View Poll Results: Did you buy shares ?

Voters
1106. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I'm acting now !

    693 62.66%
  • No

    413 37.34%
  1. EastCoast17's Avatar
    The numbers we'll see this fiscal quarter will reflect initial carrier orders and things like the increased orders we've heard about based on early demand.

    Next fiscal quarter we'll see numbers actually driven by (but not directly reflecting) consumer purchases.
    Does anyone have any reliable information as to the approximate number of per-ordered units by the Canadian carriers?
    01-27-13 08:32 AM
  2. morganplus8's Avatar
    MorganPlus8, I was wondering if you could clear up some basic problems I am having understanding call options.
    If I have an option that expires on Sept 21, 2013 and I want to exercise that option, what happens?
    How do I pay for it if I am just leveraging and putting the premium up? Do I have to turn around and sell it immediately?
    Is there a cost to doing it that way? What I mean is, is there another fee to turn around and sell it?
    Hi timmy t,

    Sorry for the delay in getting to your question so here goes! When you setup an account and start to trade, you check off the types of trades you would like to do in your account, one of those is the ablility to write/buy options. Your broker will recommend a margin account so that you have the ability to exercise call options or have written puts assigned to you. They won't let you write puts unless your account is setup to receive instant purchases. In any case, they will have a policy on whether you can exercise call options and generate debt owing to your account. From the time that you exercise options, you have a settlement date which is the date that your margined/un-margined account must be settled with the minimum amount of caht placed in it. And so it makes sense to setup your trading account with margin for borrowing of brokerage funds as needed.

    If we assume you have the proper account, you are now flexible enough to handle various trade settlements with ease. If the stock you wanted trades for $ 10.00 you have several ways to acquire that position. If the amount of shares to be purchased is 1,000, you can buy and pay for them for $ 10,000 cash. With margin, you can hold the stock by placing as little as 30% down or $ 3,000 and paying and maintaining the other $ 7,000 on credit from the brokerage firm. Now, with options, 1 option represents 100 shares so you are looking at 10 options to control 1,000 in this example. Options are noted for time premiums and time decay, you need to undershand that market making in options produce these two features about them. Time is money and equates to risk and if you want to control 10 options worth of stock, you are going to have to pay a premium for that right. The seller wants to earn a yield on their investment for the right to let you control their stock. That premium is determined by the "beta" or the stocks' volatility, a high beta stock might trade between $ 6.00 - $ 16.00 or a period of 6 months or less making it far more likely that the seller of a call option will end up losing their stock, thus, they want a higher premium to allow you to own their calls. All of this premium decays away until on the final day of trading in that series, when the risk factor is taken away and the option is at the market price for the stock. If the option strike price is out of the money, the option is worthless. If the option is in the money, it is worth the difference between the strike price and the current price of the stock on the expiry date.

    Back to our example, You buy 10 call options on Stock XXX at a $ 10.00 strike price with the stock at $ 10.00 and you take the length of time to expiry all the way out to 10 months from now for reasons that you feel will leverage your investment and make more money. If you are right, and the stock does extremely well, the stock price will trade up and your options will follow. Initially, the stock price trades at a greater rate than the option until the option is deep in the money. And so if the stock trades to $ 11.00, your option might only go up $ .80/call, but at some point as it gets deep in the money, your option mimics the stock on a 1:1 ratio.

    The reason for all of this prep work here is is to answer your question about exercising an option early. If you exercise the option early, you chance losing the time premium that is left in the trade. That portion of the trade where there is risk still attached to the trade. You could buy the stock for $ 13.50/shr in the open market but your option still has time premium attached to it and worth $ 14.00, via the current bid and ask of the $ 10.00 strike at $ 3.90 - $ 4.10. You should consider selling the call option for $ 4.00 and use that money to buy the stock in the open market like everyone one else at $ 13.50/shr. If you use a full service broker, or some electronic traders that allow both trades pinned to a duel outcome, you could request a pairs trade with a $ .50/premium or, buy the stock ... "only if" you sell the option for a $ .50/difference. It is rare that anyone exercises options prior to expiry, they sell them and take the premium too, or, they hold them and take up the underlying stock. To do both is not uncommon when they are in the money, and when they are deep in the money, it makes sense to take up the stock knowing the price of the option received will cover the 30% margin requirement of your broker.

