View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

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1106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.66%
  • No

    413 37.34%
  1. Reed Richards's Avatar
    To echo others, on the one hand I completely understand if someone has deep skepticism regarding BlackBerry's future, but I am rather taken aback that 25% of the float is shorted, given the current share price.

    As a long, I see BlackBerry as having very interesting potential for several reasons, but I know the company will have to execute well in the face of obstacles and high hurdles to realize that potential. In fact, I sometimes think the more rational move would be to sit on the sidelines and wait and see how things shake out. Nevertheless, I own shares and calls.

    That said, while things need to break right for longs to truly succeed, can't the same now be said for shorts? Sure, the company could fail in its turnaround bid, but given the cash total, the MUCH-reduced operating costs, and the value of the patent portfolio/NOC/QNX, can revenues fall so quickly that shorts are well rewarded with a share price plunge? If not, why short at such high levels? Not to mention, you're not dealing with Heins and the old regime. John Chen and his colleagues have a track record of a turnaround at SAP. It's certainly possible BlackBerry's pivot never overcomes the obstacles and competition... but if BB does decline, it won't be because it's an inevitable outcome.

    Clearly I'm profiling the risk/reward and timeframe differently from the shorts, as probably most of you are. Anyone have insight into other cases of a company with similar strengths and weaknesses being shorted so heavily? It's fascinating, to say the least.
    12-13-14 07:17 PM
  2. early2bed's Avatar
    Shorts are in to make money.[/B] What's keeping them glued to BBRY stock?
    They obviously feel that BlackBerry is still a struggling smart phone maker in a field of technology giants - and that going retro and wide isn't going to help much. They believe that the service revenue is not that easy to come by as there is plenty of competition in that arena also. Because of the Canadian government, BlackBerry has fewer options to attract a buyer. They probably also don't believe that Blackberry has any particular advantage when it comes to the Internet of Things, either.
    12-13-14 08:03 PM
  3. bbjdog's Avatar
    Reading material


    This morning, I reiterated my belief that long-term stock returns from today's level will be lousy.

    This assumption is based in part on long-term valuation analysis and in part on my two-and-a-half decades of market experience, during which I have learned many searing lessons about how markets behave.

    As one reader was quick to point out, it is also "just a guess."

    By pointing that out, the reader reminded me of a profoundly important point about investing, one that many casual observers often don't fully understand.

    Every market outlook is "just a guess."

    Every one.

    Some guesses are more informed than others, of course. But no one knows the future. Everyone's just guessing.

    As a stock analyst in the 1990s, I assumed for many years that somewhere there was someone who knew what the market was going to do.

    Over the course of my career, I met ever more sophisticated and talented market players, including a handful of the most sophisticated investors and traders in the world.

    All of these folks were brilliant, confident, persuasive, and astoundingly well informed. They had made billions of dollars in the market. They had decades of experience. They knew everything it was legal to know, and often considerably more.

    And, as the future eventually made clear, not a single one of them knew what the market was going to do.

    It wasn't until I realized this firsthand that I fully "got it."

    No one knows what the market is going to do.

    We're all "just guessing."

    That realization was one of several that helped me develop the investing strategy I use today (indexing.) There is no question that this is the best strategy for me and almost every other investor. When you index, you save pots of money on fees and mistakes, the latter usually caused by the assumption that you or someone else knows what the market is going to do. And this pot of money that you save will help you achieve returns that are better than about 90% of other investors, especially after tax. And that's without any work or worry or heartache at all.

    Even if you don't yet understand why indexing wins, however, please at least understand this:

    No one knows what the market is going to do.

    Everyone's just guessing.
    This morning, I reiterated my belief that long-term stock returns from today's level will be lousy.

    This assumption is based in part on long-term valuation analysis and in part on my two-and-a-half decades of market experience, during which I have learned many searing lessons about how markets behave.

    As one reader was quick to point out, it is also "just a guess."

    By pointing that out, the reader reminded me of a profoundly important point about investing, one that many casual observers often don't fully understand.

    Every market outlook is "just a guess."

    Every one.

    Some guesses are more informed than others, of course. But no one knows the future. Everyone's just guessing.

    As a stock analyst in the 1990s, I assumed for many years that somewhere there was someone who knew what the market was going to do.

    Over the course of my career, I met ever more sophisticated and talented market players, including a handful of the most sophisticated investors and traders in the world.

