View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1110. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    694 62.52%
  • No

    416 37.48%
  1. bspence87's Avatar
    Well, yeah, I do think a focused, limited ad campaign in key cities is a good idea. I'm not sure how 'c'mon' proved otherwise, but we can leave the topic alone for now and see how things play out. I agree that Chen is doing his best, but I also think BlackBerry shown themselves to be weak in the consumer strategy department, and I am not sure they've solved that problem yet. There is a difference between holding back out of deep wisdom, and holding back because of a lack of understanding or confidence, and BlackBerry, on the consumer front, are probably in the latter category at the moment. As I said though, we've had a bit of a discussion about it, and we can probably leave it there for now. Maybe the current strategy really is the best one, and maybe it isn't. We won't ever know for sure because we can run any parallel universe experiments. Again, to end with a positive, they've finally gone and priced a device properly, with the Leap (let's ignore the awful name) opening at 199. Hopefully, that proves to be the start of good things.

    Posted via CB10
    There, I've bolded everyone else's point.
    When the money's coming in, it can go back out.
    Sustainability before hope. That's a strategy I can get behind (or "SUPPORT", if you will)



    Posted via CB10
    04-02-15 03:03 AM
  2. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Are you saying you can sell your stake right now and profit 25%?
    Because if so,...you would be foolish not too.
    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    Yes, that's what I'm saying.
    BUT, my target is not 25%; it's way more.
    So, I sure could exit now, take my gains and wait for an hypothetical currency parity reversal.
    But this is unlikely to happen in the next months ... and I feel naked w/o my BBRY shares !

    So, instead, I'm glad I have here a free "25% downside insurance" and a potential "25% booster" if ever I decide to sell. As of date, the former secures my investment and I'm glad I don't have to fear sub CAN$ 9s.
    As stated in OP, I'm not here to speculate; I'm here to align my words and acts together (support) and state my "faith" in a much brighter future for BlackBerry. Treat me fool; I'm in here for a multiplier that decency forbids to print

    That's the essence of this thread.

    P.S: while at it ... guys, everyone is free to participate and while I promise I'll be more present in a near future to (try to) avoid too much Armchair CEO OT or blatant negativity (not pointing to anyone right now), could we ALL mix some water in our wine (* crime ! *) and keep away the personal controversy ? Thanks !

    (worse a close listening to lyrics, IMHO)



    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-makeitfunky.png
    04-02-15 03:46 AM
  3. bungaboy's Avatar
    "To Read the Full Story, Subscribe or Log In"
    3MIKE and La Emperor like this.
    04-02-15 06:45 AM
  4. KenFletch's Avatar
    If Canada blocks a sale to Samsung or someone else at this point, they should bail the company out and give it some serious tax credits. It's not fair to shareholders. Did anyone think that the company could never sell its assets when they bought in 2 or more years ago? What discount do you apply to account for this?



    Posted via CB10
    Pretty sure the way the Canadian gov is "helping" is by making a big move to BES12. I work in Ottawa and people I know in gov started showing up with Q10s starting a few months ago. A lot were probably given away previously marked down stock.

    That's a big customer.

    There would never have been any doubt about this sale. Shows how long it took for BB10 and BES12 to really be ready and then start being incorporated.

    Posted with my flash Passport
    Corbu, bungaboy, jxnb and 13 others like this.
    04-02-15 06:54 AM
  5. Corbu's Avatar
    "To Read the Full Story, Subscribe or Log In"
    Sorry about that. Rather long but I think it might be of interest to some, here.

    How Computers Trawl a Sea of Data for Stock Picks

    Funds managing billions hunt for investment clues in newswires, weather, Twitter

    BRADLEY HOPE
    April 1, 2015 10:30 p.m. ET

    NEW YORK—In SoHo offices where robots occasionally ply the hallways, dozens of Ph.D. scientists with degrees in fields like astrophysics, immunology and linguistics huddle every day around computer screens that show billions of dollars zapping around the world.

    Their goal: to give their secretive hedge-fund firm a leg up in investing the $24 billion it has under management. Scientists at the firm, Two Sigma Investments LLC, program its machines to cull torrents of information from sources like newswires, earnings reports, weather bulletins and Twitter.

    They then write trading algorithms that make stock picks based on what they call “signals” in those data.

    Two Sigma is part of a new frontier in computerized investing, in which scientists and engineers with little formal financial training are trying to funnel massive computing power into predicting securities prices by drawing from clues in news and data.

