View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

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  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.77%
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  1. Corbu's Avatar
    Backgrounder on Silent Circle:
    As mobile device privacy hits the spotlight, Silent Circle zips ahead - The Washington Post

    Reading this and the previous piece with its information from Gartner, I can't help but wonder if BlackBerry would have such a hard time if it were an american company...
    10-12-14 06:27 PM
  2. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Backgrounder on Silent Circle:
    As mobile device privacy hits the spotlight, Silent Circle zips ahead - The Washington Post

    Reading this and the previous piece with its information from Gartner, I can't help but wonder if BlackBerry would have such a hard time if it were an american company...
    I've come to the conclusion that it's not really "journalism" any more...just regurgitated speaking notes from press releases. Lazy comes to mind too.

    Passport'n stuff all day long.
    sidhuk, Corbu, theRock1975 and 4 others like this.
    10-12-14 07:17 PM
  3. sidhuk's Avatar
    Backgrounder on Silent Circle:
    As mobile device privacy hits the spotlight, Silent Circle zips ahead - The Washington Post

    Reading this and the previous piece with its information from Gartner, I can't help but wonder if BlackBerry would have such a hard time if it were an american company...
    Totally agree with you. But after using this passport for more than couple of weeks, IMO passport will hold it's own. It does have the ingredients to keep people on board in long haul. One step at a time. First step was survival and that is behind now.
    JC said 8 quarters. And he is well ahead of schedule. Passport has shaved at least another quarter or two. Still need to get rid of the organized shorts.

    Posted using BlackBerry passport.
    10-12-14 07:29 PM
  4. CDM76's Avatar
    Frustrating...they closed a couple of them but he's clearly stirring/looking for a fight...not to mention lying. Wish some folks would grow a set...just sayin.

    Passport'n stuff all day long.
    Wish the admins would delete these pieces of trash and their posts. Makes the site and bb product look bad


    Posted via CB10
    10-12-14 09:19 PM
  5. Corbu's Avatar
    Another very positive review from India.
    BlackBerry Passport Review: The QWERTY Challenger | NDTV Gadgets

    Verdict

    Overall, we love BlackBerry's innovative streak here. This phone has one of the most distinct and unique personalities of any we've tested so far this year. It's the product of a lot of smart thinking and we have to give BlackBerry credit for investing in its idea and crafting such a high-end product even when the company itself is down. We doubted, in our review of the recently launched Z3 (Review | Photos), whether that phone would be enough to turn the company around. It wasn't, but the Passport might very well be - especially if there's more stuff like it coming.

    We think BlackBerry is really on to something here. It is targeting working professionals with specific needs beyond just being constantly in touch, such as doctors, architects and lawyers. People in these fields are most likely familiar with BlackBerry devices already, and could easily be willing to carry a second if not third phone around. It's also no coincidence that they tend to be high-net-worth individuals.

    Large, awkward phablets are already popular so there's little worry about the shape and size being a turn-off. There's only the question of whether people will be willing to give BlackBerry a try. Devices such as the Z10 and Z3 simply don't have what it takes to stand out in a crowd of Android phones, but the Passport is new and different, and has very easily understandable benefits to offer. After many, many long years, BlackBerry might finally have done something completely right.
    10-13-14 12:19 AM
  6. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    You're thinking too short term. Maybe once they are a major player again, but right now they shouldn't sell their major competitive advantage.

    If ios and android had same encryption as BlackBerry what would encourage govs and major corps, worried about security, to stay with BlackBerry????

    Posted via CB10
    ... they still need a back-end system (BES) to handle it.
    And IF they go with BlackBerry encryption, chances are they're actually giving up on this part (greatest news we could ear).
    Chen made it clear : business is in services, SAAS if you prefer shortcuts. In clear, he doesn't care if other manufacturers sell 10X more than BlackBerry, provided a limited amount of highly targeted devices is enough for BlackBerry to earn pennies, while they pile massive cash with huge margings based on services.
    That's the way it is now and I believe for - say - the 5 next years. Won't please Joes ... probably.
    Last edited by Superfly_FR; 10-13-14 at 06:13 AM.
    rarsen, jxnb, bungaboy and 5 others like this.
    10-13-14 06:03 AM
  7. bungaboy's Avatar
    OT: Morning has broken . . .

