View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

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1106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.66%
  • No

    413 37.34%
  1. bbmotion's Avatar
    OT. These 2 stocks went to the moon AH. PSDV and ALIM
    Once again, Thanks Morgan.
    12-18-13 09:33 PM
  2. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Like some have stated, it's possible to make a case of insolvency...likewise, it's possible to articulate a tangible value to assets...place your bets gentlemen.
    I love the contrarian outlook but it's not for everyone nor should it be played with anything other than disposable cash (as stated at nosium by SF)...not expecting anything green on Friday, best case is CHEN gets props for honest answers and approach to the issues imo. Still, I'm long, patient and pulling for the "home" team.

    Posted via CB10
    12-18-13 09:35 PM
  3. bergeron37's Avatar
    Like some have stated, it's possible to make a case of insolvency...likewise, it's possible to articulate a tangible value to assets...place your bets gentlemen.
    I love the contrarian outlook but it's not for everyone nor should it be played with anything other than disposable cash (as stated at nosium by SF)...not expecting anything green on Friday, best case is CHEN gets props for honest answers and approach to the issues imo. Still, I'm long, patient and pulling for the "home" team.

    Posted via CB10
    Pretty much my exact thoughts. I think the chances of this happening are a lot better than any surprise beating of the street's estimates.
    12-18-13 09:46 PM
  4. 3_M4N's Avatar
    Random found ... "Top ten Holding" ... can't be bad news
    Attachment 231205
    That is very interesting indeed. I'm both surprised that it's in an index fund and that it's one of the top ten holdings. I wonder how large the position is and what their average price per share is.

    Posted while peeking and flowing on my incredible BBQ10!
    12-18-13 10:16 PM
  5. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Windows is vulnerable if the users has administrative rights over the machine, in a enterprise environment where machines are locked down the OS is secure and used everywhere.

    > hum ... as a Windows powered solution provider since 1997, I may say it tends to be more and more secure, but the word "secure" alone does not fit. Just see your security updates logs (OS, office and I.E) and figure what happens between the time the exploit is discovered and patched ... but I get what you mean.
    <
    I think It's good to divide MDM in two alternatives, BYOD and company provided devices.
    BYOD
    BB10 and Balance are irrelevant because the product failed in the consumer market and no new efforts are expected in that direction. Everything comes down as how good is BES10 managing iOS and Android devices compared to other solutions. (I didn't understand your layer argument).

    > BES, if you omit BB devices usage is still relevant and matches (or surpasses) other solutions in the security POV. The layer argument is that, with BB10, it is the OS that is containerized while with non BB devices (even under BES) it is the apps.
    I believe the BYOD approach is interesting - while more and more challenged as a headache by IT teams - but I tend to consider BES more as a multi-platform MDM ...<
    Devices provisioned by companies
    If a company gives BB10 phones to employees they are going to keep their iPhones or Android phones for personal use. So what's the point of BB10, lets give them completely locked down iPhones so they can improve their productivity using the same system in both phones. And they are going to use tablets, convertibles and laptops to access company resources also, and BB10 is not a solution for that anyways. So again all comes down to how good is BES10 in managing iOS, Android and Windows (which is not supported now).

    > Why would they do that ? With the private/work Balance feature, they don't have to. While some "geeks" or "brand fans" will do, most will stick to their provisioned device for obvious reasons of budget and comfort. With legacy devices it was quite mandatory; with BB10, not anymore.
    This point is interesting though; if true, it means basically that BB10/BES powered users may count double in statistics : +1 for BB, -1 for competitors ...
    <
    I think Microsoft is the main rival because they can sell a more complete solution to manage: Identity, servers, cloud, laptops, mobile devices (iOS, Android and Windows). And they have services and software to sell on top of this solution that allows them to subsidize the cost of devices and MDM as a path to sell those products. For example, I understand cost of the Intune CAL is lower than BES10 and is by user up to 5 devices, BES10 is by device.
    > If you mean by this thats MS has a strong dominant position in enterprises and their offering is competitive, I agree.
    Now, anyone dealing with non MS devices MDM in windows environment will testify both of very strict policies and maintenance headaches.
    Last, FTR, Windows mobile security is nowhere close to BES's.
    And MS knows that. As of date, BES will interact natively with any Active Directory (or LDAP) environment, under the BES security layer. You know (maybe not) I've always pretended something was going to happen between MS and BlackBerry. I believe we're a few day from that, but this is pure speculation, of course.
    Last edited by Superfly_FR; 12-19-13 at 06:21 AM.
    jxnb, bungaboy and Randeman like this.
    12-19-13 02:38 AM
  6. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    My ego is rich ... "do not slice the company on hardware/software, but consumers/enterprises".
    My armchair C.E.O preach for months

