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View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.66%
  • No

    413 37.34%
  1. morlock_man's Avatar
    May have just secured funding for my green start-up.

    Whee!
    05-05-14 11:53 AM
  2. greggebhardt's Avatar
    I am thinking we will not be having a rally today.
    05-05-14 12:01 PM
  3. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Right. Now if they would just be kind enough to hand over those trillions that would get the SP to about $1000/share, and we are all in the money.

    Explain this to me please. BlackBerry already has the lion's share of big enterprise, as they like to brag about. The enterprise has trillions and trillions, as you've have pointed out. So, where is the money ?? And what do you mean by saying that they 'need' to put it to use? You guys are something else sometimes - what the hell are these companies and their trillions waiting for ? If it's always been about enterprise, why did the bottom of the boat drop out when consumer sales died? This is sheer magical thinking.

    Yes, enterprise is very important, but some of us in here really need to get some fresh air. There is more than a touch of pseudo-religious, cultish thinking going on. All I said yesterday was that it's delusional to tell ourselves that if BlackBerry are falling behind with BBMx, it doesn't matter because they don't care about that because it's 'all about enterprise'. BlackBerry are bending over backwards trying to court enterprise right now, and we are now waiting until November for the tidal wave of enterprise money that was supposed to be pouring into our pockets by now - remember ? BES 10 and all that? Now it's all about BES 12...in November. Fine, and I think BlackBerry have a good chance at doing very well with enterprise. I just happen to recognise that real success is about more than that, and that it's impossible to isolate one aspect of the company from another.

    Why isn't all of enterprise signing on for BES 10 right now, and then waiting for the BES 12 improvements to drop in November ?

    Now, I do support BB, and I do buy shares. I'm just not into committing shocking logical fallacies when investing my money, or doing anything really. The mistake SOME people seem to be making is in assuming to begin with that BlackBerry will thrive, and then shifting the future source of the riches to whichever part of the company isn't currently struggling. I just see no virtue in this.

    Enterprise is very important, and BlackBerry are well-positioned to do very well. If this weren't the case, I wouldn't own shares. BUT, BlackBerry is also a brand, and that means that like any other brand there is huge value and risk in winning or losing at WHATEVER they compete at. If they are in the consumer IM game, then they must be in it to win it. I personally think they know this, and do want to win. And, again, I hope to see full BBMx soon.

    Join the Cause @ BlackBerry Bootleg Marketing Channel - C003483F4
    Just some thoughts

    1. Current Enterprise customers don't generate much cash in the game because they're from the "old" system. The licensing was then perpetual licenses because what BlackBerry wanted then was to sell DEVICES. Now the strategy is "upside down", i.e sell services - whatever device they have - and offer the crispiest experience with BlackBerry devices. That's much of a change, on all fronts, marketing included.

    2. BBMx is a *free* "appeals product" to sustain the brand image (and recognition), BBM store is a naked baby and while encouraging, it'll take years to generate significant revenues (margins). On the other hand, eBBM requires BES10+ and is much appreciated in regulated industries but also wherever there's a need of privacy/security (lawyers, doctors, consultants, finance ...). Appeals product too, but with a different target : Sell BES10+.

    3. As for QNX, on the enterprise front, the brand has to "vanish" (a little) to push the multi-platform features. Yes, they do currently say "you like apple or android better ? No problem, we're here to help". As a marketing expert, you probably know that you would'nt push aggressive marketing over the brand ... but over the product : BES10. I've been noticing this during last enterprise show : BES everywhere, BlackBerry as a supplier ...

    4. BES10 V.S BES12 : it only affects those enterprises that currently use BES5, for others, the migration path is clear and free; only those with a large fleet of legacy devices may stand the way you describe it.

    Finally: One can testify I'm involved and supportive of (quite) everything BlackBerry and CrackBerry, where most (not to say all) members are using their devices as individuals. OF COURSE I'd like BlackBerry to shine and prosper in the consumers' world. It's just a question of timing, the one you deal with when you have to make a choice between "show" and "dough". You cannot build a 50 floor tower on sand, you need solid foundation for that. That's what they're doing right now; building around the tenements with power plants and tracing the roads to lead to the yard.
    snejpa, rarsen, zyben and 8 others like this.
    05-05-14 12:01 PM
  4. zyben's Avatar
    Here’s What the BlackBerry 10.3 Icons Look Like

    Been itching for more BlackBerry 10.3 goodness after the last tidbit of ‘Signature Action’? Michael Clewley dropped another teaser in his BBM Channel.