    “The secret of the markets is they can be predicted,” says Alexander Migdal, a former Soviet physicist in Princeton, N.J., who writes algorithms to predict securities prices based on a broad set of data, such as news feeds. “Not 100%, of course, but just enough to make a difference, to make a profit.”

    The approach is a form of so-called quantitative investing, because its trades rely mainly on mathematical models. But its practitioners differ from traditional “quants,” who program their computers to bet on statistical relationships among securities prices and don’t bother much with real-world information.

    Instead, these practitioners’ aim is to get an advantage over human stock pickers by writing algorithms that are smarter and faster than any person could be in scouring the world’s information, finding patterns and making trading decisions in stocks, bonds, options, futures or currencies.

    At Two Sigma, the strategy works like this:

    In determining how to trade the stock of, say, a major big-box retailer, Two Sigma’s scientists and mathematicians devise dozens of computer-trading models related to the stock.

    One model would automatically pore through analysts’ research for patterns in how they view the retailer—much as a human broker might. Another would look for clues in Twitter: It might identify one pattern—a growing number of customers tweeting complaints, say—and correlate that with another pattern, such as data showing fewer people visiting stores.

    Additional algorithms would do other tasks human investors traditionally perform: watching for the stock price to break through a 200-day average, say, or monitoring whether executives are buying or selling company shares.

    Each model would produce a trade suggestion, which would go through an algorithm written to weigh each idea based on its model’s historical performance and other factors. Then, a risk-management algorithm would check the suggested trade to make sure it didn’t overexpose the firm to the stock or sector. Finally, an execution system would automatically place a trade.

    A model might take weeks for scientists to perfect. Once programmed into computers, a model might act in seconds or less.

    “Most investment managers operate more or less the way they operated decades ago: Their investments are made using their brains,” says Two Sigma co-founder David Siegel.The firm’s systems constitute artificial intelligence, he says, and “represent the future of investment management.”

    The firm typically holds investments for days, weeks or months.

    Investing arms race

    Companies like Mr. Siegel’s are beginning a new investing arms race on and off Wall Street. Some are tiny startups. Major quant firms are also exploring the strategy. Hedge-fund firms Renaissance Technologies LLC, with $25 billion under management, and D.E. Shaw & Co., with $36 billion, have explored similar operations, say people familiar with the companies. Both firms decline to comment for this article.

    Such firms are part of a broader quest among businesses of all types to profit from so-called big data, the world’s growing flood of information on just about everything, by doing what’s often called “data mining.”

    “The computational power available today, combined with the ability to store huge amounts of data, has allowed us to do things that were simply not possible before,” says Petter Kolm, director of the mathematics-in-finance program at New York University’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, which has sent graduates to Two Sigma and other firms that do data mining.

    “We can solve problems now in real-time,” he says, “that would have taken days and weeks a decade ago.”

    Firms practicing the approach tend to be secretive, and there are no data on how many companies or how much money is involved. People at such firms, and academics who study them, say strategies they write into their algorithms vary, as do the levels of human involvement during trading.

    Some of the strategies worry some who say they may expose investors to undue risk. Among skeptics is Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates LP, the world’s biggest hedge-fund firm. While not speaking specifically of Two Sigma, Mr. Dalio believes some such methods risk placing big bets on “spurious” relationships, a Bridgewater spokesman says.

    Professors from University of California, Davis, and several other institutions warned in an April 2014 research paper of a trend of “overfitting” in math-based trading by hedge funds and other money managers, in which random correlations are interpreted wrongly as strong relationships.

    ‘Pseudo-math’

    They concluded that “pseudo-mathematics” and “financial charlatanism” were running rampant on Wall Street. Such bad math, they wrote, “is a large part of the reason why so many algorithmic and systematic hedge funds do not live up to the elevated expectations generated by their managers.”

    Some practitioners of the data-mining approach have failed to make it a business. Flyberry Capital LLC, a $2 million Cambridge, Mass., hedge-fund firm tested trading strategies based on reacting immediately to news events such as earthquakes near the coast of Japan. Its founder said he was especially interested in predicting how different investors would react to events like surprise changes in nonfarm-payroll statistics or the national energy supply. The firm closed earlier this year because it couldn’t attract enough investors, a spokesman says.

