View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1104. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.77%
  • No

    411 37.23%
  1. Bugmapper's Avatar
    "Leaning on the stupid button "

    Great line !

    Posted via CB10 on a Z10 root device!
    09-15-13 12:17 PM
  2. JLagoon's Avatar
    Trend Micro covers BB10 security features. Spotlight: Security Features of BlackBerry 10 - N4BB
    09-15-13 12:22 PM
  3. JLagoon's Avatar
    Closing the business and incurring costs is a Faucette thing, he is leaning on the stupid button because that is what he is paid to do. Prem/Heins/BB are looking at this from the going concern side of the business and know that $ 8.0 billion in revenues and a 40% gross margin is valuable to others. You decide which plan makes more sense.
    You should get invited to CNBC with this post as the material, Morgan. How does Monday sound?
    09-15-13 12:27 PM
  4. uzo123's Avatar
    Kid Vibe!!

    At the risk of repeating myself, the value of BB's hardware does range from minus $ 800 million to plus $ 2.5 Billion minimum. You arrive at minus $ 800 million by extrapolating what it cost BlackBerry to fire 5,000 workers, ( BB took a $ 345 million charge) and times it by 2.2 times as many employees that will be let go. Then there is the write downs on all of the product they have collecting dust on the shelves. So there you have the worst case scenario, a closure of the hardware business. On the high end, say you make your phone for an ACU of $ 280/unit and you sell it to the carriers for an AWP (average wholesale price) of $ 450.00/unit and they start marketing it for $ 599 to $ 699 and a 2-year minimum contract of $ 50/month. There is a pile of money for everyone with those figures. The carriers can drop the up front price of the unit to zero and still make a bundle of cash on new/repeat contracts. Everybody is happy here and the value of the hardware business is its gross revenue difference, or, $ 450 - $ 280 = $ 170 x 16 million units. This number gives us a rough figure of $ 2.72 in Gross Profit per Units sold. Now of course there are a number of marketing costs, logistics costs and so on, but, it is fair to say that a company like Lenovo can reduce unit costs, Samsung could blend their marketing with that of BlackBerry handsets and IBM could easily sell handsets to enterprise and not incur losses at these margins. Did Nokia ever carry such a Gross Margin on their phones? No! It is easy to see a value of 1 X GP or $ 2.72 billion for the handset business. Now Economics 101 tells you to produce as many units of a product as you can sell until unit sales $$$ = unit costs $$$ (fixed costs in this case). So the new owner would look to sell even more of these handsets to lower their fixed costs and streamline the business model. So which is likely to happen? BlackBerry would be stupid to close the hardware business, they are likely to partner with Lenovo to have them assume the risk of hardware and continue to sell the phones under the BB label. Lenovo gets $ 400/unit and BB sells them wholesale for $ 400 plus. We continue to get BB's and BB gets out from under heavy commodity costs and workforce expense. Again, Lenovo would want to sell more units under this agreement and BB would become a software play with a hardware component. Remember, manufacturing is a 10% margin business, BlackBerry is offering many times this return and companies like that.

    Now, Nokia sold their mobile business plus patents licensing for $ 7.2 billion and all of that was low end margin stuff. BlackBerry has mobile, Enterprise, the best patents and the best OS out there today. Plus they can offer all of this with M2M. So does it make sense to close the hardware business, no. But let's assume you are Pac Crest, you need to report the fact that BlackBerry will pay $ 800 million to close the hardware business. Say you are the Wall Street Enquirer, you need to report that no deals are on the table. All of this is true but unlikely, you don't care, you are walking the fine line between inflating the problems of BlackBerry and barely telling the truth. Welcome to the distorted world of the media.

    BlackBerry can continue to make handsets, they just need to match supply and demand and be sure not to exceed allowable costs of marketing for their limited customer base. Ideally they would produce two phones, promote them to Enterprise and get BB 10.2 and BBM-X out so that a grey area of the retail consumer market, guys like me, want to own their product even though it isn't a corporate issued product in my case. Enterprise buys 16 million phones and the rest of us, say 10 million, like the product too. They make a bundle selling phones and buy time to make it more retail friendly. Closing the business and incurring costs is a Faucette thing, he is leaning on the stupid button because that is what he is paid to do. Prem/Heins/BB are looking at this from the going concern side of the business and know that $ 8.0 billion in revenues and a 40% gross margin is valuable to others. You decide which plan makes more sense.
    M+8, I appreciate your work here. I wish you could be on CNBC.