    Team BlackBerry has been pretty vocal about discontinuing the dark gradient box behind the icons. Additionally, you can see some of the icons have been given a makeover with a flat design.

    The icons now only have a thin drop-shadow effect. Otherwise, the new icons look leaps and bounds better than before. What say you? Sound off in the comments if you like the way BlackBerry 10.3 icons look.

    BlackBerry 10.3 New Icon Style Revealed | N4BB
    05-05-14 12:18 PM
  5. morlock_man's Avatar
    Know why it hasn't popped yet?

    Because Lengend is having trouble getting the new Z10 update online and the markets are worried.

    Chen must have sent the BBRY Choppers filled with BBRY Ninjas Leakssassins after him.
    05-05-14 12:45 PM
  6. rarsen's Avatar
    This is OT but still of interest, and not only for Canadians. He has the reputation of being the ultimate long duration thinker and not so much on technical stocks (not even in his friend Bill Gates' Microsoft). Appreciate if Morgan or someone else having followed him over the years can shed some light on this. Though realize he saved a billion undervalued price on his latest aquisition, and he probably has some staff proposing some moves :

    Warren Buffett: If you think hes off his game, just remember all those other times everybody thought hed lost it | Financial Post
    Warren Buffett ups energy bet as Berkshire snaps up SNCs Altalink for $3.2-billion | Financial Post

    Sorry for this as Inquiring Mind Needs To Know, as Buffet and Watsa profiles are parts of my initial interest in BB. Live Long, smell the roses and eventually Prosper.
    Corbu, zyben, 3_M4N and 2 others like this.
    05-05-14 12:48 PM
  7. ibpluto's Avatar
    Heres What the BlackBerry 10.3 Icons Look Like

    Been itching for more BlackBerry 10.3 goodness after the last tidbit of Signature Action? Michael Clewley dropped another teaser in his BBM Channel.

    Team BlackBerry has been pretty vocal about discontinuing the dark gradient box behind the icons. Additionally, you can see some of the icons have been given a makeover with a flat design.

    The icons now only have a thin drop-shadow effect. Otherwise, the new icons look leaps and bounds better than before. What say you? Sound off in the comments if you like the way BlackBerry 10.3 icons look.

    BlackBerry 10.3 New Icon Style Revealed | N4BB
    That's a Z10 aspect ratio screen.....and it supports 5 rows



    CB10'n it via da Z...30
    zyben likes this.
    05-05-14 12:53 PM
  8. morlock_man's Avatar
    Crap.

    Challenger disaster.

    Oh the humanity.
    05-05-14 01:07 PM
  9. morganplus8's Avatar
    rarsen[/B];10319565]This is OT but still of interest, and not only for Canadians. He has the reputation of being the ultimate long duration thinker and not so much on technical stocks (not even in his friend Bill Gates' Microsoft). Appreciate if Morgan or someone else having followed him over the years can shed some light on this. Though realize he saved a billion undervalued price on his latest aquisition, and he probably has some staff proposing some moves :

    Warren Buffett: If you think he’s off his game, just remember all those other times everybody thought he’d lost it | Financial Post
    Warren Buffett ups energy bet as Berkshire snaps up SNC’s Altalink for $3.2-billion | Financial Post

    Sorry for this as Inquiring Mind Needs To Know, as Buffet and Watsa profiles are parts of my initial interest in BB. Live Long, smell the roses and eventually Prosper.
    Buffet is famous for what he doesn't invest in, and yet, he should be praised for the formula that he uses to dodge pitfalls along the way. He prefers hard assets, inelastic consumer demand products and necessities of life. I would think that his average depreciation rate for all of the assets under Berkshire's control would not raise above 10%. This means he is holding REAL assets, the kind you can go to the bank with and leverage their potential. In fact, we aren't that much different than him, our principle asset, our house, is one of those "investments" that Buffet would approve of. When you invest with Warren, you are investing in North America, its people, infrastructure and future. We can all learn something from his process, I for one could never invest in AAPL. For me it has solid numbers, that's true, but, I don't like their product and that's enough for me to stay clear of the stock. Before anyone claims "I don't know their products", not so fast, I have spent a month on my latest iPad with LTE and iOS 7.1.1 and it is really outdated and very poorly written software. I don't know why they aren't losing sales. I don't get it so I won't invest in it.
    Corbu, ibpluto, zyben and 7 others like this.
    05-05-14 01:41 PM
  10. ibpluto's Avatar
    Before anyone claims "I don't know their products", not so fast, I have spent a month on my latest iPad with LTE and iOS 7.1.1 and it is really outdated and very poorly written software. I don't know why they aren't losing sales. I don't get it so I won't invest in it.
    I could not agree more ..... the velocity at which their products sell is mystifying to me. Such an average product for such an above average price.
    rarsen, zyben, sidhuk and 5 others like this.
    05-05-14 02:21 PM
  11. morlock_man's Avatar
    Look like someone might have moved the launch window to the last 30 minutes of the day.

