View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1110. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    694 62.52%
  • No

    416 37.48%
  1. bbjdog's Avatar
    Hey gents can you do me a huge favor by not highlights in yellow. I'm reading from my BlackBerry with dark theme of course and it's awful trying to put words together. Thanks

    #BBFactCheck
    It's time you get out of the dark.

    No problem.
    Bacon Munchers likes this.
    03-17-15 09:14 PM
  2. bbjdog's Avatar
    Corbu, nice editing on the article!

    Seems like Blackberry needs to be saved every week. When I attend church, I'll be asking the almighty to save Blackberry.

    Jokers!
    03-17-15 09:20 PM
  3. Corbu's Avatar
    Corbu, nice editing on the article!

    Seems like Blackberry needs to be saved every week. When I attend church, I'll be asking the almighty to save Blackberry.

    Jokers!
    Thanks! I'll follow your lead and do likewise!
    bbjdog and Soumaila Somtore like this.
    03-17-15 09:23 PM
  4. BanffMoose's Avatar
    It's time you get out of the dark.

    No problem.
    Oh man, on light theme, the screen is bright! But at least I can now read yellow highlights! Thanks! (now off to adjust display settings for the light theme.)

    Posted via CB10
    03-17-15 09:27 PM
  5. bbjdog's Avatar
    Oh man, on light theme, the screen is bright! But at least I can now read yellow highlights! Thanks! (now off to adjust display settings for the light theme.)

    Posted via CB10
    I'm glad you seen the light.
    03-17-15 09:42 PM
  6. lcjr's Avatar
    Ford/Sync3 using Microsoft Azure for the connected car. Gives us a glimpse of what's to come.
    Nice thing is anytime a new service update, bug fixes on the car system, etc. is required QNX is involved right in the middle of it.
    More $$ coming.




    Ford turns back to Microsoft to build connected-car services | Technology | Reuters
    I'm excited about this to my friend! I'll add two things on the wish list for the QNX SYNC programming: 1. Integrate into home network once in the driveway or garage without manipulation...once you're home it connects and does any updates and/or fixes automatically and provides a report of any updates or changes. 2. Collect the data and render feedback on all email, texts, or phone calls received. Currently SYNC only recognizes normal text messages and not from apps like BBM or Whatsapp.

    Posted via Passport
    03-17-15 10:55 PM
  7. lcjr's Avatar
    Thanks buddy, I'm all over this subject and have much to say, but it's all personal opinion so I'll leave it. I will say that I still don't understand why they continue to require the owner to do manual updates or see the stealership. Sure, if you don't want anybody found automatic updates or fixes than set that up in your settings, but if you're like me and want it done automatically we should have that option too. Especially when a good F150 has a sticker price of $60,000+. When I'm home it should connect to my home network and do those things for me...for that price. That option should be available. Thanks for listening. Lol.

    Posted via Passport
    03-17-15 11:04 PM
  8. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    He downgrades us with basic defamation, then goes on TV with a "...we think it will be big" comment about software earnings this ER.

    Huh?

    Thanks for the advice Mr. Agnostic.
    He is the best worst anaylist.
    His expression looked liked he was reading cue cards, or perhaps it was due to being beside Amber?
    Last edited by Bacon Munchers; 03-18-15 at 02:47 AM.
    03-18-15 02:02 AM
  9. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    I just can't wait to see the breakdown of all these mega companies pay services, so we can scoop up the pieces.
    Already, Apple is stumbling. Good thing it wasn't their fault(!)
    03-18-15 02:21 AM
  10. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    AH:
    All in good fun...

    I've said it before: I believe we collectively know more about BlackBerry and understand what it is trying to achieve better than many so-called experts...

    Isn't it time we should begin "contributing" to media such as the once reputable Forbes?

    And please, does anyone know where they find and how they choose their "contributors" some of which are university professors, such as this one (nothing personal, though)?

    Case in point...

    Can IBM And Samsung Save BlackBerry's Global Tablet Market Strategy? - Forbes
    That was a fun read.
    One point of constructive criticism for you though:
    I am noticing that your clippings are becoming too 'fractionalizing'.

    !
    Corbu likes this.
    03-18-15 02:42 AM
  11. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Morning gents...so, what's consensus on today's US interest rate guidance and how will market react?

    I think they will rise...and market will still go up. (for at least a bit...to scoop up all the weak hands shorting)

    Classically Posted.
    3MIKE, Corbu, bbjdog and 3 others like this.
    03-18-15 08:20 AM
  12. Corbu's Avatar
    Good question Shane!