    Posted via CB10
    bungaboy, sidhuk, abouthsu and 3 others like this.
    09-15-13 12:39 PM
  5. sparkaction's Avatar
    M+8. Why are the events unfolding at BlackBerry appear so transparent to the media? For example, why did BlackBerry reiterate that they are looking at strategic alternatives when Prem left the board? This appears very unusual given how quietly MSFT "acquired" NOK and how quietly GOOG took over MOT.
    Last edited by sparkaction; 09-15-13 at 12:54 PM.
    09-15-13 12:41 PM
  6. bungaboy's Avatar
    This is some trivia. And interesting read. Kinda, sorta. LoL

    It may, however, give some hindsight into the hatred we still see.

    How BlackBerry Handled Past Wealth

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/23/bu...ewanted=1&_r=0

    By FLOYD NORRIS

    Published: August 22, 2013

    It started in an unlikely place, far from the headquarters of more established technology companies, and grew to become a dominant player. Along the way, investors piled in, undeterred by the company’s policy of never paying a dividend.

    But then the technology changed, and the company struggled to keep up. Eventually it realized it could not continue as it was. It was broken up and acquired, with investors receiving a fraction of what their shares had been worth at the peak.

    That was the story of the Digital Equipment Corporation, which was based in a former textile mill in Maynard, Mass., and became the second-largest computer company in the world in the 1980s. In 1998, it was acquired by Compaq, a maker of personal computers that had destroyed Digital’s business in mini computers. It proved to be a poor deal for Compaq, which itself was acquired later by Hewlett-Packard.

    A year before Digital was acquired, a small mobile technology company based in Waterloo, Ontario, went public on the Canadian market. In 1999, it listed on Nasdaq and became a phenomenon. It was called Research in Motion until this year, when its corporate name was changed to that of its primary product, BlackBerry.

    Now it seems as if BlackBerry will follow the Digital Equipment path. It has hired bankers to pursue its “strategic options,” and the expectation is that it will be acquired for its cash and patents while the product that made it rich and famous will gradually vanish.

    Digital left behind a large number of technology companies in Massachusetts, some of which flourished in the very mill that Digital made famous. BlackBerry’s impact on Waterloo seems likely to be similar.

    This column is not about the changing technology that caused the decline of BlackBerry, which by now is well known. Instead, it is about the way the company handled prosperity when profits were plentiful — a way that served BlackBerry executives well and that pleased Wall Street but provided no benefits to loyal shareholders.
    BlackBerry’s corporate filings show that over the years it distributed $3.5 billion to shareholders. (Although BlackBerry is based in Canada, it keeps its books in United States dollars and that number, like all others in this column, is in United States currency.) That is an impressive amount, especially considering that the entire company is now worth only a little more than $5 billion.

    But loyal shareholders did not receive any of that money. To get the money, an investor had to sell. The money was spent on share buybacks, and most of those buybacks came in 2008 and 2009, when the company was flying high.

    BlackBerry’s financial strategy was not particularly unusual, although it does stand out in the way it abused the rules on executive stock options. Perhaps it would never have paid dividends anyway, but those options gave the company’s executives good reasons to avoid dividends and concentrate on share buybacks.

    The result was a classic “sell low and buy high” strategy, one that did wonders for the executives.

    Over the years, BlackBerry executives and employees exercised options to acquire 83.3 million shares, adjusted for two stock splits. On average, they paid $4.38 a share.

    Those prices were, of course, well below the market value of the shares at the time. That is the way options work — or at least are supposed to work. The exercise price is equal to the market price when the options are issued, but the executive has up to 10 years to exercise them, and will do so only if the price has increased.

    One reason companies that issue a lot of options prefer stock buybacks to dividends is that while buybacks may raise the market value of the stock and thus increase the value of an outstanding option, dividends are less likely to do so. Option holders, unlike shareholders, do not benefit from dividends.

    Corporate managements like to say that options do not dilute shareholders’ stakes because the company acquires and retires an offsetting number of shares. BlackBerry did just that, buying 85.5 million shares that it canceled. It bought an additional 12.3 million shares that it did not cancel but held to provide stock to issue directly to executives.

    Over all, it paid an average of $36.10 for the shares it repurchased.