    Nothing to do but pop popcorn and wait and see.
    05-05-14 02:38 PM
  12. greggebhardt's Avatar
    Look like someone might have moved the launch window to the last 30 minutes of the day.

    Nothing to do but pop popcorn and wait and see.
    Not going to happen today.
    05-05-14 02:45 PM
  13. morlock_man's Avatar
    Every time I get bummed out looking at the state of BBRY on the Nasdaq... I take a look at BB on the TSX where I actually own shares and suddenly everything seems so much better.
    Korepab, Corbu, bungaboy and 3 others like this.
    05-05-14 02:48 PM
  14. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    BUMP! I may have missed a response from one of you, so I thought to repost. Sorry for redundancy:




    Can anyone answer whether or not we have already taken on the share dilution that Watsa scored?
    I recall us crossing the 10 mark, so I would think that dilution has happened, and thus we should be in better position going forth(?)

    Can someone correct me here?

    Thanks.
    05-05-14 03:23 PM
  15. Bacon Munchers's Avatar
    .... I have spent a month on my latest iPad with LTE and iOS 7.1.1 and it is really outdated and very poorly written software. I don't know why they aren't losing sales. I don't get it so I won't invest in it.
    Me neither., but a few things come to mind:

    Marketing genius, endless pockets to campaign, nostalgia, youth following, stock buyback for artificial propping.


    Oh ya, and really cool phone screen/body colors (a la 5c).
    05-05-14 03:30 PM
  16. Corbu's Avatar
    This one is pretty long...

    How Blackberry Plans to Win Back Banks Business - American Banker Article

    BlackBerry's new chief executive, John Chen, has a simple vision for winning back market share in the financial, healthcare and government markets: providing a hyper-secure environment for mobile devices.

    But will his vision of a secure ecosystem for mobile devices resonate with large bank clients, many of which are starting to migrate away from BlackBerry or are thinking about it? Citigroup, Bank of America and Credit Suisse have all publicly spoken of shifting from issuing BlackBerrys to employees to letting staffers use their own devices.

    Analyst firm Gartner actually warned clients still using BlackBerry to "decide on a new course of action" in a September report, citing BlackBerry's mounting financial woes stemming from its eroding market share.

    Chen was brought in to fix the beleaguered mobile device maker in November, having previously engineered a turnaround at database manufacturer Sybase. When Chen joined Sybase in 1998, the company had been losing money for four years following an overall downturn in the economy and problems in its Japanese division. Chen curtailed operations in areas in which Sybase is unprofitable and broke the company down into smaller, more manageable chunks.

    In an interview with American Banker Friday, Chen outlined a short-term plan for the Waterloo, Ontario, mobile device company that is laser-focused on security. Secure smartphones; the BlackBerry Enterprise Server 12, which is scheduled to debut in November and will manage iPhone, Android, Windows and old and new BlackBerry devices; and secure enterprise messaging based on BlackBerry Messenger, an instant messaging system for BlackBerry devices are the cornerstones. In coming releases, the company will connect handsets, server and messaging software, conceivably creating an airtight infrastructure for mobile communications.

    Chen points out that awareness of security and identity management rises all the time in the financial industry. He says BlackBerry has an advantage over competitors like Good Technology, AirWatch, and MobileIron because of the time-proven, patented security components of its technology.

    "The Federal Reserve Bank and OCC put cybersecurity as one of the top risk factors for all financial institutions in the U.S." he says. "This plays to the strength of BlackBerry. Because of our network operating center and all our patents, and because of the way we encrypt messages, the way we build our handset and server, we have the only end-to-end encryption."