    The WSJ's take on things:
    Fed?s Bid for Flexibility on Rates Sets Stage for Market Volatility - WSJ

    The Federal Reserve is about to inject uncertainty back into financial markets after spending years trying to calm investors’ nerves with explicit assurances that interest rates would remain low.

    Ahead of their policy meeting that ends Wednesday, Fed officials have signaled they want to drop the latest iteration in a succession of low-rate promises—a line in their policy statement pledging to be “patient” before deciding to raise rates.

    The move could be a test for investors. In theory, less-clear-cut interest-rate guidance from the Fed should lead to more volatility in financial markets. That’s because investors will be left less certain about a key variable in every asset-valuation model: the cost of funds.

    Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, warned Tuesday that markets could be heading for a repeat of the 2013 “taper tantrum,” in which stocks fell and interest rates rose around the world as the Fed considered winding down its “quantitative easing” bond-buying program.

    “I am afraid this may not be a one-off episode,” she said of 2013 in a speech at India’s central bank. “The timing of interest-rate liftoff and the pace of subsequent rate increase can still surprise markets.”

    The central bank for years has been using carefully chosen words about the likely level and direction of short-term rates as policy tool, hoping promises about the future will influence other borrowing costs today, such as the level of long-term rates on mortgages or car loans.

    The approach has become particularly important since December 2008, when the Fed pushed its benchmark federal funds rate to zero amid the financial crisis and began promising it would stay there for an extended period.

    With the labor market healing and inflation expected to move back toward their 2% target, Fed officials hope they’re ready to move on, at least rhetorically. They see this as progress—before they believed the economy was so weak they shouldn’t signal rate increases were anywhere on the horizon.

    In addition to signaling that the Fed expects to consider raising rates later this year, the move away from a patience promise is part of the central bank’s broader effort to avoid pinning itself down in the future. Fed officials themselves are uncertain about when to start the process of raising rates and want flexibility to respond to new information about how the economy is evolving.

    Right now measures of market volatility are sending divergent signals.

    Stock-market volatility is relatively subdued.

    The Chicago Board Option Exchange’s stock volatility index, for example, has averaged 17 this year, above last year’s 14 but below its average of 21 between 2009 and 2014. The higher the measure, known as the VIX, the more volatility.

    At the same time, however, measures of short-term interest rate and currency volatility have picked up, a potential warning sign of tumult to come. Merrill Lynch’s MOVE index, which tracks expected interest-rate volatility, has risen to levels seen in 2013, when the taper tantrum started.

    Torsten Slok, chief international economist at Deutsche Bank Securities, said this rate volatility portends broader turbulence.

    “The risk here is that when volatility goes up in rates it will be spilling over into other asset classes,” he said.

    Such turmoil could affect other borrowing costs for U.S. households and businesses, such as rates on mortgages, credit cards and corporate bonds. It could also hit their stock portfolios and 401(k) saving accounts.

    A generation ago central bankers prided themselves on silence and obscurity.

    “I spend a substantial amount of my time endeavoring to fend off questions and worry terribly I might end up being too clear,” former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan joked in 1995.

    But Mr. Greenspan began experimenting with interest-rate guidance in 2003, when inflation was low and the job market soft. The Fed offered an assurance to investors that short-term rates—then 1%—would remain low for a “considerable period.”

    When the Fed started raising rates in 2004, it kept reassuring investors it would move them up at a “measured pace” and proceeded to raise its benchmark rate by a quarter percentage point at 17 straight meetings. Fed officials, afraid of market turmoil, wanted to tamp down the market’s reaction to the beginning of rate increases.

    Mr. Greenspan’s successor as Fed chairman, Ben Bernanke, at times moved more aggressively than expected with short-term rate cuts in 2008. He then adopted assurances they would stay low, hoping such language would hold down long-term interest rates to provide an added boost to a damaged economy in need of stimulus. The Fed also wanted to be more transparent about its thinking.

    Now, as the economy improves, Fed officials hope, the stimulative boost from low-rate promises has become less necessary.

    Officials today see a fine line between transparency and tying their hands. Many believe the Fed’s “measured pace” guidance during 2004 to 2006 was a mistake, because it locked them in to predictable rate changes and betrayed their own uncertainty about the outlook.

    Fed officials now believe the central bank needs to be able to alter its pace of rate changes as the economy evolves. “We’d probably not like to repeat a sequence in which there was a measured pace and [quarter-percentage-point] moves at every meeting,” Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen said in a December press conference. “I certainly don’t want to encourage you to think that there will be a repeat of that.”