    The net effect: It took in $365 million from the exercise of options. It paid $3.5 billion to repurchase shares. Under accounting rules, that $3 billion difference had no effect on reported profits, but it had a big effect on the resources available to the company for other purposes, like spending on research and development.

    The incentive effects of option grants, as opposed to grants of actual shares, have long been debated. Options offer the possibility of large profits if the share price goes up, but might also expire, worthless, if the stock does not rise. Some critics argue that options may encourage executives to gamble with the company’s assets because they will lose no more if the company’s share price collapses than they would lose if it remained flat.

    Restricted stock grants, on the other hand, have less upside. They also have a continuing downside, because an executive holding such shares will stand to lose money as the stock price declines, even if it is already worth less than when it was issued. Some argue that does a better job of aligning executive interests with those of shareholders.

    In practice, companies tend to prefer options when they think the share price will rise, and restricted stock when they are not so confident.

    That is the way it worked at BlackBerry. The last large option grants to senior executives were made in October 2007. A year later, the stock price had peaked — at $148 in June 2008 — and was down to about $70. No options were granted. Instead, restricted stock units were issued.

    It may be that was coincidental. By then, BlackBerry and its top executives were up to their necks in investigations into the company’s options practices. The company eventually admitted that ever since 1998 — the year after it went public — the company’s top executives had been routinely backdating options to get exercise prices as low as possible and had lied about the practice to, among others, its auditors.

    In 2006, when the backdating scandal broke in the United States, the company piously denied it had done anything of the sort. A few months later, it had to admit it had lied. In the end, top executives surrendered a large number of options, and other options were re-priced. The Securities and Exchange Commission determined that more than 1,400 individual grants had been backdated.

    At least the executives were not doing that only for themselves. They also did it for new employees and others receiving grants. They seem to have done all they could to help out everyone involved.

    Except, of course, the shareholders.

    Any shareholder could have sold shares back when the company was buying, and no doubt many did. But the nature of stock options is that most, if not all, of the shares acquired when options are exercised are immediately sold. The executives certainly benefited from the purchases. Shareholders who believed in the company’s future did not.

    BlackBerry shares now trade around $10, up from around $9 before the company indicated it was looking for a buyer. While that price is way below the peak, it still represents a nice profit for any investor who bought when the company went public in 1997, although it is below the price paid when the company sold stock to the public in 2004.

    In BlackBerry’s defense, the buyback strategy was being recommended by most Wall Street firms for years, and the company, whose spokesman did not return a phone call seeking comment, no doubt received that advice from experts. And there is evidence that BlackBerry was particularly vulnerable to Wall Street wisdom. Before the credit crisis erupted, it had put cash into “safe” Wall Street recommendations like structured investment vehicles and auction-rate securities. It took losses on them, as well as on money that Lehman Brothers owed it when it collapsed.

    None of this explains BlackBerry’s fatal error, of not managing to be the company that figured out where technology was going. But it does explain why shareholders who believed in the company when times were good did not prosper as they might have.
    09-15-13 01:41 PM
  7. morganplus8's Avatar
    M+8. Why are the events unfolding at BlackBerry appear so transparent to the media? For example, why did BlackBerry reiterate that they are looking at strategic alternatives when Prem left the board? This appears very unusual given how quietly MSFT "acquired" NOK and how quietly GOOG took over MOT.
    sparkaction!!

    I honestly think Heins is pleased with how BB is transitioning into a mobile player once again. We have only one quarter worth of data to go on but I believe they felt the battle would be even more difficult in North America. Yet they are doing extremely well in Canada and abroad. Now pleasing the media is a whole other issue. My personal take on the media is that it is far more popular (clicks) to bash BlackBerry, then it is to promote the company. In addition, if you are the first to move on a topic, you get followers to quote you, so the Wall Street Enquirer is pumping out articles that have zero value almost every day. All the other media types quote them and create their own relevance on the topic. The Globe & Mail is famous for stealing ideas and pumping stories that have zero value. Jacquie McNish should know better than to even suggest she has some connection with Canada's Pension Funds. Yet we are know led to believe that they are cool to the idea of making money.