    Observers say the company, whose BlackBerry Enterprise Server is still in use at many banks for managing employees' mobile devices, has a chance.

    "BlackBerry technology has a strong foothold in the [financial services] market," notes Jacob Jegher, research director at Celent. "BlackBerry Enterprise Server has been the de facto standard for years in terms of managing security and policies for corporate-issued BlackBerry mobile devices."

    Enabling its server software to manage all devices, not just BlackBerry phones, is an important move for the company.

    "If BlackBerry is to survive in this market, this is what they need to focus on," Jegher says. "Their only move at this point to stay relevant in their core market is to say 'stay with us and let us manage all your devices, we can support everything.'"

    One challenge is making the server work with diverse devices, Jegher points out. For instance, Android devices are more open and harder to manage in a centralized way. "Once you open to other devices and operating systems, it's almost a Pandora's box," he says.

    "I like this idea a lot for [BlackBerry]," Jegher says. "Is it too little, too late? That's the big question. There are a lot of competitors."

    James Gordon, chief technology officer at Needham Bank in Massachusetts, also wonders about the "too little, too late" question.

    "Blackberry has to create something markedly different and new," Gordon says. "They were innovators of push email. Before that, there was no such thing as a wireless email connection. They innovated, they rightfully earned their spot at the top of the market, they held that until 2008, but they lost that crown as soon as the iPhone came out in 2007." Apple changed the game by positioning smartphones as more than just a device for email, but a whole mobile operating system.

    "In order to get ahead, you can't just feature match, that will not get you ahead of the game," he says.

    Needham Bank two years ago began using MobileIron, which provides device management with one dashboard to manage apps across all employee devices, Gordon says. Needham Bank employees are allowed to use whatever devices they want; some employees have been issued iPhones and iPads.

    "I'm glad BlackBerry finally woke up, but it's a stronger market now with MobileIron, AirWatch, Good Technology, and BlackBerry," Gordon says. "I welcome BlackBerry to that space, but they will have to prove themselves."

    At the mention of such competitors, Chen counters, "You're comparing the NFL with Division 3."

    Google is also rumored to be considering launching its own device management software.

    Chen acknowledges that BlackBerry has lost share in the device management market. One reason is when the trend toward bring-your-own-device came, the company did not adjust its server right away so it could be used to manage all the different devices employees were bringing in.

    "The company has caught up to the fact that we need to be able to manage not only a BlackBerry device but Android, iPhone and Windows handsets," he says.

    He adds that BlackBerry still counts many of the biggest financial services firms as its customers.

    "I'm very comfortable with the fact that we have lot of good technologists, know-how, patents, I'm quite encouraged about what we can get done," Chen says.

    BlackBerry Enterprise Server 12, like the current version 10, will help corporate and government users manage policies, rules and restrictions on smartphones used by their employees. At the heart of the server is an embedded kernel, called QNX, that's used by Apple's CarPlay in-auto entertainment systems and may be used by Google for its Android in-vehicle system. "It's a secure kernel, it's designed for security, and we are the number one player in the connected car world, as well as medical equipment and control systems," Chen says. This could become important as smartphones and tablets talk to other objects such as wireless sensors in the "Internet of things" of the future.

    The Enterprise Server runs through BlackBerry's Network Operations Center, which according to Chen is the most secure infrastructure available. "It's firewall protected, everything is encrypted in and out, with authenticated devices," he says.

    Chen refers to BlackBerry Messenger as a secure intranet portal. "That's where we put a lot of effort into making sure the outside world doesn't crack into the inside world," he says. BlackBerry Messenger has 85 million active users and 125 million registered users.

    "The short-term, immediate plan is to get all these anchor pieces connected together in a secure, highly productive, collaborative way," Chen says.

    Later, the company will work on identity management systems to provide extra authentication for employees as they are logging in. There will be a control center to monitor who is accessing what.

    Farther down the road are plans for a connected, secure ecosystem for the Internet of things. Internet of things refers to the not-too-distant day when everyday objects have network connectivity, allowing them to send and receive data. Some cars and wireless sensors already have such connectivity. This idea is that someday, everything from your refrigerator to your toaster to items in a grocery aisle will be streaming information to your mobile device.
    05-05-14 04:44 PM
  17. Corbu's Avatar
    I could not agree more ..... the velocity at which their products sell is mystifying to me. Such an average product for such an above average price.
    Indeed.