    All of these folks were brilliant, confident, persuasive, and astoundingly well informed. They had made billions of dollars in the market. They had decades of experience. They knew everything it was legal to know, and often considerably more.

    And, as the future eventually made clear, not a single one of them knew what the market was going to do.

    It wasn't until I realized this firsthand that I fully "got it."

    No one knows what the market is going to do.

    We're all "just guessing."

    That realization was one of several that helped me develop the investing strategy I use today (indexing.) There is no question that this is the best strategy for me and almost every other investor. When you index, you save pots of money on fees and mistakes, the latter usually caused by the assumption that you or someone else knows what the market is going to do. And this pot of money that you save will help you achieve returns that are better than about 90% of other investors, especially after tax. And that's without any work or worry or heartache at all.

    Even if you don't yet understand why indexing wins, however, please at least understand this:

    No one knows what the market is going to do.

    Everyone's just guessing.


    Read more: Every Market Prediction Is 'Just A Guess' - Business Insider
    12-13-14 08:37 PM
  4. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    I don't understand one thing.

    Shorts are in to make money...
    So, if shorts are more experienced/savyier than rookie/newbie longs, why won't they just exit and take their money to another trade that is not so stagnant and has higher chance of bringing them favorable returns on investment? What's keeping them glued to BBRY stock?
    Someone correct me if I am wrong, but the prime mechanism here for the short interest is volatility with a strong dose of easy market manipulation.

    Anyone catching any Christmas shows lately?

    Oh yeah, and some news from the Christian Post!
    Who said that Christians were dumb!?

    http://m.christianpost.com/news/blac...riant--130950/
    bungaboy likes this.
    12-13-14 09:35 PM
  5. woofster's Avatar
    I've been short oil for a while now and I still have half my position...right now I am also short the S&P 500 and gold with smaller positions. I'd say the shorts on BBRY are all insane if they weren't some of the biggest hedge funds supported by Wall Street. I suspect at some point Chen is going to blow them all sky high, but the right moment is needed. For now, it means that those who have been targets of hedge funds before are now partners, including Prem Watsa and Patrick Soon Shiong.

    Posted via CB10
    I agree with the bolded statement above...and it's not because I think BBRY is going to soar come next week...it's simply because this is a $10 stock! Max profits is a measley $10/share if and only if the stock goes completely to zero. More realistically, even if the downside brings BBRY to $8...this short play will yield a paltry $2/share gain. If I'm shorting a stock, I'll short something like a Tesla (TSLA) or a Chipotle (CMG) or even a GoPro (GPRO) but certainly not a $10 stock. Everyone knows Radio Shack (RSH) is dead so I might as well just short RSH at its current 50 cents a share now while I'm at it, right? Sarcasm off. But I digress, that's just me and my 2 cents.
    Bacon Munchers and bungaboy like this.
    12-13-14 11:16 PM
  6. chrysaurora's Avatar
    I agree with the bolded statement above...and it's not because I think BBRY is going to soar come next week...it's simply because this is a $10 stock! Max profits is a measley $10/share if and only if the stock goes completely to zero. More realistically, even if the downside brings BBRY to $8...this short play will yield a paltry $2/share gain. If I'm shorting a stock, I'll short something like a Tesla (TSLA) or a Chipotle (CMG) or even a GoPro (GPRO) but certainly not a $10 stock. Everyone knows Radio Shack (RSH) is dead so I might as well just short RSH at its current 50 cents a share now while I'm at it, right? Sarcasm off. But I digress, that's just me and my 2 cents.
    Exactly my point. Even if BBRY doesn't succeed and end up being sold for peanuts (say, $6/share),
    1. there isn't much profit in that trade
    2. given BBRY's cash holding, assets BBRY can keep on fighting for another two years before dying and being sold for peanuts ($6/share). So, shorts have to wait 2 years to even make this paltry $4/share profit. Why not move to another stock that offers more potential in smaller timeframe?

    Why stay glued to BBRY?

    I guess one possible explanation is that they are stuck. If they exit their short positions, price goes up and they start to hurt. So, they can't basically exit without raising the price and hurting themselves. So, they just need to sit tight and hope either BBRY goes bankrupt, sold for peanuts so that they don't have to exit their positions?
    12-13-14 11:45 PM
  7. bbjdog's Avatar
    Is it shorts, who are causing this price drop in Blackberry or is it stock manipulation?