    I'll let you digest this before I continue, but to answer your question, you need to factor in commisions for both trades and look at the likelihood of getting your premium on those options. Pfizer isn't a problem because of the volumes involved but many other trades involve bid/ask spreads that are not certain to work out well. Hope this helps!
    01-27-13 09:21 AM
  3. silversun10's Avatar
    01-27-13 09:51 AM
  4. timmy t's Avatar
    Thank you very much, morganplus8. I will read it and re-read it . This is just what I was looking for.
    So, in order for me to buy call options, do I have to have 30% of the executed amount (I'm sure that is not the correct terminology) in the bank when I actually buy the options (not including the premium) and have an account that is set up to do margin trading?
    So before I buy a call option for 1,000 shares at $10, do I have to have $3,000.00 in the account plus the premium?
    And do I have to have my account set up to be a margin account or can I just sell the options before they expire?
    When I first set up the account, I told them I wasn't planning on doing margin trading so I would have to go back and get that changed if that was the case.
    Also, I assume you probably can't do margin trading within any retirement accounts (Canadian, in my case).
    01-27-13 10:44 AM
  5. cleacy's Avatar
    Thank you very much, morganplus8. I will read it and re-read it . This is just what I was looking for.
    So, in order for me to buy call options, do I have to have 30% of the executed amount (I'm sure that is not the correct terminology) in the bank when I actually buy the options (not including the premium) and have an account that is set up to do margin trading?
    So before I buy a call option for 1,000 shares at $10, do I have to have $3,000.00 in the account plus the premium?
    And do I have to have my account set up to be a margin account or can I just sell the options before they expire?
    When I first set up the account, I told them I wasn't planning on doing margin trading so I would have to go back and get that changed if that was the case.
    Also, I assume you probably can't do margin trading within any retirement accounts (Canadian, in my case).
    Options typically sell in blocks of 100. Let's assume the call you're referring to is currently selling at $1 at the $10 strike. If you wanted to option 1000 shares, you'd purchase 10 calls at a cost of $1x100x10= $1000, plus whatever the commission on the trade is (we'll assume $25), for a total cost of $1025. To make the trade would require available cash of $1025. As of just before expiry, we'll assume the price of the underlying security is trading at $15. The option would likely be selling at that time for ~$5.25. Your choice then is to either sell the options at $5.25x100x10 less $25 commission = $5225, or make sure you have available cash or margin for a $10x1000+ commission = $10,025 purchase.- Or some combination of that.

    You can't margin trade within a retirement account.

    Purchasing an option is much less expensive then exercising it.
    Last edited by cleacy; 01-27-13 at 11:34 AM.
    01-27-13 11:18 AM
  6. timmy t's Avatar
    Options typically sell in blocks of 100. Let's assume the call you're referring to is currently selling at $1 at the $10 strike. If you wanted to option 1000 shares, you'd purchase 10 calls at a cost of $1x100x10= $1000, plus whatever the commission on the trade is (we'll assume $25), for a total cost of $1025. To make the trade would require available cash of $1025. As of just before expiry, we'll assume the price of the underlying security is trading at $15. The option would likely be selling at that time for ~$5.25. Your choice then is to either sell the options at $5.25x100x10 less $25 commission = $5225, or make sure you have available cash or margin for a $10x1000+ commission = $10,025 purchase.- Or some combination of that.

    You can't margin trade within a retirement account.