    Apple's resounding appeal and success (though difficult to justify for most of us here) should be the object of numerous doctoral dissertations dealing with Social Studies, Anthropology, Human/Animal Behaviour and, oh yes... Marketing. More so than Science & Technology.
    05-05-14 04:49 PM
  18. BBUK14's Avatar
    Indeed.

    Apple's resounding appeal and success (though difficult to justify for most of us here) should be the object of numerous doctoral dissertations dealing with Social Studies, Anthropology, Human/Animal Behaviour and, oh yes... Marketing. More so than Science & Technology.
    It's simple brand and culture-building excellence. No dissertations needed. There is of course a lot of psychology and behavioural stuff there, but it's actually really simple. They just happen to understand, and be very good at it.

    Join the Cause @ BlackBerry Bootleg Marketing Channel - C003483F4
    Bacon Munchers likes this.
    05-05-14 04:54 PM
  19. BBUK14's Avatar
    Just some thoughts

    1. Current Enterprise customers don't generate much cash in the game because they're from the "old" system. The licensing was then perpetual licenses because what BlackBerry wanted then was to sell DEVICES. Now the strategy is "upside down", i.e sell services - whatever device they have - and offer the crispiest experience with BlackBerry devices. That's much of a change, on all fronts, marketing included.

    2. BBMx is a *free* "appeals product" to sustain the brand image (and recognition), BBM store is a naked baby and while encouraging, it'll take years to generate significant revenues (margins). On the other hand, eBBM requires BES10+ and is much appreciated in regulated industries but also wherever there's a need of privacy/security (lawyers, doctors, consultants, finance ...). Appeals product too, but with a different target : Sell BES10+.

    3. As for QNX, on the enterprise front, the brand has to "vanish" (a little) to push the multi-platform features. Yes, they do currently say "you like apple or android better ? No problem, we're here to help". As a marketing expert, you probably know that you would'nt push aggressive marketing over the brand ... but over the product : BES10. I've been noticing this during last enterprise show : BES everywhere, BlackBerry as a supplier ...

    4. BES10 V.S BES12 : it only affects those enterprises that currently use BES5, for others, the migration path is clear and free; only those with a large fleet of legacy devices may stand the way you describe it.

    Finally: One can testify I'm involved and supportive of (quite) everything BlackBerry and CrackBerry, where most (not to say all) members are using their devices as individuals. OF COURSE I'd like BlackBerry to shine and prosper in the consumers' world. It's just a question of timing, the one you deal with when you have to make a choice between "show" and "dough". You cannot build a 50 floor tower on sand, you need solid foundation for that. That's what they're doing right now; building around the tenements with power plants and tracing the roads to lead to the yard.
    Thanks SF. I actually happen to agree with you. Also, the things BlackBerry needs to do now are different than the things they should have done a year ago when they had more money. I still think that it's impossible or foolish to try to separate enterprise success from general brand perception, but as I said, I agree with your general view of things. You know, all I'd actually stated was that I hoped to see full BBMx soon as Snapchat etc were launching video lol.

    The thing is, regardless of the changes to the enterprise model, huge damage was done simply by the perception that BlackBerry was going out of business. Even though we in here can say it shouldn't matter and that the world is crazy etc, a Z3 disaster, or a BBMx flop WILL affect enterprise success. People just don't like a loser. Again, I agree that enterprise is a priority, but all BlackBerry ventures will continue to influence the others, perhaps with the exception of QNX.

    Join the Cause @ BlackBerry Bootleg Marketing Channel - C003483F4
    05-05-14 05:18 PM
  20. bungaboy's Avatar


    Turn the bass up.

    (Fingers crossed it doesn't go the same route as the Challenger.)
    Fundamental rule of Civil Engineering . . . . . Brute Force always works! LoL
    05-05-14 05:30 PM
  21. sidhuk's Avatar
    Corporate Boards Tell C-Level Executives: You?re Responsible for Security

    I can geek out over charts, so imagine my excitement when I came across this beautiful, dynamic infographic showing the world?s biggest data breachesat the appropriately-named InformationIsBeautiful.Net.

