1. navyp220's Avatar
    I've had a few in the past, been less than thrilled. Been a few years since I've had one and the seem to look better than those of a couple of years ago, they sure are more expensive than I remember.

    Please recommend one or two thanks.
    10-02-09 06:02 AM
  2. uflraptor's Avatar
    Pretty dangerous question as everyone has their own experiences. Kind o like asking what is the best car. You can probably find a number if good threads relating to this same topic.

    All that being said I have been very pleased with the Jawbone. I am still using the original. I understand the newer ones are even better. I tried many before deciding in the Jawbone.

    You really have to find the one thsat works for you.
    10-02-09 06:17 AM
  3. acecommander's Avatar
    Before a recommendation can be helpful, it would be a good idea to describe how you plan to use the device. Listening to music, videos, phone calls. While working out or jogging? All these factors will determine which is best for you.

    Personally, I use the Jabra BT530. It's not the most comfortable device for people with small ear canals, but for me it's good. It's not noise canceling, but it is A2DP compatible, so I can not only listen to music, but movies and music videos as well.

    What I would suggest you do is go to a retailer that offers a 30 day refund, buy a unit, and if you don't like it, return it and try another.
    10-02-09 07:09 AM
  4. dchawk81's Avatar
    I've had a Motorola H710 for a couple days now. It's quite addicting to use.

    I have no previous experience with bluetooth headsets, but the call quality on this model is good to excellent in my opinion. It was easy to pair up, people can hear me very well, and I can hear them very well. It uses a speaker that sits flush against your ear rather than a bud that sits inside your ear, so it doesn't matter how big or small your ear canals are.

    With Slacker Radio, it's not so hot. Sounds very weak by default and if you crank it, it gets distorted. I don't recommend it for that purpose.

    It looks like a cockroach.
    Last edited by dchawk81; 10-02-09 at 07:29 AM.
    10-02-09 07:23 AM
  5. VergeOfChaos's Avatar
    I found the best thing to do is get into law enforcement. Then, even if you do get stopped for talking on your phone, you don't get ticketed.
    10-02-09 07:49 AM
  6. clitrenta's Avatar
    I've had a Motorola H710 for a couple days now. It's quite addicting to use.

    I have no previous experience with bluetooth headsets, but the call quality on this model is good to excellent in my opinion. It was easy to pair up, people can hear me very well, and I can hear them very well. It uses a speaker that sits flush against your ear rather than a bud that sits inside your ear, so it doesn't matter how big or small your ear canals are.

    With Slacker Radio, it's not so hot. Sounds very weak by default and if you crank it, it gets distorted. I don't recommend it for that purpose.

    It looks like a cockroach.
    I have this one also and am very happy with it. I can't wear any headset that actually goes into my ear (it hurts after a while) and this one gets good sound and stays on your head really well. Best one I've owned and I've had a LOT.
    10-02-09 08:08 AM
  7. Tiassa's Avatar
    I'll add to the H710 lovers as well. I only use it as to talk on the phone with, but people I talk with say it sounds great and I don't have any problems. An added bonus is that it uses the same charger (micro USB) as my Pearl Flip, so I only need to carry one charger.
    10-02-09 08:51 AM
  8. vinmontRD's Avatar
    I've tried several over the years - hate to think how much I've spent on them and how many are sitting in a parts box on my shelf (the "bluetooth graveyard").

    This will likely sound silly, but it took me a while to realize that, when buying from most retail outlets, I can buy one, bring it home and try it -- and return it if it's a disappointment. If you buy mail order that can get to be inconvenient and a bit more costly (shipping costs). If you buy at a local store (e.g., Best Buy, AT&T or T-Mobile retail store, Radio Shack, etc), you may or may not get a good price -- but you can typically just bring back a disappointing headset and get your money back (check each store / seller for their particular terms before depending on this!).

    As you've seen here (and likely elsewhere as well), it's a very individual decision. Headsets fit everyone differently, as heads, faces and ears tend to be pretty variable across different people. I always tended to read up on the technology and sound performance initially to try to choose the "best" ones on the market, and then tried to see how well they fit.

    After a while it became clear to me that "best" is not necessarily the same for everyone. If a headset puts out great sound -- but only if the earpiece fits your ear canal well -- then it's only going to be the "best" for people who happen to ears that are the right size and shape.

    The original Jawbone illustrates that point well. When it first came out, it was a huge leap in audio quality for BT headsets and set a new standard of comparison. BUT...the ergonomics only seemed right for people with larger ear canals, and the headset tended to flop off the ear for a large number of users as well. So some people had an unbeatable experience with it, and others hated it.