    As far back as I can remember, BlackBerry never had any divisional presidents. They’ve had C-level titles, Vice Presidents, and Senior Vice Presidents. Unless I’m mistaken, there has never been a president of anything at BlackBerry. Think about this: John Chen’s first major hire was a guy with experience in the enterprise software business appointed to the role of president in a company that never had a president running the enterprise business before. This is a pretty obvious sign of how seriously Chen views the enterprise business.
    [fiction zone]
    If I push the logic (and over estimates myself, sorry for that) I'd say that BBM may become a real (it is already organized as such) independent entity. Because when I spoke about BBM in an Enterprise/BES perspective with BB reps two days ago, I was surprised by the firm response : "BBM is personal, not work" [and people have to know that MS Lynk and IBM Domino's IM are natively integrated in a BES/BB scheme (BB5/legacy and/or BES10/BB10].
    [/fiction zone]
    bungaboy and Randeman like this.
    12-19-13 02:52 AM
  7. georg4BB's Avatar
    Hi everyone, I have a qustion.
    I read recently in this and other threads, that BB needs to sell at least 20 millions devices per year, to reach break-even with hardware.
    Is this somehow fact or a wild guess?
    12-19-13 04:33 AM
  8. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Hi everyone, I have a qustion.
    I read recently in this and other threads, that BB needs to sell at least 20 millions devices per year, to reach break-even with hardware.
    Is this somehow fact or a wild guess?
    Everyone's guessing ... me included.
    I believe a proper approach would be in the 10 millions area.
    I've made some calculation attempts ... much lower than that, but let's keep very conservative.
    If you want to play with my calculations, FWIW, start here (and following posts) : http://forums.crackberry.com/news-ru...7/#post9705023
    bungaboy, plasmid_boy and georg4BB like this.
    12-19-13 06:25 AM
  9. bungaboy's Avatar
    The Australian


    BlackBerry's back

    Mitchell Bingemann
    The Australian
    December 19, 2013 12:00AM
    Paul Rubenstein Lawyer with ABL Law Firm with Blackberry smart phone Source: News Limited

    YOU'RE likely to elicit some strange stares if you insist Barack Obama, and in fact many of the world's leading business people, are addicts.

    But they are hooked on their BlackBerrys or, as they were once colloquially known, Crackberries.

    The device, which revolutionised on-the-go email and irrevocably blurred the lines between work and private life, has been battered and pulped in recent years by more consumer-friendly devices like Apple's iPhone and other smartphones using Google's Android software.

    It's difficult to fathom how quickly BlackBerry has ceded ground to its rivals, considering that five years ago you could walk into any boardroom in the country and see a bunch of suited men and women engaged in the BlackBerry prayer: hands in laps and heads bowed in quiet contemplation as they silently tapped into their phones.

    If you didn't know any better, you'd be forgiven for thinking they were praying for guidance.

    God knows, the company needs it now. Today BlackBerry's shares are down from a 2007 high of $230 to about $6 and its smartphone market share is well below 5 per cent. A few months ago things had become so dire the BlackBerry company had flirted with a $US4.7 billion sale to Fairfax Financial Holdings. It didn't go through with the sale, instead taking on a $US1bn investment from Fairfax and others, and has since shaken up its executives ranks and refocused on the market it once dominated: the business world.

    Now the message coming from interim chief executive John Chen is to target its "heritage and roots": corporate clients instead of consumer handset sales where Apple and Android dominate. It's a shrewd move because even as some consumers dump BlackBerry in favour of iPhones and Google-powered Android devices, there remains a group of business execs, corporate clients and government departments who continue to swear by the device.

    "I've had a BlackBerry since they were first released about 10 years ago," says Paul Rubenstein, a partner at leading commercial law firm Arnold Bloch Leibler in Sydney. "I've kept it instead of getting an iPhone or some other smartphone because it's predominantly a work tool. The killer thing is the keyboard, which is just fantastic and functional and easy to use."

    The BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) feature is an instant messaging application that allows users to chat or share content for free. Unlike email, users can conduct several conversations at the same time, see contacts' availability, send files and track message status.

    Rubenstein says ABL was one of the nation's first professional services firms to adopt a fleet of BlackBerry devices for its lawyers. Partners at the firm are given a choice of either an iPhone or BlackBerry device, but Rubenstein says a healthy proportion still opt for the BlackBerry.