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-img_20141013_073752_hdr.jpg

    Morning has broken like the first morning
    Blackbird has spoken like the first bird
    Praise for the singing, praise for the morning
    Praise for them springing fresh from the Word

    Sweet the rains new fall, sunlit from Heaven
    Like the first dewfall on the first grass
    Praise for the sweetness of the wet garden
    Sprung in completeness where His feet pass

    Mine is the sunlight, mine is the morning
    Born of the one light, Eden saw play
    Praise with elation, praise every morning
    God's recreation of the new day

    Morning has broken like the first morning
    Blackbird has spoken like the first bird
    Praise for the singing, praise for the morning
    Praise for them springing fresh from the Word
    10-13-14 07:55 AM
  8. Corbu's Avatar
    Executive Column: BlackBerry to renew focus on enterprise market | The Jakarta Post

    Canadian smartphone maker BlackBerry has been struggling to turn its cash flow to neutral or positive and aims to regain its market share, which has been eroded by rivals iOS and Android-based devices. During a recent visit to Indonesia, BlackBerry’s president for global enterprise solutions, John Sims, spoke to The Jakarta Post’s Khoirul Amin about his company’s strategy to achieve its aim by focusing on the enterprise market. Below is an excerpt from the interview:

    Question: How pivotal is the enterprise market for BlackBerry?

    Answer: I have an analogy. If you are walking downstairs and you stumble, you grab for the handrail to stabilize yourself.

    In the case of BlackBerry, with the troubles the company had over the last couple of years before John Chen took over, that was our stumble. The handrail is the focus on enterprise.

    So, when you have stumbled, you have to bring your focus back, and the focus for us is the enterprise market, the professional consumer market and the middle consumer market. We have been spending a lot more time on our customers, listening to them and understanding what their challenges are and then formulating how we can help them solve their problems.

    I can tell you from the company’s point of view that the enterprise business is one of the primary and key focus areas for the company as we take it through a transformation. It is one of the key areas that we are looking at as we work to grow the company’s revenues over the next couple years and beyond.

    If you look at BlackBerry’s presence in the enterprise market, if you look at our global customer base, you can add up three competitors combined and they do not match our size.

    So, we are by far the number one player in managing enterprise mobility for our customers, particularly customers in what we call the regulated industry; those who care a lot about security, privacy and so on.

    So, that is one of the primary areas where we will find success.

    Which enterprise sector in the country has been the largest revenue contributor for BlackBerry?

    I think it is true globally and it is true in individual markets like Indonesia. The focus, first of all, is we have very close partnerships with mobile operators. They are important customers and a channel for us to the market, so we work with them.

    But then, working with financial services companies would probably be one of the largest segments that we would address […] and then beyond that, other regulated industries and the government as well.

    If you look globally at BlackBerry, our largest industry is government, where globally we still have a very strong presence within governments, financial services, health care, energy companies, and manufacturing companies.

    Globally, we have more than 70,000 enterprises using our BlackBerry enterprise server, which is the most used of any of our enterprise products. And those [the enterprises] tend to be major corporations — generally large companies.

    How will BlackBerry tap deeper into Indonesia’s enterprise market?

    Our strategy is to continue to expand the capability of our best server, our BlackBerry enterprise server. For example, we have a new release that is coming out in November, and in addition to supporting iOS and Android, BlackBerry will also support Windows Phone.

    So, we are expanding the number of platforms for varied use, we are expanding capability, we are making it a much more scalable platform. We are also enabling it to be used in the cloud as well as on premises […] we call them value-added services, additional enterprise-focused, value-added services.

    For example, with BlackBerry Messenger [BBM], we have taken BBM and we have created a version specifically for enterprises, called BBM Protected. We launched that in June and then we expanded it in August, and we will expand it again before the end of the year. BBM Protected allows secure chat inside the enterprise and it allows those chats to be locked.

    We will [also] soon be launching something called BBM Meetings. It is a service that allows voice and video conferences for groups of about 25 people.

    It will initially be launched as an enterprise service this year and we will also expand it to the consumer market sometime next year […] It will have a presence on BlackBerry devices, iOS and Android. It will be on tablets and we will also have a desktop version.


    Nowadays, a lot of companies implement a ‘bring your own device [BYOD]’ policy for their employees to follow. In some cases, they opt for non-BlackBerry devices. How does your company deal with this issue?

    The BlackBerry device is one of the best devices for multiple usage: for corporate and personal use. It can be used either for personal purposes or corporate work. The company allows its employees to have the freedom to use the device for personal purposes or work. We call that the ‘cop’ model.