    It was a timely discovery, with the CEO of a leading US retailer resigning on Monday, due in large part to ongoing fallout over the compromising of up to 70 million customer records back in November.

    It wasn?t the biggest data breach in recent years. Several other multi-billion-dollar U.S. firms have suffered worse thefts in recent years, at least by the numbers affected. Hackers stole the financial information of 90 million customers in another major discount retailer?s database in 2007. Theringleader of that theft, Albert Gonzalez, also broke into the database of a leading financial processing firm, in 2008, compromising the information of a whopping 130 million consumers.

    The board of directors of neither of those firms forced out their respective CEOs. Indeed, the CEO of one of those firms now offers sage advice to other companies on how to handle such breaches. The CEO who resigned Monday probably didn?t deserve to take the fall. He probably wouldn?t have, either, if it had occurred closer to the beginning of his tenure (2007).

    But the environment has changed in the last half-decade. Companies that have sufferedbreaches are now hiring security experts from the NSA to take over as CIO. And based on this precedent, public board of directors are now holding CEOs, even in non-regulated industries such as retail, directly accountable for governance and risk management.

    ?It?s a new era for boards to take a proactive role in understanding what the risks are,?Cynthia Larose, chair of the privacy and security practice at the law firm Mintz Levin, told the Associated Press. ?Ultimately, the CEO is responsible in that ?the buck stops here,?? Ken Perkins, a Morningstar analyst, told ABC News.

    Coincidentally, a security researcher revealed today that iOS 7 doesn?t encrypt email attachments stored ?at rest? on an iPhone or IPad, even though Apple previously said it was. (By contrast, BlackBerry has long encrypted emails end-to-end, including while at rest on its smartphones. It also plans to encrypt messages sent over the coming enterprise version of BBM.)

    A stolen e-mail attachment is no customer database breach. But if one is vulnerable, chances are the other is, too.

    Security is no longer just the job of your IT department. As business executives wield increasing influence over the software and hardware (BYOD!) that they and their employees use, they also need to COPE (and COBO) with the potential for security risks and failures arising. Else, they?ll find themselves with a surprised expression as they fall on their swords the next time a data breach arises.


    About Eric Lai
    A former tech journalist, I now track and opine about the latest news and trends in enterprise mobility for BlackBerry. Read the Inside for BlackBerry blog at blogs.blackberry.com. Or follow me on Twitter (ericylai)
    http://blogs.blackberry.com/2014/05/...-for-security/

    Posted using Z30. Best of the best Smart phone in the world.
    bungaboy, rarsen, Corbu and 7 others like this.
    05-05-14 09:49 PM
  22. Corbu's Avatar
    05-05-14 10:16 PM
  23. Corbu's Avatar
    HTC's turn to resort to outsourcing...

    HTC Outsources Some Smartphone Production - WSJ.com

    Compal, Wingtech to Produce New Models in Midprice Desire Series

    TAIPEI— HTC Corp. began to outsource production of some of its smartphones for the first time this quarter, looking to slash costs and better pursue new customers in developing markets.

    The unprofitable Taiwanese smartphone maker has selected Taiwan-based contract manufacturer Compal Electronics Inc. and China's Wingtech Group for at least three of the new models in its midprice Desire series, said people familiar with the matter. Both assemblers began to mass produce smartphones for HTC this spring, the people said. Traditionally, HTC has produced all of its phones at its own factories.

    The move accompanies other efforts by HTC to turn around its business. Chairwoman Cher Wang has taken a more active role in management in the past year, and the company recently hired Samsung Electronics Co.'s former U.S. marketing chief, Paul Golden, as a consultant to beef up its marketing.

    HTC has long focused on high-end phones and resisted outsourcing, even as competitors from Apple Inc. to Nokia Corp. have turned to contract manufacturers to focus on design and save costs over the years. But as HTC struggles to hold its ground against Samsung and rapidly growing Chinese brands, it has decided to launch more low-price phones this year with the help of contract manufacturers.

    Once the world's largest smartphone maker by shipments at its peak in 2011, HTC has contended with a stock slump of more than 86% amid unsuccessful marketing campaigns, supply-chain mishaps and growing competition. The mistakes brought HTC its second net loss on record in the first quarter, and it has fallen out of the world's top-10 smartphone makers since last year. The company's stock rose by the maximum daily limit of 6.9% on Monday to 169 New Taiwan dollars (US$5.59) on expectations that HTC would forecast a return to profit for the second quarter when it releases guidance on Tuesday.