    "There is a split between the personal and workspace on this phone, which is really important when you're dealing with sensitive client information. The iPhone doesn't provide that."

    Security and dealing with sensitive information has always been a drawcard for corporate clients jumping on the BlackBerry. The company zealously guards its users' private emails and messages - in fact, it's the reason Obama has been allowed to keep his beloved BlackBerry.

    But its security features have been a double-edged sword. Governments have been concerned that BlackBerry's encryption of users' data - which prevents BlackBerry or any third party, government or otherwise, from accessing private information sent between the devices - could be used by money launderers, terrorists or other criminals. In 2010, the United Arab Emirates briefly banned the device, while in 2011 the BlackBerry's free and secure messaging system copped criticism when it was used by London rioters to organise clashes with police.

    But for Chris Fitzgerald, head of ICT business at the Australian Transport and Safety Bureau, it's those types of security features that make the BlackBerry so valuable to government departments, which must abide by strict information security policies mandated by the Australian Signals Directorate.

    "Early on in the piece the iPhone just wasn't compliant with the security policies of the Australian government," he says.

    "On the other hand, the security features on the BlackBerry have been extremely valuable. We need to have the ability that if the device is lost there is no resident data that could be used against us. The attraction to us is that we can control the data that goes to the device so if it's lost we can guarantee control of it and wipe it if we need to."

    At first, Fitzgerald says ATSB officers couldn't see the point in taking BlackBerrys into the field. But he says they were quickly won over when some of the younger investigators started using them.

    Today, the bureau has about 90 BlackBerrys in operation among its staff.

    "The real beauty is that it's a work phone, but you can also have a personal profile that has no effect on the work side," he says.

    Professional services company Questas has also opted for BlackBerrys over iPhones, with its chief information officer Ferdinando Cosentino saying the latter just doesn't provide the security the business needs.

    "The iPhone is a consumer device, not designed primarily with business in mind. It means an inferior ability for systems administrators to control centrally all features and secure the device down - for example, to prevent users from downloading games," he says. "Apple, with the latest 5S and their iOS7 operating system, have added many of these features, so they are slowly catching up.

    "However, the greater data usage and the fact we are unable to lock-down the device and control it centrally are two major issues."
    12-19-13 06:52 AM
  10. georg4BB's Avatar
    Thanks Superfly, very interesting calculations.

    I think it was TH who wanted to reach break even in the summer with around 3.5 million units per quarter?

    I want to add my wild guess too: If BB reduces its hardware business to the absolute minimum, with a only 2 different new handsets per year and cutting costs, I have the "feeling" they might reach break-even with only 500.000 units per month (if they can sell them full price).

    And if Blackberry can stabilize the userbase around 20 million (coming from > 70 million) and the userbase orders new devices at least every 3 years - this could last out to keep the business.

    Too many ifs in my naive calculation, I know... but even if BB does not reach the numbers, I think they will not burn so much cash, that they need to stop the hardware-business anytime soon.

    I would love to see some numbers tomorrow to be able to make better calculations.
    12-19-13 07:32 AM
  11. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/executive-living/blackberrys-back/story-e6frg9zo-1226786066328

    The Australian

    1. Governments - check
    2. Corporations - check
    3. Consumers - coming soon
    12-19-13 08:05 AM
  12. jake simmons3's Avatar
    12-19-13 08:20 AM
  13. _dimi_'s Avatar
    Who else thinks QNX will showcase the Tesla S model at CES? :-)

    Posted via CB10
    Shanerredflag and bungaboy like this.
    12-19-13 08:23 AM
  14. morlock_man's Avatar
    BBRY should really go after organizations like Google that haven't updated their data to show past stock splits.

    BBRY never peaked over $200, it peaked over $140 after a 3 way stock split, which would have been equivalent to over $420 a share by the previous share count.
    12-19-13 08:37 AM
  15. jhowe204's Avatar
    Who else thinks QNX will showcase the Tesla S model at CES? :-)

    Posted via CB10
    Probably nobody... It will most likely be Mercedes as BlackBerry is a big sponsor of their F1 team.

    Go Jets go!
    12-19-13 08:41 AM
  16. BlackistheBerry's Avatar
    The logic that I find interesting.....

    If Chen doesn't mention BB10, it's because it is going to be discontinued.

    If Chen does mention BB10, it's because as a CEO he HAS to mention it.

    Baffling to me!
    Randeman, sidhuk and peter9477 like this.
    12-19-13 09:26 AM
  17. neteng1000's Avatar
    When do they report? Before or after market close tomorrow?