    BlackBerry devices are ideal for that [‘cop’ model]. With BlackBerry’s balance, we have the ability to split a device into the work perimeter and the personal perimeter.

    We also support that for iOS and Android devices as well, through an offering we call ‘secure work space’.

    Secure work space allows us to create a secure perimeter on iOS and Android devices, and we enable corporate use inside the secure perimeter, while the device can also be used for personal purposes outside the secure perimeter.

    And the BlackBerry enterprise server, which is a key piece of technology that is installed in a large number of enterprises globally, allows companies to manage those devices, to make sure which applications can be run on the corporate sites, how data is managed on the corporate site, how a typo is planned and so on.

    So, we are doing a lot to enable BYOD, but we also see a lot of customers who want to retain the use of so-called ‘cop’ devices, corporate-issued devices, but that allow for personal use as well.

    Does BlackBerry have any specific focus to help it stand out among competitors in the country’s enterprise market?

    I will tell you that there is a very strong demand for keyboard-based technology from BlackBerry, and we have already announced — in the enterprise business in particular — there are two more devices coming this year: the Passport [recently launched in London, UK], which is a larger-size tablet, and the Classic.

    The BlackBerry Classic will arrive here by the end of the year, and both of them are QWERTY keyboard devices.

    So, I think we have also been quite clear that we see the keyboard as one of BlackBerry’s key differentials. It is not that we won’t launch touchscreen devices; we have of course with the Z3, which was launched here [in Indonesia], and combination [keyboard-touchscreen devices], but the keyboard will feature prominently in the future. We are clear on that.
    Last edited by Corbu; 10-13-14 at 11:51 AM.
    cjcampbell, W Hoa, jxnb and 11 others like this.
    10-13-14 08:05 AM
  9. CDM76's Avatar
    ... they still need a back-end system (BES) to handle it.
    And IF they go with BlackBerry encryption, chances are they're actually giving up on this part (greatest news we could ear).
    Chen made it clear : business is in services, SAAS if you prefer shortcuts. In clear, he doesn't care if other manufacturers sell 10X more than BlackBerry, provided a limited amount of highly targeted devices is enough for BlackBerry to earn pennies, while they pile massive cash with huge margings based on services.
    That's the way it is now and I believe for - say - the 5 next years. Won't please Joes ... probably.
    Maybe so, but I still don't see the longterm benefits of giving away one of their core strategic benefits

    Posted via CB10
    10-13-14 08:51 AM
  10. sidhuk's Avatar
    10-13-14 09:29 AM
  11. sidhuk's Avatar
    http://www.zdnet.com/blackberry-pass...or-7000034571/

    Wow. Some one has the guts and admitted that BlackBerry has proven him wrong. Great review.
    Posted using BlackBerry passport.


    Posted using BlackBerry passport.
    10-13-14 09:46 AM
  12. FijiBB's Avatar
    Anyone knows when PP will be available (more or less) in amazon.co.uk?
    10-13-14 10:00 AM
  13. Variante Alta's Avatar
    Now that's the kind of review the Passport deserves - not for everyone but awesome at what it's intended for...thanks for the link.

    Posted via CB10
    10-13-14 10:03 AM
  14. Mr BBRY's Avatar
    The markets appear to be rebounding after yet again another selloff. BBRY stayed above $9 as the Nasdaq dropped about 1.25%. Great!

    HALO dropped below $8, so I greedily placed a limit order at $7.95, which triggered it to turn on a dime and bounce as soon as it touched $7.96. Figures! Some people must be making some serious money as this market continues to be played like a fiddle! Crazy stuff!
    10-13-14 11:08 AM
  15. sidhuk's Avatar
    http://www.engadget.com/2014/10/13/a...=rss_truncated
    "GT, however, has petitioned a New Hampshire district court to help declare Apple's "oppressive" non-disclosure agreement to be null and void, saving it from the penalty and helping it to convince buyers that it's worth picking up the valuable sapphire crystal production hardware. Of course, the knock-on effect is that the company will then be able to reveal what Apple was planning to do with the technology, "


    Posted using BlackBerry passport.
    10-13-14 11:41 AM
  16. Corbu's Avatar
    BlackBerry positions itself as a global player in the mobile health (mHealth) market

    BlackBerry, the Canadian telecommunication and wireless equipment company, is reported to be considering a move into the mobile health market in India with the launch of a connected healthcare service platform.