    Purchasing an option is much less expensive then exercising it.
    So I just have to have enough to purchase the options at the time of purchase. I can have my account changed to a margin account at a future date, I would assume? Or sell the options and take the cash.
    01-27-13 11:41 AM
  7. timmy t's Avatar
    If I am long term bullish, would it make more sense to buy options that expire in Jan 2015 instead. I know it costs more for the premium but you are buying 4 times (compared to a Sept 2013 expiration date) the time for it to grow.
    01-27-13 11:45 AM
  8. cleacy's Avatar
    If I am long term bullish, would it make more sense to buy options that expire in Jan 2015 instead. I know it costs more for the premium but you are buying 4 times (compared to a Sept 2013 expiration date) the time for it to grow.
    Options are for trading/or hedging, not investing: It is basically an all or nothing trade. In the short term especially, they are very risky. Anything can happen in the short term. Regardless of the underlying fundamentals, in the short term the market can (and will) do anything. They do allow for leveraging money quite dramatically, but if you're buying them, you can lose the full amount of your investment in them. Writing them on the other hand you have the potential for unlimited loss.

    Re-reading my post... This probably needs some sort of disclaimer: It should not be taken as investment advice.
    Last edited by cleacy; 01-27-13 at 12:26 PM.
    morganplus8 and Superfly_FR like this.
    01-27-13 12:08 PM
  9. morganplus8's Avatar
    Thank you very much, morganplus8. I will read it and re-read it . This is just what I was looking for.
    So, in order for me to buy call options, do I have to have 30% of the executed amount (I'm sure that is not the correct terminology) in the bank when I actually buy the options (not including the premium) and have an account that is set up to do margin trading?
    So before I buy a call option for 1,000 shares at $10, do I have to have $3,000.00 in the account plus the premium?
    And do I have to have my account set up to be a margin account or can I just sell the options before they expire?
    When I first set up the account, I told them I wasn't planning on doing margin trading so I would have to go back and get that changed if that was the case.
    Also, I assume you probably can't do margin trading within any retirement accounts (Canadian, in my case).
    Thank you, glad I could help as this is an intense topic. As risky as options are, you have to pay for them when you place the trade so if you purchase 10 options on RIM, you have to pay the full amount up front plus commissions. You can setup an account that limits you to buying and selling options much like stock, or, you can include margin or the help of the brokerage for financing and that allows you to carry stock on loan. The 30% is usually a required minimum, I say this because when RIM started its free fall, brokers demanded as high as 75% capital in order to borrow 25% from them. So you can imagine the shock when they call you asking for more money to hold the position even though it is close to your purchase price.

    You can sell the options before they expire at the current market value. If the stock is through the strike price but your account isn't setup to take the stock, you will get "settled" and the proceeds will be deposited in your account upon expiry. No you can't do margin trading in a registered account simply because you would be changing the taxable or liable amount of the fund without depositing or withdrawing funds. There has to be a proper paper trail in those accounts showing contributed amounts only. So feel free to open a margin account, but do know that you are leveraging yourself not unlike those who bought houses with no money down. Please be careful!

    As a side note:
    I rarely buy calls or puts, I write or sell both to others to take their money. The reason is the risk involved in owning time premium investments if they don't work out for you. I have made an exception in this case and own RIM Feb $ 14.00 Calls, about 160 of them as I like the story here. That doesn't mean I'm safe and will see the money back, even though they are well in the money as of Friday, so be careful. I should mention I paid $ .53/option for them and might sell them on a pop, and purchase at the money calls, as a replacement trade going into the launch.
    bungaboy and Shanerredflag like this.
    01-27-13 12:55 PM
  10. Andrew4life's Avatar
    If I am long term bullish, would it make more sense to buy options that expire in Jan 2015 instead. I know it costs more for the premium but you are buying 4 times (compared to a Sept 2013 expiration date) the time for it to grow.

    Options are for trading/or hedging, not investing: It is basically an all or nothing trade. In the short term especially, they are very risky. Anything can happen in the short term. Regardless of the underlying fundamentals, in the short term the market can (and will) do anything. They do allow for leveraging money quite dramatically, but if you're buying them, you can lose the full amount of your investment in them. Writing them on the other hand you have the potential for unlimited loss.