    Two Sigma casts itself as a safe bet in a jittery, interconnected world where human judgment alone is no longer effective. “Do you want your doctor operating off of gut instinct?” Mr. Siegel asks. “I don’t. I want my doctor to be analytical in their diagnosis and use scientific procedures in their treatment. The same can be said for investment management.”

    Mr. Siegel, 53 years old, founded Two Sigma in 2001 with mathematician John Overdeck,45. It was ranked 22nd largest of 305 U.S. firms as of September 2014 by HedgeFund Intelligence, a data-and-research firm.

    Last year, it raised a $3.3 billion “macro” fund—one of the largest hedge funds launched since the financial crisis. Another, its $6 billion Compass fund focusing on futures and currencies, returned more than 25% in 2014. The company’s website says its investors “include some of the world’s largest corporate and public pension plans, sovereign wealth funds, research institutions, educational endowments, hospitals and healthcare systems, and foundations.”

    Two Sigma’s funds all take a big-data approach. Among its data sources are news bulletins, National Weather Service reports, market data, tweets and information from smartphone users who have agreed to be tracked by a retail-trend-analysis company.

    Employees writing the algorithms typically have backgrounds in fields like physics, chemistry or machine learning—scientists adept at parsing large amounts of data. More than 100 employees have doctorates.

    Thirty years ago, it was easier to make investment picks because the world wasn’t as interconnected, Mr. Siegel says. “Here’s the problem: What affects the price of a share of Apple stock? The answer: Pretty much everything. Absolutely every little thing has some effect. Every sale, every earthquake.”

    Mr. Migdal, the former Soviet physicist, after leaving academia started a high-frequency-trading firm using computers to zip in and out of markets, earning tiny profits on hundreds of thousands of transactions. But he believes the profit opportunity there is diminishing. His new company, Migdal Research LLC, is devoted to longer-term predictions based on a broader data set.

    Mr. Migdal, 69, compares data to water drops before they form a river. “Many little movements of the drop may become a flow,” he says. “Not all the events in the financial world take the form of dramatic and obvious announcements. Quite often, they begin as small drops moving in the same direction in a way that isn’t immediately visible to the human observer.”

    Still, says NYU’s Mr. Kolm, computers aren’t close to being omniscient: “For the majority of financial-prediction models, the degree of certainty is much, much weaker” than even weather forecasts.

    One risk, critics say, is a repeat of the 2007 “quant meltdown,” when models with similar assumptions broke down simultaneously at many firms. Long-Term Capital Management L.P.’s collapse in the late 1990s is also a stark memory: Backed by two Nobel Prize winners, it used mathematical methods to identify arbitrage opportunities but imploded in 1998, causing ripples across the financial sector.

    Bridgewater, whose founder has expressed concern about data-mining, says it has invested in capability to analyze data. But its strategies are based on a “deep understanding of the logical cause-effect economic relationships that drive markets,” the spokesman says. In other words, humans come up with hypotheses and test them with powerful computers, rather than letting computers drive the entire process.

    Two Sigma recently suffered a large loss when one fund dropped more than 12% in January after the Swiss National Bank abolished a currency cap and the Franc surged, says a person familiar with the fund. The fund was up 8% in February, the person says.

    But the firm touts long-term consistency. One of its first funds, Spectrum, has an annualized return of 9.49% after fees and hasn’t had a down year since its 2004 creation, say people familiar with its performance.

    Inspiration from robots

    A walk through its offices shows how far it is from traditional Wall Street. In a room called the “Hacker’s Lab” where staff work on side projects, a researcher prints out an ergonomic keyboard on a 3-D printer while another teaches a robot to play air hockey. A robot from the lab occasionally plays shuffleboard in hallways.

    Mr. Siegel earned a computer-science Ph.D. at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he studied at its Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He is a lover of robotics and believes the Hackers Lab encourages staff to think differently about investing. He calls human investors “non-computer traders.”

    To comb through data 24 hours a day, the firm has more than 100 teraflops of power—more than 100 trillion calculations a second—and more than 11 petabytes of storage, the equivalent of five times the data stored in all U.S. academic libraries.

    It tightly guards its strategies, but a recent hiring campaign aimed at engineers from firms like Facebook Inc. and Twitter Inc. gives a glimpse. Prospective recruits don virtual-reality headsets that bring them through a frenetic Times Square and fly them over buildings in Dubai. “A lot to take in, isn’t there?” a male voice says. “Shopping, trends, traffic.”