    Market manipulation is a deliberate attempt to interfere with the free and fair operation of the market and create artificial, false or misleading appearances with respect to the price of, or market for, a security, commodity or currency. Market manipulation is prohibited in most countries, in particular, it is prohibited in the United States under Section 9(a)(2)[1] of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, in Australia under Section 1041A of the Corporations Act 2001, and in Israel under Section 54(a) of the securities act of 1968. The Act defines market manipulation as transactions which create an artificial price or maintain an artificial price for a tradeable security. Market manipulation is also prohibited for wholesale electricity markets under Section 222 of the Federal Power Act[2] and wholesale natural gas markets under Section 4A of the Natural Gas Act.[3]

    Examples[edit]
    Pools: "Agreements, often written, among a group of traders to delegate authority to a single manager to trade in a specific stock for a specific period of time and then to share in the resulting profits or losses."[4]
    Churning: "When a trader places both buy and sell orders at about the same price. The increase in activity is intended to attract additional investors, and increase the price."
    Stock Bashing: "This scheme is usually orchestrated by savvy online message board posters (a.k.a. "Bashers") who make up false and/or misleading information about the target company in an attempt to get shares for a cheaper price. This activity, in most cases, is conducted by posting libelous posts on multiple public forums. The perpetrators sometimes work directly for unscrupulous Investor Relations firms who have convertible notes that convert for more shares the lower the bid or ask price is; thus the lower these Bashers can drive a stock price down by trying to convince shareholders they have bought a worthless security, the more shares the Investor Relations firm receives as compensation. Immediately after the stock conversion is complete and shares are issued to the Investor Relations firm, consultant, attorney or similar party, the basher/s then become friends of the company and move quickly to ensure they profit on a classic Pump & Dump scheme to liquidate their ill gotten shares. (see P&D)"
    Pump and dump: "This scheme is generally part of a more complex grand plan of market manipulation on the targeted security. The Perpetrators (Usually stock promoters) convince company affiliates and large position non-affiliates to release shares into a free trading status as "Payment" for services for promoting the security. Instead of putting out legitimate information about a company the promoter sends out bogus e-mails (the "Pump") to millions of unsophisticated investors (Sometimes called "Retail Investors") in an attempt to drive the price of the stock and volume to higher points. After they accomplish both, the promoter sells their shares (the "Dump") and the stock price falls like a stone, taking all the duped investors money with it."
    Runs: "When a group of traders create activity or rumors in order to drive the price of a security up." An example is the Guinness share-trading fraud of the 1980s. In the US, this activity is usually referred to as painting the tape.[5] Runs may also occur when trader(s) are attempting to drive the price of a certain share down, although this is rare. (see Stock Bashing)"
    Ramping (the market): "Actions designed to artificially raise the market price of listed securities and to give the impression of voluminous trading, in order to make a quick profit."[6]
    Wash trade: "Selling and repurchasing the same or substantially the same security for the purpose of generating activity and increasing the price".
    Bear raid: "Attempting to push the price of a stock down by heavy selling or short selling."[7]
    Lure and Squeeze: The way it works is a company is very distressed on paper, with impossibly high debt and consistently high annual losses, but very few assets, making it look as if bankruptcy must be imminent. The stock price gradually falls as people new to the stock short it on the basis of the poor outlook for the company, until the number of shorted shares greatly exceeds the total number of shares that are not held by those aware of the lure and squeeze scheme (call them "people in the know"). In the meantime, people in the know increasingly purchase the stock as it drops to lower and lower prices. When the short interest has reached a maximum, the company announces it has made a deal with its creditors to settle its loans in exchange for shares of stock (or some similar kind of arrangement that leverages the stock price to benefit the company), knowing that those who have short positions will be squeezed as the price of the stock sky-rockets. Near its peak price, people in the know start to sell, and the price gradually falls back down again for the cycle to repeat.
    Quote stuffing is a tactic employed by high-frequency traders that involves quickly entering and withdrawing large orders in an attempt to flood the market, thereby gaining an advantage over slower market participants.[8]

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Last edited by bbjdog; 12-14-14 at 11:55 AM.
    CDM76, bungaboy, rarsen and 5 others like this.
    12-14-14 12:22 AM
  8. Corbu's Avatar
    ?They need another hit': BlackBerry Ltd seeks return to its roots with upcoming Classic smartphone launch | Financial Post

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-blackberry_ltd-classic-launch.jpg

    BlackBerry Ltd. is taking a page from its past with its new Classic smartphone, which resurrects popular features from the devices of its glory days in the hopes of reconnecting with its base of corporate users.