    Prem stepping down from the board was a huge event, he knows that, the board knows that, and thankfully, the media believe he stepped down to pursue the company. I believe that BlackBerry has some offer on the table, the offer is strong enough that Prem had to step down in order to free himself to sell his block in the open market, or possibly make a counter offer. He could do neither of those two moves without stepping away. If I owned as many shares as Mike and Prem do, I would have done the same thing. It is against the law to provide the media with any kind of information that is not available to the public. This is straight forward and the media knows this too. They skirt this issue by using logic, it goes like this, "well, we know nothing about the actions that BB will be taking or have taken, we don't have any sources to provide us with illegal information, therefore, we must place ourselves in their position and think of all of the possibilities here, and report the ones we like the most".

    They end up thinking that Prem, had to consider selling his stock, buying more stock, holding what he has and variations of the above. So Jacquie comes along and says that her article will include some Wall Street Enquirer stuff, and that reasoned "thought" that Prem might have considered selling his shares at one point. This is all part of the "what if" analysis that all companies go through every day. Heck, I thought of selling my block of stock many times too, Prem doesn't hold an exclusive right to that idea, I thought of selling those shares when they get to $ 30.00/shr.. Big deal.

    So to get back to your question, and the point you made about MSFT working quietly behind the scenes to acquire NOK, I believe a real buyer stepped forward and their offer is extremely friendly to BlackBerry, such that the board has to consider it. I also think that Mike and Prem have other ideas and they have enough shares to block any deal that is presented by this secret buyer. Prem cannot block a deal and sit on the board, he has to step outside the boardroom and state his reason why the company should go in a different direction. We had to wait for the board to get re-elected on July 9th, we had to wait for Heins to get his stock package and we had to wait for the breakup package to be voted on by the board. It took little time after that for Prem to step down, for the stock to pop up and for BB to announce a renewed interest in partnerships etc.. Why would it take much time for BB to ask for others to take a run at the company when they already have an interest? MSFT has a ton of cash, as do others, so I imagine that the company that approached them is after a "part" of the company at a price that makes it worth their while selling off almost everything. We will never know until it happens, the stock is setting up for some real news and we will see it rally hard, each day and then suddenly the reason for the rally will become apparent.

    You get to 52 week highs in the stock in short order ... this way, the stock rallies, investors question why, it continues to rally, many sell, it holds at over bought levels and then you know why is it up there. A standard 40% premium on $ 15.00/shr gets you to 52 week highs and all the media talks about is the generous 40% premium and not the rally before it. I don't believe Prem is trying to buy the company cheap, and, we aren't talking about much money here, when you buy stock on the way to making your offer, your average price for the stock is well below the final sales price.

    Finally, the company can't say anything, the players who signed BlackBerry's release forms for details of the financials can't say anything, and most Funds don't want to be in the news for breaking the law. Sources of information don't exist in 99% of these deals. When I was in the business, I had a rich client who called me one day while flying to his cottage with the CEO of a major oil company (oil companies' private helicopter), he told me the company was going to be purchased and the announcement would be out in 3 hours, he was right. The last thing I would do is tell anyone what I knew, or act upon it as I had already done a major purchase of Kaiser Resources just days before they were acquired. If I had two such deals on my books, I'd be up in front of the OSC/SEC!! If you have real information, and you are in the business, the last thing you want is for anyone else to know what you know. The media just play the "what if" game and perform selective reporting, followed by cut and paste. Sorry about the long winded explanation!

    One more thing: The board doesn't necessarily decide when to spring into action, the company making the offer to acquire their assets drives the board into action. I think the board was driven into action in this case.
    Last edited by morganplus8; 09-15-13 at 02:07 PM.
    09-15-13 01:56 PM
  8. notfanboy's Avatar
    sparkaction!!

    I honestly think Heins is pleased with how BB is transitioning into a mobile player once again. We have only one quarter worth of data to go on but I believe they felt the battle would be even more difficult in North America. Yet they are doing extremely well in Canada and abroad.
    Extremely well? Where's the data to support this? Because almost every report, including BlackBerry's own reported numbers are indicating the opposite.

    By the way I'd love to hear your prediction of the sales of BB10 devices for the last quarter. There's a friendly guessing game set up a few days back where a number of people participated.
    09-15-13 02:26 PM
  9. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    Extremely well? Where's the data to support this? Because almost every report, including BlackBerry's own reported numbers are indicating the opposite.