    What if, the voice continues, there were a burst of headlines about a volcanic eruption in Kamchatka, Russia? If the ash caused air-traffic delays, what would that mean for oil prices? “And that’s what we do at Two Sigma,” the voice says, “look for connections that make sense of it all.”

    The company, which has grown to about 750 employees and is looking to hire 100 more engineers, needs brain power for a constant challenge: Where physicists in academia seek immutable laws, scientists writing these trading algorithms unearth patterns whose value disappears quickly as others discover them.

    Profits hinge more on whether these firms’ cultures of experimentation can repeatedly give an edge than on discovering a “fortune’s formula,” says James Weatherall, author of “The Physics of Wall Street: A Brief History of Predicting the Unpredictable,” who has studied firms like Two Sigma.

    The risk, he says: “If everyone is using the same models, you end up with weird market behavior.”
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-p1-bt269_predic_16u_20150401173316.jpg

    04-02-15 07:11 AM
  6. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Scotia Bank raises BB price target to 12:50:
    http://www.lulegacy.com/2015/04/02/b...k-bbry/430132/

    Classically Posted.
    Corbu, georg4BB, bungaboy and 18 others like this.
    04-02-15 07:16 AM
  7. Corbu's Avatar
    04-02-15 07:27 AM
  8. Supa_Fly1's Avatar
    We saw that. Blackberry called me first thing this morning and wanted to know what to do with your 10 shares.
    So what is the point of this post and insult? I have only 10 shares as if yesterday so who cares? Are you above me cause you have more, or above him??

    This is the kind of arrogance breeding on the boards/community that drives so many people away from BlackBerry which is the very opposite of what we, and BlackBerry ultimately all want.

    Big things come from small beginnings.

    Posted via CB10
    04-02-15 07:38 AM
  9. W Hoa's Avatar
    BBM Shop celebrates first birthday, has been visited 1.5 billion times

    The BBM Shop was created to help BlackBerry monetize its messaging app. By selling items like stickers, BlackBerry has had more than 1.5 billion visits to the BBM Shop since it went live on April 1st 2014. During the year that just passed, 1.87 billion stickers have been sold by BlackBerry. The BBM Shop currently has more than 250 items for sale, and besides stickers you will find various apps and games.

    The average month sees 250 million visits to the BBM Shop and the average Shop user visits three times a week. These visitors must be buying stickers as 500 million of them are sold each month. 20% of those using stickers on their messages send a least one each week. The average user sends 10 messages with stickers during the typical week.

    Sticker use has really surged even as the number of visits to the BBM Shop has risen more gradually. BlackBerry CEO John Chen says that the company plans on continuing to look for ways to monetize BBM and the BBM shop. It should be interesting to see what new things might be in store for the messaging app this year.
    04-02-15 07:41 AM
  10. lcjr's Avatar
    So what is the point of this post and insult? I have only 10 shares as if yesterday so who cares? Are you above me cause you have more, or above him??

    This is the kind of arrogance breeding on the boards/community that drives so many people away from BlackBerry which is the very opposite of what we, and BlackBerry ultimately all want.

    Big things come from small beginnings.

    Posted via CB10
    He knows I was kidding. I'll bet almost everyone on this thread besides you knows I was kidding. Have a nice day.

    Posted via CB10
    04-02-15 07:50 AM
  11. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    So what is the point of this post and insult? I have only 10 shares as if yesterday so who cares? Are you above me cause you have more, or above him??

    This is the kind of arrogance breeding on the boards/community that drives so many people away from BlackBerry which is the very opposite of what we, and BlackBerry ultimately all want.

    Big things come from small beginnings.

    Posted via CB10
    NO, you misunderstood. Lenny was just joking. He knew that Bugga had/has more than 10 shares.
    04-02-15 07:52 AM
  12. Supa_Fly1's Avatar
    Yes, that's what I'm saying.
    BUT, my target is not 25%; it's way more.
    So, I sure could exit now, take my gains and wait for an hypothetical currency parity reversal.
    But this is unlikely to happen in the next months ... and I feel naked w/o my BBRY shares !

    So, instead, I'm glad I have here a free "25% downside insurance" and a potential "25% booster" if ever I decide to sell. As of date, the former secures my investment and I'm glad I don't have to fear sub CAN$ 9s.
    As stated in OP, I'm not here to speculate; I'm here to align my words and acts together (support) and state my "faith" in a much brighter future for BlackBerry. Treat me fool; I'm in here for a multiplier that decency forbids to print

    That's the essence of this thread.