    The Waterloo, Ont.-based technology company’s newest smartphone — set to launch in New York, Singapore and Frankfurt on Wednesday — is equipped with a trackpad, the familiar row of navigation keys, and a QWERTY keypad.

    Chief executive and chairman John Chen has said that he expects the Classic to be more popular than BlackBerry’s recently launched phablet-sized device, the Passport.

    Ultimately, to shore up confidence with investors, BlackBerry needs just one of these two new devices to succeed, said Brian Colello, equity analyst at Morningstar Securities in Chicago.

    “One of these devices, the Passport or the Classic — and maybe it will be the Classic — needs to emerge as that front-end device that is in the customers’ hands. And, reputationally they need another hit, they need another successful phone at some point.”

    The launch of the Classic is the latest step in Mr. Chen’s turnaround plan for the technology company since taking the top job last November. Since then, he has repositioned the company to focus on software, services and enterprise clients, rather than the smartphone category which BlackBerry pioneered, as it seeks to attain profitability by next fiscal year.

    BlackBerry aims to double its software revenue to $500 million and generate $100 million in revenue from its BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) by next fiscal year.

    However, it needs revenue from devices, such as the Classic, to provide short-term profits through the transition period — particularly as the high-margin service revenue it enjoyed from its older devices drops between 10% and 15% each quarter.

    BlackBerry needs to sell 10 million smartphones annually to be profitable on hardware, Mr. Chen has said.

    While the square-screened Passport device launched in September was in the works before Mr. Chen took the helm of the company, he says the Classic is the result of feedback he received from customers.

    “It’s tempting in a rapidly changing, rapidly growing mobile market to change for the sake of change… But there’s also something to be said for the classic adage, if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” Mr. Chen wrote about the Classic in a post on BlackBerry’s official blog in October.

    He said the Classic’s screen will be bigger and sharper than in some of its previous devices, and its app catalogue is “growing.”

    The Classic is already available for pre-order from BlackBerry for $499, which is sold out, according to its website. Pre-orders are also available at Best Buy, Future Shop and Rogers Wireless.

    While more details about the device are expected to be unveiled on Wednesday, investors will also be watching quarterly earnings results due out Friday for an in-depth gauge of the company’s health.

    During the last quarter, ended Aug. 30, BlackBerry reported a narrower loss than analysts expected, but revenue fell short of the consensus.

    The latest quarter, ended Nov. 29, is the first to reflect sales of the Passport.

    Tim Long, analyst at BMO Capital Markets in New York, is expecting BlackBerry to report a quarterly loss of US8 on US$875 million in revenue.

    “We believe better Passport volumes will be offset by flagging legacy sales,” he said in a note to clients on Thursday.

    Mr. Long also expects BlackBerry’s quarterly smartphone shipments to remain flat, compared to the previous quarter, at 2.1 million units.

    “We believe the Street is more optimistic about the Passport and the upcoming Classic, which are targeted at enterprise users,” he said in the note. “However, we believe that competition from Android and iOS may limit upside in developed markets.”
    bbjdog, rarsen, jxnb and 4 others like this.
    12-14-14 08:10 AM
  9. BBhombre's Avatar
    Why is it so difficult to understand a short's reason to short this stock? For example: The stock is down 20% in 4 weeks since the Samsung Pump n dump. That is huge gains annualized Even a $10 stock that drops to $8 offers huge gains for a short. Percentage gains repeated over and over is the name of the game in swing trading. Plus with the volatility of this stock, the high liquidity of this stock it makes an excellent vehicle for short and long swing traders. The algo traders don't care if it goes up or down as they front run the orders to to scalp profits on both the long and short side. Until the company shows concrete revenue growth by selling something that earns a profit it will continue to be a pump n dump stock for long and shorts and not an investment.
    12-14-14 08:24 AM
  10. bungaboy's Avatar
    Why is it so difficult to understand a short's reason to short this stock? For example: The stock is down 20% in 4 weeks since the Samsung Pump n dump. That is huge gains annualized Even a $10 stock that drops to $8 offers huge gains for a short. Percentage gains repeated over and over is the name of the game in swing trading. Plus with the volatility of this stock, the high liquidity of this stock it makes an excellent vehicle for short and long swing traders. The algo traders don't care if it goes up or down as they front run the orders to to scalp profits on both the long and short side. Until the company shows concrete revenue growth by selling something that earns a profit it will continue to be a pump n dump stock for long and shorts and not an investment.
    Reality in the near term.
    bbjdog likes this.
    12-14-14 09:11 AM
  11. bungaboy's Avatar
    Where have I seen this? Hmmm. . . .