    HTC declined to comment.

    Chief Financial Officer Chialin Chang said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal in March that HTC was considering the possibility of using contract manufacturers, but that the company had no plans to outsource its flagship HTC One line or its key midprice phone, the Desire 816. The company's high-end phones are still its earnings drivers, said Yuanta Research analyst Dennis Chan.
    While it is keeping production of its most advanced devices in-house, HTC has outsourced a high-power smartphone aimed at the China market. Chinese contract manufacturer Wingtech, which also makes phones for Chinese brands such as Xiaomi Inc., is preparing to mass produce the Desire 616, which will run a fast eight-core processor made by budget chip maker Mediatek Inc., said two people familiar with the matter.

    Wingtech also manufacturers HTC's least-expensive smartphone to date, the Desire 210, which was launched last month in India for 8,700 rupees (US$145), one of the people said.

    Taiwan's Compal, which also supplies Nokia, began production in the second quarter of some HTC Desire series smartphones, another person said.

    Mr. Chang said in February that the company would sell smartphones for as low as $150 to $200 this year. Last year, HTC's least-costly smartphone sold in China for $230.

    "Outsourcing will help HTC save some research-and-development costs," said Barclays technology analyst Dale Gai. "But it won't be the key driver of their profitability turnaround, as their major products are still produced in-house."
    zyben, rarsen, morganplus8 and 3 others like this.
    05-05-14 11:09 PM
  24. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    One of BlackBerry Chen's challenge was to break the permanent media bashing. While we all hope for more positive (yet we had a bunch), the baiting period seems over for now, especially in financial sphere.
    @BBUK14 : that's what I tried to explain (thanks for your response btw) in my previous post. You can't "have a break" if you do anything but focusing on a single, clear and invariant message : (like) "we're in the enterprise business, a place where no one can seriously state they do better. Now we're bringing this "better" to other platforms, including Windows Phone, before the end of the year, and we'll make money with that". Any noise around (apps, devices), where you can validly discuss the merits - because it's all about perception, not metrics or measurable track record - is counter productive.

    The key date is BES12 / Q10 launch. By then, be patient
    No news IS good news (Today's Nasdaq newsfeed on BBRY page).

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-capture.png
    Last edited by Superfly_FR; 05-06-14 at 04:26 AM. Reason: unrelated intial quote ;)
    jxnb, rarsen, morganplus8 and 5 others like this.
    05-06-14 04:23 AM
  25. BBUK14's Avatar
    One of BlackBerry Chen's challenge was to break the permanent media bashing. While we all hope for more positive (yet we had a bunch), the baiting period seems over for now, especially in financial sphere.
    @BBUK14 : that's what I tried to explain (thanks for your response btw) in my previous post. You can't "have a break" if you do anything but focusing on a single, clear and invariant message : (like) "we're in the enterprise business, a place where no one can seriously state they do better. Now we're bringing this "better" to other platforms, including Windows Phone, before the end of the year, and we'll make money with that". Any noise around (apps, devices), where you can validly discuss the merits - because it's all about perception, not metrics or measurable track record - is counter productive.

    The key date is BES12 / Q10 launch. By then, be patient
    No news IS good news (Today's Nasdaq newsfeed on BBRY page).

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    Yup, agree with you there - perception is the big factor that is hard to plot on charts or financial statements, but it's a big one.

    Even moderately successful sales of the Z3 and moderate growth of BBMx will help stave off media/cultural negativity while real, solid progress is made, in enterprise and elsewhere. The idea with consumer things and BBM for now is simply not to fail, as opposed to winning great victories.

    The media and public have a simple processing system: either BlackBerry = failure or BlackBerry = not failure. Negative news having anything to do with BlackBerry bleeds into the perception of the whole, and so in that respect you are right in saying that no news is good news (unless the news is good news, of course).

    The flip side is the Apple situation in which perception is so astonishingly positive that facts fade into the background and sales money pours in regardless of minor to medium level disasters. That's human behaviour and psychology for us.

    Join the Cause @ BlackBerry Bootleg Marketing Channel - C003483F4
    georg4BB, Mr BBRY, Corbu and 5 others like this.
    05-06-14 04:51 AM
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