    The product launch will be carried out in partnership with the US-based health technology company NantHealth.

    The news follows the announcement earlier this year by QNX Software Systems, a subsidiary of BlackBerry, of a new release of QNX OS for Medical 1.1, a software platform for safety-critical environments.

    Although the move has been confirmed by BlackBerry, no official launch date has yet been confirmed. In an interview with India's Economic Times, Sunil Lalvani, head of BlackBerry India, said that BlackBerry is "running trials with multiple hospitals in India."

    He also said that the product "includes integration with different hospital information systems as well as various medical equipment."

    BlackBerry, formerly known as Research In Motion, previously dominated the mobile handset market. However, the company lost significant market share after underestimating the challenge being mounted by Apple and Samsung.

    After a change of management, the company's new strategy of positioning itself as a player in the "Internet of Things" market seems to be paying off. In late September it reported a solid second quarter. This in turn boosted BlackBerry shares which have rallied 75 per cent since December 2013.

    BlackBerry's cash flow deficit was just $36 million in the second quarter. A number of industry analysts have reported that the company's chief executive John Chen may well deliver on his two key promises: to break-even cash flow by the end of this year, and to bring the company to profitability by 2016.

    The key challenge for BlackBerry's management is that the company's hardware has been struggling to maintain relevance in today's market.

    In the past, BlackBerry's profitability came from service fees paid for use of the secure BlackBerry Enterprise Server. Today service revenues are falling 15 per cent every passing quarter.

    On the other hand, BlackBerry's operating system QNX currently dominates the automobile entertainment systems segment, with 53% market share.

    In addition, the company recently released the IEC 62304-compliant QNX "OS for Medical" version 1.1, which helps manufacturers to cut costs in developing blood analysis systems, infusion pumps, robotic surgical instruments, patient monitoring systems, and other safety-critical medical devices.
    sidhuk, bungaboy, CDM76 and 5 others like this.
    10-13-14 11:56 AM
  17. Corbu's Avatar
    Conclusion

    I was going to skip testing out the BlackBerry Passport, but my curiosity got the best of me and I am thankful that it did. The BlackBerry 10 OS has always interested me with the fantastic BlackBerry Hub, swiping interface, and app expansion through Android.

    Unlike other smartphone operating systems, BlackBerry continues to focus on communications and using your device to be productive. Most of the people working for government agencies I work with as a professional engineer use BlackBerry devices and the Passport gives them the ability to leave the iPhone behind and slap one smartphone on their belt.

    BlackBerry took a gamble with the Passport, but going back to their QWERTY roots and innovating is what I think they needed to generate excitement for BlackBerry again. It is probably a niche market for the Passport, but I think it was the best option for them and may turn out to be the device that makes people ask for a new BlackBerry at work.
    sidhuk, Mr BBRY, jxnb and 2 others like this.
    10-13-14 11:58 AM
  18. slipstream89's Avatar
    I missed my order for $8 too it's ok opportunity will come again, this sell off has created a lot of oversold opportunities





    The markets appear to be rebounding after yet again another selloff. BBRY stayed above $9 as the Nasdaq dropped about 1.25%. Great!

    HALO dropped below $8, so I greedily placed a limit order at $7.95, which triggered it to turn on a dime and bounce as soon as it touched $7.96. Figures! Some people must be making some serious money as this market continues to be played like a fiddle! Crazy stuff!


    Posted via CB10
    10-13-14 12:18 PM
  19. bungaboy's Avatar
    "Conclusion
    I was going to skip testing out the BlackBerry Passport, but my curiosity got the best of me and I am thankful that it did. The BlackBerry 10 OS has always interested me with the fantastic BlackBerry Hub, swiping interface, and app expansion through Android.

    Unlike other smartphone operating systems, BlackBerry continues to focus on communications and using your device to be productive. Most of the people working for government agencies I work with as a professional engineer use BlackBerry devices and the Passport gives them the ability to leave the iPhone behind and slap one smartphone on their belt.

    BlackBerry took a gamble with the Passport, but going back to their QWERTY roots and innovating is what I think they needed to generate excitement for BlackBerry again. It is probably a niche market for the Passport, but I think it was the best option for them and may turn out to be the device that makes people ask for a new BlackBerry at work.