    They have other misgivings about the guidance they’ve given in the past. One is an appearance that they are tied to specific dates for action.

    “There is no good reason that I can see for us to have to telegraph every action that we need to take,” Fed Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said in February.

    Still, in practice, moving toward vaguer guidance about interest rates could be a challenge for the Fed.

    Even when officials have in the past tried to move away from telegraphing their actions, they have found themselves drawn back to behaving in highly predictable ways.

    In winding down the bond-buying program known as quantitative easing in 2014, for example, the Fed said the pace of its actions would depend on the performance of the economy. Economic output varied sharply in 2014—contracting in the first quarter and then expanding at an annual rate near 5% in the middle of the year—but the Fed reduced its monthly bond purchases in steady increments.

    In December, some Fed officials wanted to eliminate rate guidance altogether. Instead, the central bank made a nuanced shift from an assurance rates would stay low for a “considerable time” to an assurance of patience before rates rise.

    Ms. Yellen said in December the patience promise meant the Fed was unlikely to raise rates at its subsequent two meetings. If the phrase appears in the statement Wednesday, it would rule out a rate increase at the next meetings in April and June. It is likely to be dropped because several officials have said they want to consider a June rate rise.

    Jeremy Stein, a Harvard University economics professor and former Fed governor, sees a conundrum brewing for officials. Even if the central bank says its actions will be less predictable, the market will infer a rate path from its actions.

    To avoid unsettling markets, he said, Fed officials have an incentive to stick to the path investors infer.

    “It is a hard thing to manage. You almost have to psyche yourself up to not worry too much about spooking the bond market,” he said.

    Donald Kohn, a Brookings Institution fellow and the Fed’s former vice chairman, noted that investors will still be getting plenty of clues from the Fed about the outlook, even after dropping the patience pledge.

    Fed officials’ quarterly economic forecasts include projections of interest rates in the future. Though not the official policy, these forecasts are an indication of what Fed officials themselves expect.

    Meantime, the Fed’s policy statement contains other hints that aren’t going away, including yet another reassurance that rates will remain below their longer-run averages “for some time.”

    “We’re not moving to a regime which is totally devoid of guidance,” Mr. Kohn said.
    bbjdog, rarsen, jxnb and 6 others like this.
    03-18-15 08:42 AM
  13. DaSchwantz's Avatar
    Morning gents...so, what's consensus on today's US interest rate guidance and how will market react?

    I think they will rise...and market will still go up. (for at least a bit...to scoop up all the weak hands shorting)

    Classically Posted.
    Imo they'll remove the word patient, telegraph for June, and may do some fx swaps. but will move slowly once started, with pauses. The eventual 'normal' fed rate will be 2-2.5% at most, once they're finished, and possibly even between 1.5. -2%.

    Posted via CB10
    bbjdog and Shanerredflag like this.
    03-18-15 08:58 AM
  14. DaSchwantz's Avatar
    He downgrades us with basic defamation, then goes on TV with a "...we think it will be big" comment about software earnings this ER.

    Huh?

    Thanks for the advice Mr. Agnostic.
    He is the best worst anaylist.
    His expression looked liked he was reading cue cards, or perhaps it was due to being beside Amber?
    He's no longer an analyst...

    Posted via CB10
    bungaboy and Bacon Munchers like this.
    03-18-15 09:00 AM
  15. bbjdog's Avatar
    Reading material

    When reading this article from WSJ, I could not help to think of Blackberry Passport and everything about Blackberry.
    But they still carried so many devices. Why?

    Hillary Clinton Balked at Two Devices? Try Toting Four, Five, Six... - WSJ
    03-18-15 09:09 AM
  16. BanffMoose's Avatar
    Reading material

    When reading this article from WSJ, I could not help to think of Blackberry Passport and everything about Blackberry.
    But they still carried so many devices. Why?

    Hillary Clinton Balked at Two Devices? Try Toting Four, Five, Six... - WSJ
    Although BlackBerries have had a 10 or 11 email address limit since the BBOS days, if you're on BES, you can only have one (1) BES email account on your phone at one time. So, if a politician had an email address for work, his/her campaign, and personal email account on the same BES server, then that politician would need three phones. If the email addresses were on different servers, they could use Exchange ActiveSync, but then the emails wouldn't be encrypted like BES. I don't think there is a way to set the "Reply To" field as another email address either, so the use of mailing list aliases isn't possible either. (Side note: I really wish BlackBerry worked to allow this.)

    As for the other countries, especially developing countries, carrying multiple phones was for carriers with the best signal. Hopefully use of the Paratek antenna would help there.