    By the way I'd love to hear your prediction of the sales of BB10 devices for the last quarter. There's a friendly guessing game set up a few days back where a number of people participated.
    There isn't a need for me to prove anything, but for what it's worth I also believe that things are going well for BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    09-15-13 02:31 PM
  10. cgk's Avatar
    So where do you fit on the list?

    • m0de25 1.75 million
    • Nquyen 1.8 million - EPS of -$-0.15
    • Chrysaurora 1.96 million - EPS of -$0.15
    • Andrew4life 2.0 million - EPS of - $0.56
    • lcjr 2.0 million
    • Khf227 2.1 million - EPS of -$0.25
    • ibpluto 2.2 million
    • Notfanboy 2.2 million
    • OMGitworks 2.2 Million
    • CGK 2.3 million
    • Bugmapper 2.4 million - EPS of -$0.10
    • Randeman 2.41 millon
    • Abouthsu 2.5 million
    • Kid Vibe 2.5 million
    • Gesig Boek 2.7 million
    • Chris2J 3.0 million
    • Superfly_FR 3.0 million
    • Sidhuk 3.0 million
    • Bungaboy 3.15 million - EPS of -$0.12
    • Komoto 3.2 million
    • Cjcampbell 3.7 million
    • Morganplus8 3.7 million
    • Morlock_man 4.0 million
    • Herol 5.5 million
    • Shanerredflag 7.5 million
    Last edited by cgk; 09-15-13 at 03:34 PM. Reason: added morganplus
    09-15-13 02:42 PM
  11. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    So where do you fit on the list?
    I tried to come up with a number when you first started the list, but lacked sufficient data to do so.

    Posted via CB10
    09-15-13 02:51 PM
  12. notfanboy's Avatar
    There isn't a need for me to prove anything, but for what it's worth I also believe that things are going well for BlackBerry.
    I tried to come up with a number when you first started the list, but lacked sufficient data to do so.
    These two consecutive posts are quite remarkable. The first post speaks of belief and is a declaration of not needing proof. The second post refers to needing data before participating in a friendly zero-consequence guessing game.

    If you were to base it on just your belief, could you come up with a guess?
    gg22 likes this.
    09-15-13 02:59 PM
  13. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    These two consecutive posts are quite remarkable. The first post speaks of belief and is a declaration of not needing proof. The second post refers to needing data before participating in a friendly zero-consequence guessing game.

    If you were to base it on just your belief, could you come up with a guess?
    No, it just means that I don't want to provide a number that has no relevance. Your guess is as good as mine.

    Posted via CB10
    09-15-13 03:07 PM
  14. morganplus8's Avatar
    There isn't a need for me to prove anything, but for what it's worth I also believe that things are going well for BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    plasmid_boy,

    The two guys you are arguing with, I have on ignore.

    I guess launching BB 10 OS, BES10.1, selling 3.7 million BB 10 phones from February to June, gaining the only DoD approved solution, cash at $ 3.1 billion, suitors wanting a piece of BlackBerry, security beyond the reach of NSA, BBM-X submitted to iTunes and launched with Android/Samsung, numerous hardware products coming to market, massive worldwide carrier support even after few new products in 2-years, the list goes on ............................ clearly this isn't the same level of innovation that Apple showed us last week with their coloured phones.
    bungaboy, zyben, rarsen and 10 others like this.
    09-15-13 03:12 PM
  15. notfanboy's Avatar
    No, it just means that I don't want to provide a number that has no relevance. Your guess is as good as mine.
    I disagree. One of the guesses above will be closest to the reported shipping numbers.

    Look, you already stated your belief that things are going well for BlackBerry. Last ER, BB shipped 2.7 million BB10 devices. What does "going well" mean when you used the phrase? Does "going well" imply that they improved on 2.7, or can things also go well for them if they sell less than 2.7?
    09-15-13 03:14 PM
  16. bungaboy's Avatar
    I have had chronic **** disturbers on ignore for quite a while now.

    When I want to read **** I just go to the other threads. There is plenty out there by the same crowd.
    09-15-13 03:22 PM
  17. theRock1975's Avatar
    Please add me to the Q2 estimate list:

    6.0 m BB10
    Revenue up 25% from Q1
    Small loss for the quarter (0.15)

    TheRock

    Posted via CB10
    09-15-13 03:37 PM
  18. m0de25's Avatar
    So where do you fit on the list?