    "Stock Bashing: "This scheme is usually orchestrated by savvy online message board posters (a.k.a. "Bashers") who make up false and/or misleading information about the target company in an attempt to get shares for a cheaper price. This activity, in most cases, is conducted by posting libelous posts on multiple public forums. The perpetrators sometimes work directly for unscrupulous Investor Relations firms who have convertible notes that convert for more shares the lower the bid or ask price is; thus the lower these Bashers can drive a stock price down by trying to convince shareholders they have bought a worthless security, the more shares the Investor Relations firm receives as compensation. Immediately after the stock conversion is complete and shares are issued to the Investor Relations firm, consultant, attorney or similar party, the basher/s then become friends of the company and move quickly to ensure they profit on a classic Pump & Dump scheme to liquidate their ill gotten shares. (see P&D)"

    Pump and dump: "This scheme is generally part of a more complex grand plan of market manipulation on the targeted security. The Perpetrators (Usually stock promoters) convince company affiliates and large position non-affiliates to release shares into a free trading status as "Payment" for services for promoting the security. Instead of putting out legitimate information about a company the promoter sends out bogus e-mails (the "Pump") to millions of unsophisticated investors (Sometimes called "Retail Investors") in an attempt to drive the price of the stock and volume to higher points. After they accomplish both, the promoter sells their shares (the "Dump") and the stock price falls like a stone, taking all the duped investors money with it."
    12-14-14 09:13 AM
  12. DaSchwantz's Avatar
    Regarding shorts and BBRY, Prem Watsa played a key role in getting SAC Capital (one of the biggest hedge funds on the planet and a major BBRY short) criminally convicted of firmwide insider trading. I think there is more than just money at stake here, but ultimately that is also why the upside is also so large. I do think there are major short interests that are overly fixated on destroying BlackBerry, but I also think that you are right about the pile on that happens due to algo trading at stock price turns. If you can't beat em join em.

    Posted via CB10
    12-14-14 09:18 AM
  13. bbjdog's Avatar
    Glad to see that stock manipulation is alive and well. I have been an investor for a long time (that sounds funny, like a part of a movie, "five dollars I love you long time " or something like that) and I have learned from the market. I don't have control of the market and what they do, but I will leave it in GOD'S hands!

    Bungaboy, I know you're going to comeback with a good one!

    Posted via CB10
    Shanerredflag and bungaboy like this.
    12-14-14 09:59 AM
  14. Highlander01's Avatar
    "Will keyboard-lovers give BlackBerry Classic a chance?" Interesting article by the newspaper and comments from the readers. I cannot post the link, I need 10 posts. Regardless, the article can be found on today's Globe and Mail. Perhaps someone else can post the website link.
    12-14-14 10:29 AM
  15. early2bed's Avatar
    Lots of interesting info from former insiders. Chen killed all of the products in development except for the Passport because it was too far along?

    John Chen is about to put in place the last piece of his turnaround plan for BlackBerry Ltd. by doing something almost unheard of in the smartphone business, or the tech industry in general: launching a flagship product with old features the company previously abandoned in the name of progress.

    On Wednesday, the chief executive officer of the Waterloo, Ont.-based company will unveil the Classic, a smartphone aimed at its most die-hard, change-averse customers: executives and other keyboard-dependent “power users” who have held on to their aging BlackBerry Bold phones rather than upgrade to the company’s newer touchscreen products. Mr. Chen will make the point by unveiling the Classic in the museum-like Italian neo-Renaissance-style surroundings of Cipriani, a restaurant in New York’s financial district with painted ceilings and marble columns.

    ...