    For the ER, I hope John Chen starts talking about carrier uptake of the Movirtu platforms in developing countries and WorkLife in the developed countries.
    03-18-15 11:00 AM
  17. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    Head's up. Looks like the short interest on BlackBerry is now lower than mobile iron.
    03-18-15 12:24 PM
  18. BanffMoose's Avatar
    OT: Nintendo

    So, Nintendo announced yesterday that they would use the DeNA game platform to bring new Nintendo games to iOS and it's stock price jumped over 50% between yesterday and today. I sold out last year. Should've just held until the inevitable happened.

    I don't think Alec Saunders got DeNA on BlackBerry before he left did he?
    Mr BBRY, theRock1975 and CDM76 like this.
    03-18-15 12:49 PM
  19. bbjdog's Avatar
    Although BlackBerries have had a 10 or 11 email address limit since the BBOS days, if you're on BES, you can only have one (1) BES email account on your phone at one time. So, if a politician had an email address for work, his/her campaign, and personal email account on the same BES server, then that politician would need three phones. If the email addresses were on different servers, they could use Exchange ActiveSync, but then the emails wouldn't be encrypted like BES. I don't think there is a way to set the "Reply To" field as another email address either, so the use of mailing list aliases isn't possible either. (Side note: I really wish BlackBerry worked to allow this.)

    As for the other countries, especially developing countries, carrying multiple phones was for carriers with the best signal. Hopefully use of the Paratek antenna would help there.

    For the ER, I hope John Chen starts talking about carrier uptake of the Movirtu platforms in developing countries and WorkLife in the developed countries.
    How can I put this, sim card two numbers, personal and company, and so on.

    Everything those people complained or did, has been what Blackberry has been working on and performing a device they all asked for. So the question still remains why!

    Maybe one phone is for the lover's and the second phone is the guilty phone, and the third phone is the????. Lol

    I understand the connectivity portion of the article, but that's it.

    Work better!
    Soumaila Somtore likes this.
    03-18-15 01:04 PM
  20. BanffMoose's Avatar
    How can I put this, sim card two numbers, personal and company, and so on.

    Everything those people complained or did, has been what Blackberry has been working on and performing a device they all asked for. So the question still remains why!

    Maybe one phone is for the lover's and the second phone is the guilty phone, and the third phone is the????. Lol

    I understand the connectivity portion of the article, but that's it.

    Work better!
    BlackBerry is working on it but that's present tense. The entire Hilary "scandal" is past tense. . I don't think she was even using a BB10 phone was she?

    I think the US carriers are trying hard not to get in bed with BlackBerry again. At least as far as SAF-type revenue sharing arrangements. They're too greedy and would rather develop in house and let things flounder (like their ISIS/SoftCard(?)) mobile payment offering instead of using a readily available BlackBerry solution.

    But I am know to harbor conspiracy theories.
    La Emperor and 3MIKE like this.
    03-18-15 01:12 PM
  21. Munx's Avatar
    T-Mob making a push into business sector. Hopefully a BBRY partnership announcement coming.

    Posted via CB10
    03-18-15 01:31 PM
  22. masterful's Avatar
    Head's up. Looks like the short interest on BlackBerry is now lower than mobile iron.
    How can that be

    #BBFactCheck
    03-18-15 01:37 PM
  23. randall2580's Avatar
    T-Mob making a push into business sector. Hopefully a BBRY partnership announcement coming.

    Posted via CB10
    They are answering questions now, no mention at all about BlackBerry

    14:30 - now done, no mention at all of BlackBerry. Promotional plans now permanent, they will pay off all your fees to switch, some new plans starting at $16 per line.
    Last edited by randall2580; 03-18-15 at 02:31 PM.
    03-18-15 01:56 PM
  24. Corbu's Avatar
    FWIW:
    Could BlackBerry Ltd. (USA) Buy Sierra Wireless Inc. (USA)? | The Motley Fool Canada
    Last edited by Corbu; 03-18-15 at 03:17 PM. Reason: I should rather have said "FFT"... "Food for thought"!
    bbjdog, 3MIKE, lech31 and 10 others like this.
    03-18-15 02:52 PM
  25. rarsen's Avatar
    OT from the Related Technologies and Security files, as we wait for news of BBRY and more IoT:

    Tesla Gigafactory Archives | CleanTechnica

    http://gas2.org/2014/09/03/norway-ma...ev-incentives/
    Last edited by rarsen; 03-18-15 at 03:13 PM. Reason: Added info on Norway
    03-18-15 03:07 PM
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