    Re-reading my post... This probably needs some sort of disclaimer: It should not be taken as investment advice.
    Well, like cleacy has said, it's usually used for trading/hedging, but .................. when done right, can be a way make the most money.
    (Not that I recommend it or not. The below info is just that, purely for informational purposes.)

    So for example, say you buy January 2015 $20 calls for $5 an option(when I say $5 I really mean $5/share or $500/option). If the stock raises above $25, anything above that is pure gains. If the stock is below $15, the maximum you lose is the cost of the options, so say the stock ends up being $10, well, you lost $5 per share (your option price) compared to $10 a share, if you were to buy the stock for $20.
    So if the stock is below $15 or above $25, then your option purchase was a good purchase. (Note: Even though you are actually losing money if the stock is below $15, your loss is less than if you bought the stock)

    The problem lies where the stock trades in the range of $15-$25 at the expiry date. Basically, anywhere within this range, you will have a loss of $5 (the cost of your options).It's as if you bought the stock at $20, and you were forced to sell at $15. If you do exercise your options(which would only make sense if the stock was above $20), it would be as if you purchased the stock for $20, so now your loss is $25 less the expiry stock price. But of course if you put a lot of money into options, you're not likely to have the money to exercise all your options, so you'll more than likely have just lost the cost of your options $5. If you decided to put $50,000 into buying these options(e.g. 100 options), you would lose ALL of your $50,000 at expiry!!

    Hopefully that was not too confusing.

    To be honest, I've been thinking of a strategy like this (small amounts, maybe 5 options). Because in 2 years, the landscape will really change, and BlackBerry is likely going to be great! Price >$25, or not so great....Price <$15. It's probably not going to be just mediocre.

    Edit: THIS POST IS NOT TO BE TAKEN AS FINANCIAL INVESTMENT ADVICE. It is more akin to GAMBLING!
    Last edited by Andrew4life; 01-27-13 at 01:15 PM.
    01-27-13 12:59 PM
  11. TomJasper's Avatar
    I'm going to try and nip this in the bud.
    Timmy, Don't take this personal in the least, it is not meant to be.

    I would seriously suggest you sit down with a QUALIFIED broker, even if there is a slight cost for same. You keep asking for advice on this thread and many have tried to give you enough info to help you along,yet even after such you ask more advice. I'm seriously concerned that if you come out on a bad trade it will not reflect well and it may open some up to unwanted legal ramifications. I'm not sure what bank you deal with but I'm sure they will/can help you. Again , I'm not trying to be an azz, just don't want to see you on the wrong side of a trade or others being liable simply for trying to help ya out.


    If I am long term bullish, would it make more sense to buy options that expire in Jan 2015 instead. I know it costs more for the premium but you are buying 4 times (compared to a Sept 2013 expiration date) the time for it to grow.
    01-27-13 12:59 PM
  12. BB Fightclub's Avatar
    Back to the short position talk. It looks to me like all this shorting has another purpose - someone is shorting RIM, then buying an equal number of shares and just sitting on them. Now they have some cash in hand, have to pay a small fee to maintain the short, and have control a bunch of stock. The future price has no bearing as they are dollar neutral (both long and short). What's the point? The voting rights are now with the new owner, the guy who unknowingly loaned out the shares lost them. The cost is minimal and there is no risk. Now what? (I'm not a finance or business guy - so a llittle help?)
    1. Hostil takeover? If a company has voting rights for say 100 million shares of RIM, and they gain control of another 163 million through partnerships, options or buying on the open market, and get 51% can then then vote to buy RIM at a 20% to 40% premium? Like $22.....I'd be choked.
    2. RIM insiders are collecting these voting rights to stop a takeover and reduce the pool of shares eligable for loaning.
    3. RIM insiders are planning on going private?????? I'd be really choked if I got bought out at $22 and RIM went on to generate 100s of billions in revenue. No f'ing way would I be buying anything from BB.
    4. Maybe they are legitimate shorts....pretty ballsy.... if RIM pops $10, thats $1.4 billion in losses.
    So - to stop aholes from shorting your stock ....put it up for sale, tranfer it to RRSP, ask for certificate. The big boys are in total control, but at least you will know you did your part.
    bungaboy, fedakd and TomJasper like this.
    01-27-13 01:17 PM
  13. timmy t's Avatar
    Yes, it is intense but I am starting to get the very basics. Obviously, there are a lot of factors that I don't understand but I am getting the gist of things. Thank you for explaining it and not getting upset if I don't get it the first time.