    In an open letter this fall, Mr. Chen said he was guided by the adage, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” and recently told reporters: “I’ve spoken to a lot of people and they want it; a lot of people say ‘I am waiting for this.’”

    But is the Classic the right product to bring BlackBerry back to the smartphone fore? Or will it calcify the company’s reputation as a has-been and herald its exit from making phones altogether? Even insiders aren’t sure.

    “A small subset [of users] will be pleased, but the overall market has completely moved past what this product will offer,” said one former senior executive who worked under Mr. Chen. “This is a short-term capitalization play: They can meet [pent-up] demand and probably make some money off it. … But my overall thesis is that BlackBerry will be out of handsets at some point.”

    ...

    “It was such a foreign experience, [long-time users] literally threw up onto it,” one former senior insider quipped. Insiders say the company has sold fewer than seven million BlackBerry 10 devices to end users; at its peak four years ago, it shipped nearly twice as many smartphones in one quarter.

    Weeks after the BlackBerry 10 launch, U.S. wireless giant Verizon gave the company a list of seven items it suggested should be changed immediately to make the devices more appealing, one former senior insider said. That included restoring the “back” button. BlackBerry’s software engineers felt it was no longer needed because of touchscreen functions, but carriers and customers wanted it back. “Verizon got real pointed with us,” the insider said. “They stripped us down.”

    ...

    Mr. Chen killed every other product in development except Passport (a product he initially didn’t like but which was well advanced in development) soon after his arrival and directed his engineers to deliver the Classic as soon as possible. Developers initially struggled to meet his demanding timeline. Early models were “so ugly, like a child’s flip-flop” sandal with a big rounded top, one insider said. The Classic is now rectangular and a bit taller than the 4.7 inch-long Q10. Meanwhile, developers had to write a lot of code on top of the new touch-oriented operating system to ensure the physical buttons functioned properly.
    Will keyboard-lovers give BlackBerry Classic a chance? - The Globe and Mail
    Last edited by early2bed; 12-14-14 at 10:52 AM.
    12-14-14 10:33 AM
  16. StormieTwo's Avatar
    12-14-14 10:33 AM
  17. Highlander01's Avatar
    Yes, thanks that is the Globe and Mail website link re "Will keyboard-lovers give BlackBerry Classic a chance?" Interesting article by the newspaper and comments from the readers. I look forward to the comments from others in this forum. All the best for a great day / week.
    12-14-14 10:42 AM
  18. bspence87's Avatar
    Why is it so difficult to understand a short's reason to short this stock? For example: The stock is down 20% in 4 weeks since the Samsung Pump n dump. That is huge gains annualized Even a $10 stock that drops to $8 offers huge gains for a short. Percentage gains repeated over and over is the name of the game in swing trading. Plus with the volatility of this stock, the high liquidity of this stock it makes an excellent vehicle for short and long swing traders. The algo traders don't care if it goes up or down as they front run the orders to to scalp profits on both the long and short side. Until the company shows concrete revenue growth by selling something that earns a profit it will continue to be a pump n dump stock for long and shorts and not an investment.
    I think the issue here is that the upside potential for the stock is much larger than the downside. The maximum you will make off of the stock by shorting, is about 40%. Maybe more if you strategically time it.

    The maximum upside is...? Limitless?

    Posted via CB10
    bungaboy and bbjdog like this.
    12-14-14 10:46 AM
  19. helopilot06's Avatar
    I think the issue here is that the upside potential for the stock is much larger than the downside. The maximum you will make off of the stock by shorting, is about 40%. Maybe more if you strategically time it.

    The maximum upside is...? Limitless?

    Posted via CB10
    Limitless if and ONLY If the company delivers profits consistently for consecutive quarters. Though the company is now healthier than it has been in a long time there is still a lot of ground to be made up and a lot of on the books proof that there is sustainable growth to be had. We all know that the business strategy is very feasible and although sentiment is turning there's still a lot of resistance from companies to upgrade devices and join BES12, ie my company that's still using the bold.

    Posted via crackberry10 on my new Z30!
    12-14-14 11:06 AM
  20. bbjdog's Avatar
    Yes, thanks that is the Globe and Mail website link re "Will keyboard-lovers give BlackBerry Classic a chance?" Interesting article by the newspaper and comments from the readers. I look forward to the comments from others in this forum. All the best for a great day / week.
    The title of the article should be changed to "How the globe and Mail keep going back to the past"!