    Contributor's rating: 9.5 out of 10"
    sidhuk, W Hoa, Corbu and 8 others like this.
    10-13-14 12:21 PM
  20. W Hoa's Avatar
    "Technologies that Matter" series forum - The New Mobility: BlackBerry CEO John Chen on the Paradox of Simplicity

    ORGANISED BY: MIT Enterprise Forum Hong Kong
    TIME: Friday, October 17, 2014 - 15:30 to 17:30
    VENUE: C.K.K. auditorium, Hong Kong Science Park
    Chen is going to be entertaining the crowd for two hours this Friday (Thursday)?
    10-13-14 12:47 PM
  21. La Emperor's Avatar
    Posted using BlackBerry passport.
    WOW! 9.5 out of 10. ( from someone who initially thought of skipping a review )
    sidhuk, Mr BBRY, bungaboy and 1 others like this.
    10-13-14 01:26 PM
  22. sidhuk's Avatar
    Excellent read here.
    http://berryflow.com/2014/10/blackbe...consumer-apps/

    Posted using BlackBerry passport.
    10-13-14 01:33 PM
  23. KenFletch's Avatar
    Excellent read here.
    Why BlackBerry Secretly Moved Away From Consumer Apps

    Posted using BlackBerry passport.
    disappointed by the lack of glam shot but interesting words
    10-13-14 01:53 PM
  24. FijiBB's Avatar
    FBI director: iPhones shields pedophiles from cops - Oct. 13, 2014

    Apple's new privacy features protect kidnappers, pedophiles and terrorists, according to FBI director James Comey.
    In an interview on CBS' "60 Minutes" on Sunday, Comey said Apple's encryption standards for iPhones and iPads "put people beyond the law."
    Apple (AAPL, Tech30) recently took measures to enhance user privacy. Now, only users have the key to unlock text messages, photos and emails on their device. As such, iOS 8 will shield your data from anyone -- including police.
    Here's how it works: You send a text message that's encrypted on your device. It passes through Apple servers as jumbled code nobody can crack. And it can only get decrypted by your friend's iPhone passcode.
    Google (GOOG) has announced it's doing the same for its Android devices.
    The FBI director isn't pleased.
    "The notion that people have devices... that with court orders, based on a showing of probable cause in a case involving kidnapping or child exploitation or terrorism, we could never open that phone? My sense is that we've gone too far when we've gone there," Comey told CBS.
    Comey compared selling iPhones to selling "cars with trunks that couldn't ever be opened by law enforcement with a court order."

    But there are two things that are wrong with that statement:
    1) The FBI can still get your phone data. Now, they can't do it secretly by going to Apple or Google. Agents must knock on your front door with a warrant in hand -- the way it's always been.
    If you don't give the FBI access to your phone, it can ask a federal judge to force you. If you refuse, the government can throw you in jail and hold you in contempt of court.
    The FBI and Apple did not respond to requests for comment.
    Joel Kurtzberg is a New York lawyer who specializes in First Amendment cases (in which journalists often refuse court orders to disclose sources). He said the biggest difference now is that the FBI can't be covert when it wants your data.
    "This is going to make it harder for law enforcement. Now, they'll have to tip off their target," he said. "And it will result in instances where someone will destroy evidence."
    But even for the most dangerous cases, there are still workarounds. Video surveillance -- the classic kind -- can spy on someone as they type their passcode. And the NSA has technology to slip device-controlling malware into phones anyway.

    2) Opening devices to law enforcement means opening them to hackers. When it comes to data, possession of a key is everything. If your passcode is the only thing that unlocks your digital life, then it doesn't matter if the FBI presents Apple or Google with a warrant -- or if hackers break into the company's servers. They won't get anything useful.
    The FBI wants companies to keep a backdoor into your life. That's a problem, because as Comey himself has said in the past, everyone is under attack by hackers.
    As Comey said in a previous episode of 60 Minutes: "There are those who've been hacked by the Chinese and those who don't know they've been hacked by the Chinese."

    "You can't have it both ways," said David Oscar Markus, a Miami defense attorney with expertise in police searches and seizures. "If there's a backdoor, it can be exploited. The government shouldn't get to pick and choose what's protected."
    10-13-14 04:38 PM
  25. Soumaila Somtore's Avatar
    Sorry but i do not believe that IOS 8 encryption is beyond hackers or the law enforcement.
    10-13-14 04:48 PM
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