    Here is what I am thinking now. I know it is risky to do this but just buying RIM shares is risky too as it sometimes swings up and down one or two dollars a day, even down $3 after the last quarterly report. I bought a lot of shares at an average of around $8.15 so I am well up on that.

    With the maximum downside being the premium and the upside being $50 or more (after one year) if Misek it to be believed, it seems that it has much more upside than downsize.
    With Misek (for what it is worth) saying there is a 30% chance of it reaching as much as $58/share in one year, that would be basically a 1 in 3 chance of making over $25/share ($20 strike price and $4.20 premium).
    That is $28,800.00 on ~$4,200.00 of premiums for 1,000 shares which would expire in about 1 year.
    So if I sell these options and make that money, do I get taxed on that during that tax year even if I buy some more options?
    How would the, for lack of a better word, churning, affect the taxes you have to pay? Would I pay less taxes if I just bought the options and executed the call options only once in two years, for instance?
    01-27-13 01:30 PM
  14. TomJasper's Avatar
    I pick door number 4.

    Cheers to shorts getting fried and cheers to Jan.30.2013 Thor 8th round KO to the naysayers and cheers to Blackberry 10 Super Bowl ad!
    Back to the short position talk. It looks to me like all this shorting has another purpose - someone is shorting RIM, then buying an equal number of shares and just sitting on them. Now they have some cash in hand, have to pay a small fee to maintain the short, and have control a bunch of stock. The future price has no bearing as they are dollar neutral (both long and short). What's the point? The voting rights are now with the new owner, the guy who unknowingly loaned out the shares lost them. The cost is minimal and there is no risk. Now what? (I'm not a finance or business guy - so a llittle help?)
    1. Hostil takeover? If a company has voting rights for say 100 million shares of RIM, and they gain control of another 163 million through partnerships, options or buying on the open market, and get 51% can then then vote to buy RIM at a 20% to 40% premium? Like $22.....I'd be choked.
    2. RIM insiders are collecting these voting rights to stop a takeover and reduce the pool of shares eligable for loaning.
    3. RIM insiders are planning on going private?????? I'd be really choked if I got bought out at $22 and RIM went on to generate 100s of billions in revenue. No f'ing way would I be buying anything from BB.
    4. Maybe they are legitimate shorts....pretty ballsy.... if RIM pops $10, thats $1.4 billion in losses.
    So - to stop aholes from shorting your stock ....put it up for sale, tranfer it to RRSP, ask for certificate. The big boys are in total control, but at least you will know you did your part.
    bungaboy likes this.
    01-27-13 01:39 PM
  15. bungaboy's Avatar
    I'm going to try and nip this in the bud.
    Timmy, Don't take this personal in the least, it is not meant to be.

    I would seriously suggest you sit down with a QUALIFIED broker, even if there is a slight cost for same. You keep asking for advice on this thread and many have tried to give you enough info to help you along,yet even after such you ask more advice. I'm seriously concerned that if you come out on a bad trade it will not reflect well and it may open some up to unwanted legal ramifications. I'm not sure what bank you deal with but I'm sure they will/can help you. Again , I'm not trying to be an azz, just don't want to see you on the wrong side of a trade or others being liable simply for trying to help ya out.
    AKA . . . . . timmy, the advice you are getting is worth what you paid for it. LoL

    Thanks for asking the questions and thanks to those who provided the answers. I am learning a lot from this as well.
    robkd likes this.
    01-27-13 02:09 PM
  16. Andrew4life's Avatar
    Yes, it is intense but I am starting to get the very basics. Obviously, there are a lot of factors that I don't understand but I am getting the gist of things. Thank you for explaining it and not getting upset if I don't get it the first time.