    Posted via CB10
    12-14-14 11:06 AM
  21. early2bed's Avatar
    I think the issue here is that the upside potential for the stock is much larger than the downside. The maximum you will make off of the stock by shorting, is about 40%. Maybe more if you strategically time it.

    The maximum upside is...? Limitless?
    The simplest explanation for increased short interest is that some think that Blackberrys earnings report will cause the stock to go down some. The maximum upside is technically limitless but practically limited. This is not a stock that will suddenly double in price unless companies like Apple, Google, or Microsoft get into a bidding war to purchase it.

    Neither the Passport nor the Classic are viewed as being sufficiently attractive to new customers to do anything other than slow down market share declines. Other areas of potential growth are pretty speculative at best.

    Simply put, there isn't a whole lot for the shorts to be afraid of with this company. The downside for the company is well-known and the upside is pretty limited.
    Last edited by early2bed; 12-14-14 at 12:18 PM.
    laketrout73 likes this.
    12-14-14 11:07 AM
  22. bbjdog's Avatar
    Limitless if and ONLY If the company delivers profits consistently for consecutive quarters. Though the company is now healthier than it has been in a long time there is still a lot of ground to be made up and a lot of on the books proof that there is sustainable growth to be had. We all know that the business strategy is very feasible and although sentiment is turning there's still a lot of resistance from companies to upgrade devices and join BES12, ie my company that's still using the bold.

    Posted via crackberry10 on my new Z30!
    Hey maybe your company will upgrade to the classic, but I don't see them upgrading any time soon. I'm starting to believe that corporation are cheaper than consumers. A big corporation in Canada did not upgrade until the Z10 had dropped big time in price. Then I see all their staff walking around with a Z10, which by the way was already outdated at that time.

    Posted via CB10
    12-14-14 11:13 AM
  23. bspence87's Avatar
    Limitless if and ONLY If the company delivers profits consistently for consecutive quarters. Though the company is now healthier than it has been in a long time there is still a lot of ground to be made up and a lot of on the books proof that there is sustainable growth to be had. We all know that the business strategy is very feasible and although sentiment is turning there's still a lot of resistance from companies to upgrade devices and join BES12, ie my company that's still using the bold.

    Posted via crackberry10 on my new Z30!
    Yes, for sure. But there is a possibility there.
    The company will never go below $6 though, because even a liquidation would yield that.
    Hence, unlimited and extremely possible upside (who knows how far MDM and IoT go), but a very limited downside, especially with positive uptake for software offerings, which is a very realistic possibility for this ER.

    I think most shorts are still betting on handset sales.

    Posted via CB10
    bbjdog and bungaboy like this.
    12-14-14 11:45 AM
  24. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    I don't understand one thing.

    Shorts are in to make money. They make money if BBRY starts to go towards $ ZERO. But stock has been pretty much stagnant for a while. It's neither going down to zero nor shooting for the stars. It flutters every now and then but then settles down to same ol levels. So, why wouldn't shorts just exit the trade?

    Do they have BALLS of steel (like us longs) too?! Wouldn't they get bored of this trade where their money has been stuck, take it out and invest it elsewhere?

    I personally believe, even newbies (like myself) know the basic - buy low, sell high. But shorting is somewhat counterintutive and therefore short traders must have atleast some base line level of investment savyiness or experience. I mean, even a rookie can play long trades but playing short trades require more knowledge/experience.

    So, if shorts are more experienced/savyier than rookie/newbie longs, why won't they just exit and take their money to another trade that is not so stagnant and has higher chance of bringing them favorable returns on investment? What's keeping them glued to BBRY stock?
    I would be extremely surprised they don't have some "set it and forget it" just like us ... but not in the same proportions.
    The swing on this SP is such incredible ...

    "Our rookie/long" deadline is september 2016 (based on OP date, I mistakely often described as February - date format error - sorry). By then we will see how thing goes, given our goal, which was a tiny investment and no in/out trades.

    Have a nice Sunday guys and thanks for all the inputs !
    Cheers
    SF
    bbjdog, bungaboy, Mr BBRY and 2 others like this.
    12-14-14 11:58 AM
  25. 3MIKE's Avatar
    Thank you guys this a great thread to read !!

    Z10 catch and release !!
    12-14-14 12:15 PM
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