    By the time I got my original Jawbone, I had spent so much money on these that I was really reluctant to shelve it even though the fit, for me, was far less than ideal. I did a lot of web searching and found that others in my situation had discovered that you could replace the stock ear fittings with Jabra mini ear gels, which come in a set with 2 each of 3 different sizes for about $5. All of a sudden, the Jawbone fit my ear canal perfectly -- sound quality jumped up an order of magnitude, especially the bass response. Only problem was that the combination of the ear hook and the way it held the Jawbone from the center of the unit (instead of closer to one end) seemed to make it still a floppy fit on my head. I put up with this for a while because the sound was unbeatable both for me and for the people I was speaking with. They couldn't tell I was on a mobile phone, and the background noise suppression was excellent.

    Voice dialing via BT was always a big issue for me, btw -- some headsets handle it well, and some apparently distort the sound enough so that the voice recognition software on the phone has a hard time interpreting what you're saying. This is still not consistent across brands.

    I had used a number of Motorola models in the past. I used to find models like the HS 850 to be very convenient (open/close the fold in mike to turn it on/off, collapsable ear hook) and pocketable and easy to use, but the sound was so-so, probably because the speaker was external to the ear canal. Also - I found the the rubber trim on the 850's, such as the air seal/cushion around the edge of the speaker, tended to shred off the unit after several months of daily use. They just didn't hold up well.

    I tried Cardo Scala, and it seemed pretty good for the price, but at a lower feature and quality level than appealed to me overall.

    I had been reading about BlueAnt z9i for a while, and it seemed like a promising alternative to the Jawbone. When I saw both the BlueAnt and the Jawbone II on sale at a T-Mobile store, I picked up a BlueAnt and brought it home to try. Initial reactions were very good. Fit, features and operation were excellent. It looked good (smaller than Jawbone). After a few days of use, though, people were reporting back to me that the sound at THEIR end of the call was not as good as when I was on the Jawbone, and the noise suppression on the BlueAnt seemed more artificial sounding as well. I also found the the Blackberry's voice recognition software didn't seem quite as reliable via the BlueAnt as it had been with the Jawbone. Could just be me and the way my voice sounds -- but that's all part of getting the right device.

    I returned the BlueAnt to T-Mobile (finally exercising the option that I had apparently had for years!) and took home the Jawbone II. In short: even better sound than the original Jawbone, smaller and lighter housing. The stock ear pieces were better than the original model but still didn't feel good on me. I popped my Jabra ear gels on it, and found that this made a near perfect combination for me. Excellent fit and sound, and the headset tends to hang on to my ear quite well for several hours of comfortable use.

    That was about a year ago, and was the end of my bluetooth quest for a while. Since then, I replaced my car with one that has built-in bluetooth, so I don't use the headset anywhere nearly as often these days. If I were to start up again, I would probably home in on Jawbone, BlueAnt, Plantronics and Jabra as the most promising candidates (although I'm sure others continue to improve as well).

    The Jawbone II has dropped to about $55 (that's what Tiger is charging for it right now -- I haven't comparison shopped though), making it a great deal I think. The BlueAnt z9i is now about $60, and the v1 had dropped to $70 and it has a very slick voice control user interface as well, and BlueAnt does something the other vendors don't do: they provide firmware updates that are easily installed in your headset, improving quality long even after your purchase. The Jawbone Prime is now the top of that line for about $110, and is supposed to be even better than the Jawbone II -- and Aliph (Jawbone manufacturer) introduced some fancy new ear ergonomic earpieces that look promising (although I haven't tried them).

    I had tried early Plantronics units. The sound was good, but they were just too big and uncomfortable for me. The line has evolved a lot since then and improved, but I haven't tried them -- I'm sure others here can comment on them.

    You may also find interesting deals on others like Jabra, Motorola (some like them, some don't -- my general impression is "glitzy", but a bit cheaply made), Samsung, Sony and Nokia. I know that LG makes these too, but have no idea about their quality or value. If you really have time to spare for product research, you can check out others like BlueTrek, jWIN, Sennheiser and probably a few others.

    To really confuse things, you might also consider how good these are as music headsets. In general, the single ear BT headsets make disappointing music headsets, although they're better than nothing. If you start considering the stereo BT headsets, you enter a whole new world of personal research and comparison. Motorola makes several of these that have a good reputation.