    Here is what I am thinking now. I know it is risky to do this but just buying RIM shares is risky too as it sometimes swings up and down one or two dollars a day, even down $3 after the last quarterly report. I bought a lot of shares at an average of around $8.15 so I am well up on that.

    With the maximum downside being the premium and the upside being $50 or more (after one year) if Misek it to be believed, it seems that it has much more upside than downsize.
    With Misek (for what it is worth) saying there is a 30% chance of it reaching as much as $58/share in one year, that would be basically a 1 in 3 chance of making over $25/share ($20 strike price and $4.20 premium).
    That is $28,800.00 on ~$4,200.00 of premiums for 1,000 shares which would expire in about 1 year.
    So if I sell these options and make that money, do I get taxed on that during that tax year even if I buy some more options?
    How would the, for lack of a better word, churning, affect the taxes you have to pay? Would I pay less taxes if I just bought the options and executed the call options only once in two years, for instance?
    http://www.taxtips.ca/personaltax/in...nt/options.htm
    01-27-13 02:11 PM
  17. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    Back to the short position talk.
    So - to stop aholes from shorting your stock ....put it up for sale, tranfer it to RRSP, ask for certificate. The big boys are in total control, but at least you will know you did your part.
    Concur...come on everyone...join the 105.00 club, at least your making a ton if someone wants to exercise it. (I did a 28 day sell at 105.00 last week).
    Last edited by Shanerredflag; 01-27-13 at 02:29 PM. Reason: Grammer
    01-27-13 02:11 PM
  18. silversun10's Avatar
    Yes, it is intense but I am starting to get the very basics. Obviously, there are a lot of factors that I don't understand but I am getting the gist of things. Thank you for explaining it and not getting upset if I don't get it the first time.

    Here is what I am thinking now. I know it is risky to do this but just buying RIM shares is risky too as it sometimes swings up and down one or two dollars a day, even down $3 after the last quarterly report. I bought a lot of shares at an average of around $8.15 so I am well up on that.

    With the maximum downside being the premium and the upside being $50 or more (after one year) if Misek it to be believed, it seems that it has much more upside than downsize.
    With Misek (for what it is worth) saying there is a 30% chance of it reaching as much as $58/share in one year, that would be basically a 1 in 3 chance of making over $25/share ($20 strike price and $4.20 premium).
    That is $28,800.00 on ~$4,200.00 of premiums for 1,000 shares which would expire in about 1 year.
    So if I sell these options and make that money, do I get taxed on that during that tax year even if I buy some more options?
    How would the, for lack of a better word, churning, affect the taxes you have to pay? Would I pay less taxes if I just bought the options and executed the call options only once in two years, for instance?
    if you are new to this options game chances are this will get a bad ending even if RIM does well.
    you don't know how you are going to react to volatility, especially not if you put a lot of money
    at risk. the only way is to risk a small amount of money and to enjoy the ride,
    if you get greedy and gamble a lot your emotions will get the better of you and you can't win...
    and if you make money don't worry about taxes, the more the better...
    robkd likes this.
    01-27-13 02:27 PM
  19. timmy t's Avatar
    I'm going to try and nip this in the bud.
    Timmy, Don't take this personal in the least, it is not meant to be.