    Posted via CB10
    12-19-13 09:44 AM
  18. Randeman's Avatar
    8 a.m. eastern standard time.
    12-19-13 10:09 AM
  19. sidhuk's Avatar
    The logic that I find interesting.....

    If Chen doesn't mention BB10, it's because it is going to be discontinued.

    If Chen does mention BB10, it's because as a CEO he HAS to mention it.

    Baffling to me!
    Because people have Jobe to do.

    Posted using Z30. Best phone in the world.
    BlackistheBerry likes this.
    12-19-13 10:17 AM
  20. Corbu's Avatar
    What BlackBerry’s John Chen needs to tell shareholders | Dashboard - Yahoo Finance Canada

    What BlackBerry’s John Chen needs to tell shareholders

    It was beginning to look kind of lonely on BlackBerry’s “Meet Us” page.

    Apart from John Chen, the firm’s interim CEO, only the executive biographies of its recently appointed CFO and chief legal officer are on the roster. That will soon change, however, with the addition of former SAG AG mobile service president John Sims as BlackBerry’s new enterprise lead. This hire may be the best indication yet of what Chen will be discussing on BlackBerry’s quarterly earnings call this Friday.

    SAP doesn’t make devices, but its software handles everything from order-processing to human resources at many of the world’s largest firms. Other than Oracle, perhaps, SAP represents the software equivalent to what BlackBerry once was to business customers: a trusted standby. By recruiting Sims -- and by recently dismissing BlackBerry’s CMO -- Chen is making clear his immediate focus is on winning back the corporate sector, not playing catch-up to Apple in the consumer market.

    Unfortunately, Apple’s iPhone may not be the biggest threat to BlackBerry’s enterprise comeback. Last week, Toronto-based research firm IDC Canada hosted its annual Webcast of prediction in the Canadian technology sector for the coming year. According to Tony Olvet, IDC Canada’s group vice-president, devices running Google’ Android operating system are expected to see a substantial increase in enterprise market share in 2014.

    Already, 31 per cent of Canadian companies have told IDC they are supporting Android smartphones today, up from 22 per cent last year. Olvet forecast at least another 10 per cent bump in Android adoption over the next 12 months, with another 13 per cent of corporations evaluating the platform.

    “The tide has certainly turned,” said Olvet, noting that concerns around security issues with Android are quickly disappearing as vendors like Samsung introduce features such as its Knox data protection in devices like the Galaxy S4. “The growth of Android has major implications in a country like Canada, which was once dominated by one smartphone brand alone, the BlackBerry. While Apple has made large strides securing credibility in organizations, Android is starting to do the same.”

    What’s driving Android growth among businesses is the same thing that drove iOS growth among businesses: lots of productivity apps. This remains a huge hole in BlackBerry’s portfolio, and Chen will need to outline a vision that demonstrates how he will work around it. That’s why Sims could be a huge asset for BlackBerry. SAP has spent years taking the large, monolithic software that runs in enterprise data centres and figuring out ways to render critical information across mobile devices. That’s the kind of expertise Chen and the BlackBerry team need right now.

    “We see a big uptick in managed mobility and in multi-platform support,” Olvet said.

    Exactly. So while everyone else freaks out about what will probably be reports of terrifyingly bleak device sales on Friday, focus on what Chen and Sims plan to do with BlackBerry Enterprise Server 10 (BES10) Version 10.2. It could end up being a more important product than any smartphone BlackBerry has ever made.
    12-19-13 10:33 AM
  21. bungaboy's Avatar
    Who else thinks QNX will showcase the Tesla S model at CES? :-)

    Posted via CB10
    It's in the 2014 Viper!

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-viper-qnx.jpg

    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-viper-2014.jpg
    Korepab likes this.
    12-19-13 10:33 AM
  22. bergeron37's Avatar
    Love Vipers...much like BB there isn't a whole lot of flash about them...strictly business.
    bungaboy likes this.
    12-19-13 10:49 AM
  23. leafs123's Avatar
    Tesla has their own OS which is a Linux variant.
    12-19-13 11:05 AM
  24. rarsen's Avatar
    General security information on Boeing losing contract:
    Thanks to NSA spying, Boeing lost a $4.5 billion contract - SmartPlanet
    12-19-13 11:23 AM
  25. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Who else thinks QNX will showcase the Tesla S model at CES? :-)

    Posted via CB10
    haha
    Make your bets here : http://forums.crackberry.com/general...rprise-882588/
    But don't reach the end before you bet !!!
    _dimi_ and bungaboy like this.
    12-19-13 11:25 AM
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