    P.S: while at it ... guys, everyone is free to participate and while I promise I'll be more present in a near future to (try to) avoid too much Armchair CEO OT or blatant negativity (not pointing to anyone right now), could we ALL mix some water in our wine (* crime ! *) and keep away the personal controversy ? Thanks !

    (worse a close listening to lyrics, IMHO)



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	makeitFunky.png 
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ID:	345129
    Well put and that is why I began buying shares: putting my faith, confidence, and my work support into a financial representation for BlackBerry.

    I stand by "a man's words and actions must agree". I've faltered in this greatly lately so I'm making corrections. Profit from Apple stock $48 in 2 months with the sell translated into $256 CAN thus far 10 BB:CAN stock. With some $ to spare. If the stock drops today then dollar cost average I'll grab more.

    Posted via CB10
    Corbu, plasmid_boy, zyben and 2 others like this.
    04-02-15 07:53 AM
  13. Supa_Fly1's Avatar
    NO, you misunderstood. Lenny was just joking. He knew that Bugga had/has more than 10 shares.
    DOH!

    OK cool then. But we do see far too much hate like that around the other threads. Lcr, scratch my comment then. Apologies.

    Any projections today?!

    Posted via CB10
    Corbu, jxnb, gg22 and 10 others like this.
    04-02-15 07:55 AM
  14. Komoto's Avatar
    I think that people need to remember we are social creatures. What this means is that social interactions have effects on our actions.

    With regards to bbry, I don't think there is a massive conspiracy, maybe a little one.

    Take for example if you are an analyst, if you put out a negative note it is easier to justify your view. if you put out a positive report you have to justify it, because e of the general sentiment towards BBRY.

    Humans are very much a kick him while he's down type of creature.
    it is safer to stick with the pack.

    You watch, if the turn around is successful all of the people will flip all of a sudden to stick with the pack.
    The fact of the matter is going against the pack is usually higher risk, but also higher return.

    Also as the pack effects the pack, a sort of heisenburgs principle, it can have a knock on effect.

    The contrarian therefore sets to gain more, but also risks more and must know what he is doing to survive.

    As for what I think of earnings, this was the lowest I have personally been. It was the first time Chen didn't convince me 100 per cent, maybe 85. I think they are not going to grow as quickly as I hoped, but I think my expectations were higher than chens.

    I think Chen is finding it harder to convert people to a paying customer, he admitted up selling is hard.

    The same reasons I invested in the beginning still exist, so I stick with it.

    It is still, in my opinion, a solid investment.

    Posted via CB10
    04-02-15 08:06 AM
  15. Corbu's Avatar
    04-02-15 08:07 AM
  16. laketrout73's Avatar
    "To Read the Full Story, Subscribe or Log In"
    Hey, I thought you left yesterday! :P

    Q10SQN100-1/10.3.1.2267 | Bell | via CB10
    04-02-15 08:19 AM
  17. bungaboy's Avatar
    Hey, I thought you left yesterday! :P

    Q10SQN100-1/10.3.1.2267 | Bell | via CB10
    Well, I clicked the heels of my brown shoes together 3 times and . . . voila!
    04-02-15 08:56 AM
  18. morganplus8's Avatar
    Just a quick chart to show everyone that we bottomed out at the end of the quarter this week (fund selling is over) and have based for a rally here:

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-bbry-april-2-2015.png

    We are at the breakout point of an RSI = 30 (over-sold) and an 3-ema of $8.97/shr, let's close above that $ 8.97 level and start the run back to the the top of the sideways channel.
    04-02-15 09:04 AM
  19. plasmid_boy's Avatar

    Humans are very much a kick him while he's down type of creature.
    it is safer to stick with the pack.


    Posted via CB10
    That's a basic animal instinct. That's how they/we get food in the wild. What makes us human is that we have the ability to over ride that instinct with logic. Unfortunately some people don't think deeply enough to make use of that unique ability.
    04-02-15 09:07 AM
  20. primusd's Avatar
    Just a quick chart to show everyone that we bottomed out at the end of the quarter this week (fund selling is over) and have based for a rally here:
    Thanks! Any chance of seeing a version of this for TSE:BB for those of us trading there? I promise not to ask every time you post an update... just to have one for reference.
    CDM76 and 3MIKE like this.
    04-02-15 09:30 AM
  21. sidhuk's Avatar
    8-9 million, same page visits per day is pretty impressive no matter how I look at it. A small ad on that page might add towards BBM income.

