engine and it was always like that. It would blow the fuse and it would sideline me.”

    Ironically, he says he purchased a new car because he didn’t know anything about cars and didn’t want to have to work fixing them.

    “I had so many problems, so much so I know where the fuse box is (located): it’s underneath the glove compartment. You could pull it out and there were about six fuses there. Because it happened so many times I bought spares because every time the car overheated it would blow the fuse.”

    Chen developed something of a routine.

    “You add the water in, let it cool down for an hour, you change the fuse and here you go again until the next time. I remember it very, very clearly. It was silly.”

    It took a couple of years before the Fiesta was more like a Siesta. Chen switched to a more reliable Honda Accord.

    He still isn’t into a blingy ride. He says half-jokingly that a recent jaunt in a low-slung Porsche jangled him up so much he wanted to book a dentist appointment to get his fillings checked.

    But he is well-versed on the future of connected-car technology. With BlackBerry’s QNX software running on about 50 million cars around the world, the unit is a promising part of the company’s turnaround strategy.

    The emphasis going forward will be on security and privacy, he says, plugging QNX as the most secure microkernel. Chen says security concerns will only grow as autonomous automobile features increase.

    “It’s not only about people stealing your data or your address book or your preferences or your identity. It’s way beyond that. It’s physical harm.”

    In the meantime, automotive concerns of a different nature are also front and centre. BlackBerry’s sponsorship contract with Formula One’s Mercedes AMG Petronas team runs out at the end of this year.

    Rumoured at a cost of more than $45-million for three years, has it been good value for money?

    “Given the conditions we were in in the last three years it worked in some places,” Chen says.

    “It doesn’t work uniformly but a lot of that isn’t about Formula One, it’s about us because when we were very preoccupied with turning around the company . . . we really didn’t take advantage of the platform . . . The fact of the matter is we haven’t truly been in a position to take advantage of their platform and everything else.”

    Chen agrees Mercedes’ F1 World Championship win in 2014 produced good foreign market exposure for BlackBerry, but he remains undecided on whether a new sponsorship deal will be signed.

    Yvonne Marton is a frequent contributor to Toronto Star Wheels.
    Two things here...

    First, the highlighted bit about the Mercedes sponsorship. I wish they would renew but it doesn't appear they will. Unfortunate.

    Second, I was just mentioning the "Communications" aspect of BlackBerry and the need to put JC at the forefront. And here is a second piece, after the Bartiromo one. Very good. With the Toronto Star, not the G&M. I wonder why.

    Cheers,
    05-29-15 05:04 PM
  14. Andrew4life's Avatar
    At the Kitchener luncheon, JC mentions (26:14) that four devices are planned for this FY. One is the Leap, one is the Slider. He talks about those two... As for the remaining two... I guess we'll have to wait.
    The other two are the Porche design version of something, I forget which. And apparently the Oslo? Which is the refined Passport?

    Posted via CB10
    rarsen, bungaboy, 3MIKE and 1 others like this.
    05-29-15 05:17 PM
  15. Corbu's Avatar
    The other two are the Porche design version of something, I forget which. And apparently the Oslo? Which is the refined Passport?
    Yes. Good point about the P version of something. As for the last one, we'll see!
    rarsen, bungaboy, bbjdog and 1 others like this.
    05-29-15 05:24 PM
  16. Corbu's Avatar
    Google IoT Announcement Offers Little on Security, Researcher Says - The CIO Report - WSJ

    Google IoT Announcement Offers Little on Security, Researcher Says

    By KIM S. NASH

    Google Inc.'s announcement Thursday of an Internet of Things platform may help bring nascent efforts at connected devices, machines and public infrastructure one step closer to broad adoption. But security, so critical to CIOs’ planning, went largely unaddressed.

    The new Brillo platform, combined with Google’s Weave protocol for managing Internet of Things items, puts the company in competition with the Open Internet Consortium backed by Intel Corp. and the AllJoyn platform backed by Qualcomm Inc. Google’s leg up, however, is a dense population of Android devices already in use, said Mark Hung, a research vice president at Gartner Inc. “Potentially, all those devices will automatically see each other, quickly creating critical mass,” Mr. Hung said.

    Google does address security with a variety of tools, a company spokeswoman said. That includes tools at the application, operating system and other layers. Google plans to support “verified boot” as an optional service. That is, devices would only run verified software, she said. Also, the company is looking for ways to support rollback protection, to prevent someone from installing older software they know is insecure. Google plans to make the Weave protocol itself secure, she added.

