1. Diamond Dog's Avatar
    The OEM blackberry car charger for the 9700 puts out 5V and 700 milliamps. Its big and bulky.

    I want to get the Belkin micro charger and it puts out 5V BUT 1000 milliamps.

    I heard the milliamp rating doesn't matter as the USB cable and USB technology keeps the proper electricity coming in so that it doesnt fry the BB.

    Is this true?

    It would be nicer to have the Belkin charger and then I could just switch devices ie. Jawbone (which say to only use THEIR charger BTW), GPS unit, my BB9700 etc.
    02-11-10 10:54 AM
  2. mofoahh's Avatar
    as long as you buy a legit car charger you will be fine, if you're buying one of those cheap car chargers on ebay you have a higher chance of frying your phone. car chargers have come a long way.
    Last edited by JeffH; 02-11-10 at 04:48 PM. Reason: merged
    02-11-10 10:56 AM
  3. jeffh's Avatar
    A definitive answer is not possible. It's a question of risk, and that means probabilities. A car's electrical environment has more variability than your home's, so a car charger has to deal with a variety of input conditions. It's unlikely that any of these will damage your BlackBerry, but the likelihood of damage is probably slightly higher with a car charger than it is with a wall charger or USB charger. If you consistently unplug the charger before you start your car, you can protect both the charger and your BlackBerry from start-up transients. That's likely the most hazardous operating condition.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-11-10 11:07 AM
  4. Diamond Dog's Avatar
    is it true that the usb cable and usb technology regulate the millamps in some way? Only allowing it to draw what it needs?

    Sorry if I sound retardedd. I am in sales so I didnt study all that electricity stuff in school
    02-11-10 12:01 PM
  5. jeffh's Avatar
    The USB cable doesn't control the current or voltage. The USB spec says a USB port on a pc is supposed to be able to supply 5VDC at 500mA. Not all pc USB ports meet the spec. The BlackBerry provides the charging control. If you can provide 5VDC at 500 mA, the BlackBerry will charge. If you can provide more current, the device will charge a little faster, up to some limit. BlackBerry devices won't overcharge, so leaving them plugged in won't hurt them. If you are using a car charger, you should unplug it from the car's electrical supply to protect it from start-up electrical transients that can damage the charger, and possibly even the BlackBerry.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-11-10 02:15 PM
  6. EnergyPlus's Avatar
    This is a question that's been bugging me for some time now. "Back in the day" as they say, I was an early adopter of cell phones. I was working for a large company when I got my first one and, being something of a tech geek, I was the first in my office to get a car charger. I used to charge the device up on the car charger all the time. You can imagine my surprise when, after just a few short months, my battery was pretty much worthless and I had to replace it. When I informed the service rep that I almost always charged in the car, he said "that's the problem, car chargers are rapid chargers and thus, wear down the battery much, much faster." Is that still true?

    As a professional photographer, I use AA and AAA batteries by the truck load. The "15 minute" chargers are great in an emergency, but those batteries do not last very long. The longer, slow charging batteries/chargers, while taking HOURS to charge, last much, much longer in terms of both lifespan and per-use, so I am assuming this same concept applies to the phone car chargers.
    02-11-10 02:54 PM
  7. sourkevin's Avatar
    Thanks, that's why I posted here.
    Im pretty sure that deals with the type of metals that are used inside the batteries...

    Lithium Ion are installed in the bb, great recharge cycle numbers and a nice slow drain.

    Alkaline Batteries drain fast, and are not good at holding their charge.
    02-11-10 03:40 PM
  8. EnergyPlus's Avatar
    Im pretty sure that deals with the type of metals that are used inside the batteries...

    Lithium Ion are installed in the bb, great recharge cycle numbers and a nice slow drain.

    Alkaline Batteries drain fast, and are not good at holding their charge.
    And that well might be the case, I hadn't thought about that fact that, "back in the day" the batteries were all NiCads, so they may have simply been far more sensitive to fast charging than the newer, Li batteries. Thanks for the feedback.
    02-11-10 04:34 PM
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