    I would seriously suggest you sit down with a QUALIFIED broker, even if there is a slight cost for same. You keep asking for advice on this thread and many have tried to give you enough info to help you along,yet even after such you ask more advice. I'm seriously concerned that if you come out on a bad trade it will not reflect well and it may open some up to unwanted legal ramifications. I'm not sure what bank you deal with but I'm sure they will/can help you. Again , I'm not trying to be an azz, just don't want to see you on the wrong side of a trade or others being liable simply for trying to help ya out.
    Thanks Tom. I'm up 100% already so don't feel too worried about me.
    I'm not asking for advice, I'm asking about how things work. I am trying to learn about stock options and the topic came up in this thread. I want to make sure I understand it before I do anything else.
    Doesn't that make sense to you?
    Last edited by timmy t; 01-27-13 at 02:44 PM.
    01-27-13 02:33 PM
  20. BBNation's Avatar
    I hope the stock does not tank lilke it did after earning. I am expecting it to to hit $20 bucks by friday if launch is good but if it's not then..god knows. The AND SHORTS will be looking for any small mistake to criticise it. If all go well, then expect short squeeze like NetFlix and it should hit mid 30s..
    Has anyone been following NetFlix lately. From 60 to 160s in few months..Hedge fund managers went long for Apple and suggested it will hit $1100 and went short for NetFlix saying it's dead..well they paid dearly..they have 2 days to cover their shorts at this price. If longs can push it $25, expect the squeeze that will take it to mid 30s easily..1/3 of stocks are short now..
    01-27-13 03:00 PM
  21. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    I pick door number 4.

    Cheers to shorts getting fried and cheers to Jan.30.2013 Thor 8th round KO to the naysayers and cheers to Blackberry 10 Super Bowl ad!
    [QUOTE=timmy t;7890337]Thanks Tom. I'm up 100% already so don't feel too worried about me.
    I'm not asking for advice, I'm asking about how things work. I am trying to learn about stock options and the topic came up in this thread. I want to make sure I understand it before I do anything else.
    Doesn't that make sense to you?[/QUOTE

    LOL...hey, I caught that edit.
    01-27-13 03:04 PM
  22. TomJasper's Avatar
    I have to wonder, will Iain Marlow have the grace to write an apology letter Jan.30.2013 ,the guy has been working over time since news of Blackberry 10 Super Bowl ad news. Some are soooooo transparent,lol.
    bungaboy likes this.
    01-27-13 03:09 PM
  23. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    I hope the stock does not tank lilke it did after earning. I am expecting it to to hit $20 bucks by friday if launch is good but if it's not then..god knows. I know media AND SHORTS will be lookin for any small mistake to criticise it. If all go well, then expect short squeeze like NetFlix and it should hit mid 30s..
    Has anyone been following NetFlix lately. From 60 to 160s in few months..Hedge fund managers went long went for Apple and went short for NetFlix..paid dearly..they have 2 days to cover their shorts at this price. If longs can push it $25, expect the squeeze that will take it to mid 30s easily..1/3 of stocks are short now
    Just casually watching....more interested now though, do you happen to know the percentage of shorts to market on that one before the SQEEZE hit?
    01-27-13 03:10 PM
  24. StormieTwo's Avatar
    Hear Here.

    So if everybody on this forum were to put thier shares for sale at say $105/shr (is that even possible?) then those shares come out of the float and the shorts have to start paying more to cover and the infinite loop starts to set up. I'm going to do that right now. come on short squeeze!


    I hope the stock does not tank lilke it did after earning. I am expecting it to to hit $20 bucks by friday if launch is good but if it's not then..god knows. I know media AND SHORTS will be lookin for any small mistake to criticise it. If all go well, then expect short squeeze like NetFlix and it should hit mid 30s..
    Has anyone been following NetFlix lately. From 60 to 160s in few months..Hedge fund managers went long went for Apple and went short for NetFlix..paid dearly..they have 2 days to cover their shorts at this price. If longs can push it $25, expect the squeeze that will take it to mid 30s easily..1/3 of stocks are short now
    Shanerredflag likes this.
    01-27-13 03:13 PM
  25. Shanerredflag's Avatar
    I have to wonder, will Iain Marlow have the grace to write an apology letter Jan.30.2013 ,the guy has been working over time since news of Blackberry 10 Super Bowl ad news. Some are soooooo transparent,lol.
    I think he's more likely to write how he was just playing devils advocate...looking out for investors interests. Lol
    01-27-13 03:25 PM
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