    My strongest recommendation is that find a purchase process that lets you try the headset in your real world situation for a few days, with the option to return it without undue expense. A headset choice is very personal, and this is the only way you can confidently get one that really is best for you.
    10-02-09 09:03 AM
  9. navyp220's Avatar
    Thank you all for your detailed input. I will take it in consideration and look at the local retail stores for a headset.
    10-02-09 01:07 PM
  10. monkeee2002's Avatar
    I found the best thing to do is get into law enforcement. Then, even if you do get stopped for talking on your phone, you don't get ticketed.
    And cops wonder why no one likes them.
    10-02-09 03:05 PM
  11. French's Avatar
    The new Plantronics Discovery 975 is getting very good reviews, and it's very sleek looking.

    It replaces the 925 and the 925 is also a headset that got very good reviews. Check out Amazon.
    10-02-09 03:20 PM
  12. utgreenhead's Avatar
    And cops wonder why no one likes them.
    I find it funny that a lot of people dislike cops, until they have a burglar in their house, or are being robbed at gun-point. Guess who they wish was walking by at that point?

    It would be great if response time when they need the cops was effected by how people bash them when they don't need them. For instance, if you frequently tout cops for doing a good job and generally liking them, they would respond to your calls in say 30 seconds. But if you bash them and generally speak that you don't like them, they might respond to your calls after an hour. That's what I call "reaping what you sew"!

    Of course, people could also do something about it if they dont like the Police Department's policies. They could run for public office (Mayor) and change some of the policies they dont like. If the cops work for you, you could fire them for talking on the phone just like they give you a ticket for doing.

    Sorry to get off topic. I use an original jawbone, which I think is kinda big and bulky. I also have a plantronic that doesnt have an ear ring. I'm not too big on it, as it frequently slides down and points toward the ground.
    10-03-09 03:57 PM
  13. tsells's Avatar
    The Plantronics 975 was extremely comfortable but I got mixed reviews from the other end of my phone calls. Some people said that it sounded great and others (many of them) said that there was a terrible echo. After trying different settings for four days and continued bad connections I returned it and got the Jawbone Prime. The Prime was not as comfortable as the 975 but I am getting used to it. The buttons are "touchy" and I am also getting used to them. The sound quality on the other end is consistently very good (as told to me) and the noice cancellation of backgorund sounds (wind, radio, car, etc.) is exceptional.
    I changed the Jawbone Prime's eargel to the Plantronics 975 eargel and it was much more comfortable.
    10-03-09 04:15 PM
  14. Razee's Avatar
    You should also try a bluetooth headset holder called Blueclip. I really love this holder. I don't have to worry about dropping my headset or losing it because it remains attached to me at all times. I have the retractable blueclip which is awesome and but it also comes in a necklace version.

    Great features:
    retractable headset holder
    no assembly necessary
    lightweight but strong
    different blueclip styles
    works with all headset styles
    keeps headset attached at all times

    Oh yeah and it doesn't cost a lot and it saves you from having to replace your lost or broken headset.
    The website is NectarAccessories.com and click on Bluetooth Headset Holder.
    10-28-09 06:02 PM
  15. Razee's Avatar
    Great Bluetooth Headset Holders! Limited time Free Ground Shipping!
    Check them out at NectarAccessories.com
    12-04-09 11:18 AM
  16. redwanhuq's Avatar
    I use the stereo bluetooth LG-HBS 250. Works incredibly. My incoming call quality is perfect and outgoing is good, but requires some enunciation. They're not noise-cancelling which is good for me because I have to be able to hear others while I used them to listen to music at work :P
    12-09-09 12:34 PM
  17. jgodin03's Avatar
    I use Motorola H15 - 99$ CAN(waiting to test the new H17)

    2 other very good bluetooth: Plantronic Voyager Pro - 130$CAN, and Jawbone Prime - 140$ CAN

    For music I use Nokia BH-601, very cheap and performant!
    Last edited by jgodin03; 12-09-09 at 12:43 PM.
    12-09-09 12:41 PM
  18. stick_slinger's Avatar
    Hi
    I concur with one of the previous posters.

    I've got the Jabra BT530 and find it really really good - best one i've used infact. It supports voice dialling too.

    It comes with different ear gels and loops so you can change the size to make it more comfortable.

    Good luck

    Julian
    12-09-09 02:49 PM
  19. cnashx's Avatar
    I just got the new Jawbone PRIME about a week ago, and so far I LOVE IT. I have been using it just at work since I work on a construction site. It helps a lot with the construction noises and also means I don't have to pull out my phone and get it dirty all the time. =P
    12-09-09 07:26 PM
  20. riverdale's Avatar
    have you guys seen those ones on ebay you need a magnet to remove?? crazy!!
    12-13-09 09:37 AM
  21. French's Avatar
    have you guys seen those ones on ebay you need a magnet to remove?? crazy!!
    Link?

    10 char
    12-14-09 05:09 AM
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