    Posted with BlackBerry Passport
    04-02-15 09:32 AM
  22. woofster's Avatar
    Just a quick chart to show everyone that we bottomed out at the end of the quarter this week (fund selling is over) and have based for a rally here:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BBRY April 2 2015.png 
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    We are at the breakout point of an RSI = 30 (over-sold) and an 3-ema of $8.97/shr, let's close above that $ 8.97 level and start the run back to the the top of the sideways channel.
    That's what I'm seeing too. The MACD line is slowly making its way up to cross the signal line and I am anticipating that it will do so next week. I suspect BBRY may close below 9 going into the Easter weekend however, but as long as it doesn't break down this afternoon, we should be on our way back into normal trading range next week.
    04-02-15 09:41 AM
  23. KenFletch's Avatar
    Ordered mine already. Can't wait for the one you can drive

    Posted with my flash Passport
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    04-02-15 09:42 AM
  24. morganplus8's Avatar
    Thanks! Any chance of seeing a version of this for TSE:BB for those of us trading there? I promise not to ask every time you post an update... just to have one for reference.
    I'm glad you asked for that chart, it gives me a chance to show everyone that the CDN chart is not workable for TA purposes. The US chart is free of the fluctuation in currencies, as you can plainly see, the CDN chart paints a rosy picture of a great investment that is trading higher in value over the past 10 months.

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-bbto-april-2-2015.png

    If you own BBRY, you know that this stock has not been trading in an up-sloping channel over the past 10 months. The currency is at play here to save holders of the CDN stock, BB.TO, and if and when the Canadian dollar begins to firm again, Canadian investors will feel the pain of watching the US stock climb higher while their investment in Canada does nothing. For a chartist, you want to chart the stock in the currency that does not fluctuate and that only leaves you with the US version, BBRY. In fact, the CDN dollar has distorted the Canadian chart so much that I can't even define the trading pattern now.

    So watch out for a rally in BlackBerry that coincides with a rally in the CDN dollar as you won't be participating to the same degree as your American counterpart. A quick example, say BBRY is trading at $ 10.00 and the currency conversion is $ 1.10 CDN needed for one US dollar. The CDN price of the stock, or BB.TO would be $ 11.00/shr/CDN. Now if the CDN dollar goes to par, then the CDN price would simply be $ 10.00 CDN or $ 10.00 US, both are the same here. So as an investor who owns Canadian BlackBerry, you lose out when the US dollar weakens to the Canadian dollar.
    04-02-15 10:16 AM
  25. jake simmons3's Avatar
    I'm glad you asked for that chart, it gives me a chance to show everyone that the CDN chart is not workable for TA purposes. The US chart is free of the fluctuation in currencies, as you can plainly see, the CDN chart paints a rosy picture of a great investment that is trading higher in value over the past 10 months.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BBTO April 2 2015.png 
Views:	2093 
Size:	69.7 KB 
ID:	345172

    If you own BBRY, you know that this stock has not been trading in an up-sloping channel over the past 10 months. The currency is at play here to save holders of the CDN stock, BB.TO, and if and when the Canadian dollar begins to firm again, Canadian investors will feel the pain of watching the US stock climb higher while their investment in Canada does nothing. For a chartist, you want to chart the stock in the currency that does not fluctuate and that only leaves you with the US version, BBRY. In fact, the CDN dollar has distorted the Canadian chart so much that I can't even define the trading pattern now.

    So watch out for a rally in BlackBerry that coincides with a rally in the CDN dollar as you won't be participating to the same degree as your American counterpart. A quick example, say BBRY is trading at $ 10.00 and the currency conversion is $ 1.10 CDN needed for one US dollar. The CDN price of the stock, or BB.TO would be $ 11.00/shr/CDN. Now if the CDN dollar goes to par, then the CDN price would simply be $ 10.00 CDN or $ 10.00 US, both are the same here. So as an investor who owns Canadian BlackBerry, you lose out when the US dollar weakens to the Canadian dollar.
    That is if you believe you will see a strong Canadian dollar anytime soon. I for one don't and can see it to continue to fall. Canadian dollar goes hand in end with the price of oil. So if you think oil will be weak for the coming time then so will the Canadian dollar.
    awindsr, rarsen, 3MIKE and 1 others like this.
    04-02-15 10:43 AM
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