    Google discussed the technologies at its developer conference this week. But one important enterprise topic that was glossed over, Mr. Hung said, was security. Specifically, how Brillo will address breaches, patches and other security problems that could affect corporate networks, he said. “It’s an issue for all Internet of Things technology, but the other proposals take this into account,” he said.

    CIOs contemplating how to use connected devices, and the data they generate, in revenue-generating projects must consider security implications of any new platform, he said.

    Overall, CIOs ought to watch developments in Google’s new consumer technologies, Mr. Hung said, including a digital payments system for Android devices and a service for sharing photos. Several years ago, employees forced the notion of bring-your-own-device onto the CIO’s agenda, as they started to use personal smartphones and tablets at work.

    “When BYOD came up, CIOs were caught off guard,” he said. “Now they know that one day – perhaps one day very soon – they will have to contend with these new technologies in their enterprise.”
    05-29-15 05:29 PM
  17. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security

    Bartiromo: BlackBerry's Chen on privacy and security

    "First, cut costs in the hardware business. I believe we can do that with some level of collaboration or partnership. Not doing everything myself is important. So we'll be able to focus on really great design and security and privacy"


    This explains the recent layoffs with a bit more clarity(for me anyway).

    Would love to know more about this "collaboration or partnership " bit and if there is more to be told....

    Big news there!!!
    Last edited by BACK-2-BLACK; 05-29-15 at 05:48 PM.
    rarsen, Corbu, bungaboy and 7 others like this.
    05-29-15 05:31 PM
  18. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    Yes. Good point about the P version of something. As for the last one, we'll see!
    I hope the All Touch Oslo PP makes the cut!!!

    Check out this render from another thread:

    I6+, All Touch Oslo PP , Note

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-crackberry-image-1-.jpg
    rarsen, bungaboy, Corbu and 6 others like this.
    05-29-15 05:38 PM
  19. Supa_Fly1's Avatar
    When media takes the story and says Blackberry only sold 8000 passports in the US it paints a picture that no one is buy them and the phone must suck. And Blackberry couldn't respond to the story.

    It alters perceptive, which impacts brand and desirability, which impacts sales/revenue.
    The word is perception, in the use case above not perceptive that's a state of being. I'd have thought BlackBerry users would know about the differences but I aim to learn continuously

    BlackBerry, accept no substitute nor compromise!
    05-29-15 05:52 PM
  20. Corbu's Avatar
    Since we are talking concepts and potential future devices, from another thread...

    Both curved screens...

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-mona-lisa-1.jpg

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-mona-lisa-2.jpg

    http://forums.crackberry.com/blackbe...ncept-1021002/
    rarsen, bungaboy, kadakn01 and 9 others like this.
    05-29-15 06:06 PM
  21. bungaboy's Avatar
    Since we are talking concepts and potential future devices, from another thread...

    Both curved screens...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    http://forums.crackberry.com/blackbe...ncept-1021002/
    Apple invented Mona Lisa . . .

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-792951a5fd18aa38ff231e7ef44b8e17.jpg
    05-29-15 06:21 PM
  22. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    So you thought M. Shatey had timing sense ?
    So does MasterChen.
    http://crackberry.com/john-chen-priv...source=message

    I LOVE to read the exact same thing than expected.
    Same plan, still valid with same perspectives.
    Let's FUDCK them (sorry for rudeness, not!)

    Posted via CB10
    05-29-15 06:28 PM
  23. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    Surely BlackBerry must have known the Passport wouldn't sell well considering the brand perception and not much advertising? Strangers stop me all the time to ask about my sexy white Passport, and that's flattering, but it's also maybe not to great considering the phone's been out since the fall? On the plus side, the reviews have been much better than the Z10 and Q10 etc. I guess they were just trying to avoid further embarrassment for now and start building from there?

    Posted via CB10
    Don't worry tiny panties, it's called an unfair advantage, and I am milking it all the way.

    As an investor, I am more focused on how well BlackBerry fares with the software, services, IoT, and of course, stock price.
    05-29-15 06:51 PM
  24. spiller's Avatar
    The word is perception, in the use case above not perceptive that's a state of being. I'd have thought BlackBerry users would know about the differences but I aim to learn continuously

    BlackBerry, accept no substitute nor compromise!
    Yep. Not sure how that came out. Maybe I swiped up without seeing the word accurately

    Posted via CB10
    05-29-15 06:55 PM
  25. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20150529_105011.png 
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    Anyone keen to check which of these organizations have a TP below where we are now?

    Posted via CB10
    Can't help you there Dusdal, but looks like someone bought 62,000 shares today. Can someone check that?
    Last edited by Bacon Munchers; 05-29-15 at 07:58 PM.
    05-29-15 07:44 PM
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