    • m0de25 1.75 million
    • Nquyen 1.8 million - EPS of -$-0.15
    • Chrysaurora 1.96 million - EPS of -$0.15
    • Andrew4life 2.0 million - EPS of - $0.56
    • lcjr 2.0 million
    • Khf227 2.1 million - EPS of -$0.25
    • ibpluto 2.2 million
    • Notfanboy 2.2 million
    • OMGitworks 2.2 Million
    • CGK 2.3 million
    • Bugmapper 2.4 million - EPS of -$0.10
    • Randeman 2.41 millon
    • Abouthsu 2.5 million
    • Kid Vibe 2.5 million
    • Gesig Boek 2.7 million
    • Chris2J 3.0 million
    • Superfly_FR 3.0 million
    • Sidhuk 3.0 million
    • Bungaboy 3.15 million - EPS of -$0.12
    • Komoto 3.2 million
    • Cjcampbell 3.7 million
    • Morganplus8 3.7 million
    • Morlock_man 4.0 million
    • Herol 5.5 million
    • Shanerredflag 7.5 million
    It's lonely at the top :P
    09-15-13 03:39 PM
  19. cgk's Avatar
    Please add me to the Q2 estimate list:

    6.0 m BB10
    Revenue up 25% from Q1
    Small loss for the quarter (0.15)

    TheRock

    Posted via CB10
    added:

    • m0de25 1.75 million
    • Nquyen 1.8 million - EPS of -$-0.15
    • Chrysaurora 1.96 million - EPS of -$0.15
    • Andrew4life 2.0 million - EPS of - $0.56
    • lcjr 2.0 million
    • Khf227 2.1 million - EPS of -$0.25
    • ibpluto 2.2 million
    • Notfanboy 2.2 million
    • OMGitworks 2.2 Million
    • CGK 2.3 million
    • Bugmapper 2.4 million - EPS of -$0.10
    • Randeman 2.41 millon
    • Abouthsu 2.5 million
    • Kid Vibe 2.5 million
    • Gesig Boek 2.7 million
    • Chris2J 3.0 million
    • Superfly_FR 3.0 million
    • Sidhuk 3.0 million
    • Bungaboy 3.15 million - EPS of -$0.12
    • Komoto 3.2 million
    • Focusedberry 3.4 million
    • Cjcampbell 3.7 million
    • Morganplus8 3.7 million
    • Morlock_man 4.0 million
    • Herol 5.5 million
    • The Rock 6.0 million - EPS of -$0.15
    • Shanerredflag 7.5 million
    Last edited by cgk; 09-15-13 at 04:23 PM.
    theRock1975 likes this.
    09-15-13 03:39 PM
  20. sidhuk's Avatar
    According to an UnNamed Source. Z30 will sell well, and I agree.
    5million Z30's before January 2014
    BlackBerry Z30 gets lined up next to the Sony Xperia Z1 | CrackBerry.com
    09-15-13 03:49 PM
  21. plasmid_boy's Avatar
    I disagree. One of the guesses above will be closest to the reported shipping numbers.

    Look, you already stated your belief that things are going well for BlackBerry. Last ER, BB shipped 2.7 million BB10 devices. What does "going well" mean when you used the phrase? Does "going well" imply that they improved on 2.7, or can things also go well for them if they sell less than 2.7?
    So, you disagree that I don't want to play the game?


    Posted via CB10
    09-15-13 03:57 PM
  22. Bugmapper's Avatar
    According to an UnNamed Source. Z30 will sell well, and I agree.
    5million Z30's before January 2014
    BlackBerry Z30 gets lined up next to the Sony Xperia Z1 | CrackBerry.com
    Thanks for fixing your avatar.

    Posted via CB10 on a Z10 root device!
    09-15-13 04:00 PM
  23. cgk's Avatar
    The BBRY Café.  [Formerly: I support BBRY and I buy shares]-capture.png

    Average 3.02 million
    Mode 2.20 million
    Median 2.50 million
    09-15-13 04:03 PM
  24. sparkaction's Avatar
    The million dollar question is what the street is expecting sales of BB10 devices to be? This will heavily influence the SP on Sept 27.
    Kid Vibe likes this.
    09-15-13 04:05 PM
  25. cgk's Avatar
    Nearer the time, if we add in the estimates of the street - interesting to see how close we were or away...
    09-15-13 04:09 PM
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