1. boydude's Avatar
    when charging my bold with usb i get 500ma and when pluging the usb cable in i get 1350ma.


    how comes the charging voltage is different but using same cable?
    09-23-09 01:41 PM
  2. robertleehadley's Avatar
    I don't understand :?
    09-23-09 02:35 PM
  3. boydude's Avatar
    charging rates via the engineer menu
    09-23-09 02:38 PM
  4. lordcliff's Avatar
    Do you mean 1350 when plugged into wall and 500 when plugged into the computer? If so I would say the wall charger is set at that amperage. The computer USB is probably lower since most devices don't need that much juice.

    If something is different, I don't know.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 03:14 PM
  5. Giant's Avatar
    Do you mean 1350 when plugged into wall and 500 when plugged into the computer? If so I would say the wall charger is set at that amperage. The computer USB is probably lower since most devices don't need that much juice.

    If something is different, I don't know.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Yay, another chance to show off my USB knowledge!

    Basically the reason has to do with the specifications of the USB protocal. A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0 There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, high-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. Your blackberry is a high power device, and therefore should be drawing a maximum of 500 mA.

    However, with the Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub charger can supply maximum 1.5 A when communicating at low-speed or full-speed, maximum 900 mA when communicating at hi-speed, no upper current limit when no communication is taking place. A dedicated charger can supply maximum 1.8 A of current. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a dedicated charger. The dedicated charger shorts the D+ and D- pins with a resistance of 200Ω, disabling data transfer and allowing the charger to be detected. This allows very simple, high current chargers to be manufactured.

    So basically when your phone is connected to your computer, it is operating in "communication mode", and can only draw 500 mA. When attached to a wall charger, it is in "charging mode" and can draw the full 1.5 A.
    09-23-09 04:20 PM
  6. Don_Ignacio's Avatar
    Yay, another chance to show off my USB knowledge!

    Basically the reason has to do with the specifications of the USB protocal. A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0 There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, high-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. Your blackberry is a high power device, and therefore should be drawing a maximum of 500 mA.

    However, with the Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub charger can supply maximum 1.5 A when communicating at low-speed or full-speed, maximum 900 mA when communicating at hi-speed, no upper current limit when no communication is taking place. A dedicated charger can supply maximum 1.8 A of current. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a dedicated charger. The dedicated charger shorts the D+ and D- pins with a resistance of 200?, disabling data transfer and allowing the charger to be detected. This allows very simple, high current chargers to be manufactured.

    So basically when your phone is connected to your computer, it is operating in "communication mode", and can only draw 500 mA. When attached to a wall charger, it is in "charging mode" and can draw the full 1.5 A.
    A complete answer, that's what cb users ask for!
    Thank you very much!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-23-09 04:23 PM
  7. synaptyx's Avatar
    Great info, thanks for that!
    09-23-09 07:00 PM
  8. mnlmn218's Avatar
    Yay, another chance to show off my USB knowledge!

    Basically the reason has to do with the specifications of the USB protocal. A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0 There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, high-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. Your blackberry is a high power device, and therefore should be drawing a maximum of 500 mA.

    However, with the Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub charger can supply maximum 1.5 A when communicating at low-speed or full-speed, maximum 900 mA when communicating at hi-speed, no upper current limit when no communication is taking place. A dedicated charger can supply maximum 1.8 A of current. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a dedicated charger. The dedicated charger shorts the D+ and D- pins with a resistance of 200Ω, disabling data transfer and allowing the charger to be detected. This allows very simple, high current chargers to be manufactured.

    So basically when your phone is connected to your computer, it is operating in "communication mode", and can only draw 500 mA. When attached to a wall charger, it is in "charging mode" and can draw the full 1.5 A.
    Hey...that's what I was gonna say...just kidding
    09-23-09 07:11 PM
  9. boydude's Avatar
    Yay, another chance to show off my USB knowledge!

    Basically the reason has to do with the specifications of the USB protocal. A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0 There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, high-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. Your blackberry is a high power device, and therefore should be drawing a maximum of 500 mA.

    However, with the Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub charger can supply maximum 1.5 A when communicating at low-speed or full-speed, maximum 900 mA when communicating at hi-speed, no upper current limit when no communication is taking place. A dedicated charger can supply maximum 1.8 A of current. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a dedicated charger. The dedicated charger shorts the D+ and D- pins with a resistance of 200Ω, disabling data transfer and allowing the charger to be detected. This allows very simple, high current chargers to be manufactured.

    So basically when your phone is connected to your computer, it is operating in "communication mode", and can only draw 500 mA. When attached to a wall charger, it is in "charging mode" and can draw the full 1.5 A.

    thanks for the info put's it into better perspective now.
    09-23-09 07:30 PM
  10. LuvMyBB's Avatar
    Yay, another chance to show off my USB knowledge!

    Basically the reason has to do with the specifications of the USB protocal. A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0 There are two types of devices: low-power and high-power. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, high-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. Your blackberry is a high power device, and therefore should be drawing a maximum of 500 mA.

    However, with the Battery Charging Specification, new powering modes are added to the USB specification. A host or hub charger can supply maximum 1.5 A when communicating at low-speed or full-speed, maximum 900 mA when communicating at hi-speed, no upper current limit when no communication is taking place. A dedicated charger can supply maximum 1.8 A of current. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a dedicated charger. The dedicated charger shorts the D+ and D- pins with a resistance of 200Ω, disabling data transfer and allowing the charger to be detected. This allows very simple, high current chargers to be manufactured.

    So basically when your phone is connected to your computer, it is operating in "communication mode", and can only draw 500 mA. When attached to a wall charger, it is in "charging mode" and can draw the full 1.5 A.
    Heck, everybody knows THAT.
    09-23-09 11:37 PM
  11. Teek's Avatar
    Giant u took the words right out of my mouth, verbatim .

    Thanks for sharing

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    09-24-09 03:14 AM
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