03-17-21 01:56 AM
32 12
tools
  1. MilanSk's Avatar
    Hi, could you recommend me tools or settings to enhance privacy on your mobile? First of all, I would like my internet traffic, especially internet browsing, to be protected from the internet provider and other people. Is VPN a good tool? I also ask because VPNs are not highly recommended on the website https://www.privacytools.io/providers/vpn/. Or do you recommend something else or other settings? I would also like to note that I use my mobile phone without a google account. Thanks for the advice.
    03-06-21 03:04 PM
  2. conite's Avatar
    Hi, could you recommend me tools or settings to enhance privacy on your mobile? First of all, I would like my internet traffic, especially internet browsing, to be protected from the internet provider and other people. Is VPN a good tool? I also ask because VPNs are not highly recommended on the website https://www.privacytools.io/providers/vpn/. Or do you recommend something else or other settings? I would also like to note that I use my mobile phone without a google account. Thanks for the advice.
    Are you more worried about a hacker listening in to your WiFi connection, or apps tracking you?

    If the former, use a paid VPN. If the latter, use Netguard. www.Netguard.me
    Last edited by conite; 03-06-21 at 03:38 PM.
    app_Developer likes this.
    03-06-21 03:25 PM
  3. MilanSk's Avatar
    Probably the first one. I would like to minimize my ISP to keep track of my internet traffic.
    03-06-21 03:33 PM
  4. Smokeaire's Avatar
    Probably the first one. I would like to minimize my ISP to keep track of my internet traffic.
    I use NordVPN on my phone, my wife's phone, and my laptop. It works great with very responsive customer service.
    03-06-21 04:15 PM
  5. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    It's important to understand what a VPN does, and what it doesn't do.

    When you subscribe to a VPN service, and you run the VPN software, it creates an encrypted connection between your device and a server owned by the VPN company, so that your Internet traffic appears to be originating at the VPN's server instead of your device. However, at that point, your traffic is no longer encrypted by the VPN, so you are relying on your app (whichever app[s] you are using) to protect your traffic. Your browser connections are protected if they are https like most websites today, but other apps may or may not be encrypted. Plus, the website you are connecting TO can access your metadata and, if you log in, they can access your account info. They may not be able to geolocate you based on your IP, but otherwise, there's not a ton of extra protection against the service or website you are using. Your ISP's filters might not be able to catch you doing things, but it's not like your connection is end-to-end encrypted by the VPN - its only connected to the point it reaches the VPN's servers.

    And if yo are using, say, the Facebook app, then whatever tracking mechanisms are in the app will still track you - they'll just see you coming from a different origin point. If you are logging into FB (or any other service), their apps can tie together your VPN and non-VPN use and know you're the same person.

    A VPN is an important piece of the privacy puzzle, but it is far from a complete solution. You can install a vault door onto a tent, and perhaps you'll have a very well-protected doorway, but it will hardly prevent determined people from getting into the tent.
    app_Developer likes this.
    03-06-21 08:59 PM
  6. MilanSk's Avatar
    OK, can you help / advise me how to add complete protection, resp. how to maximize it?
    03-07-21 12:52 PM
  7. conite's Avatar
    OK, can you help / advise me how to add complete protection, resp. how to maximize it?
    You can use Tor Browser, lock it down tight, and run over a VPN.

    But you'd be sacrificing speed and functionality.
    03-07-21 02:00 PM
  8. MilanSk's Avatar
    I read somewhere that this combination lowers the level of security. But I don't remember the details anymore. It was probably on the website www.privacytools.io
    03-07-21 02:04 PM
  9. conite's Avatar
    I read somewhere that this combination lowers the level of security. But I don't remember the details anymore. It was probably on the website www.privacytools.io
    You read it wrong then.

    Although we are discussing browser privacy - not overall device security.

    Security is patching, using the latest version of Android, and keeping your apps updated.
    03-07-21 02:05 PM
  10. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Security and privacy are different things, but each have many different threat vectors, and there's no single solution to any of them. Certain things you can do will stop a few specific threats, but will do little or nothing to stop other threats.

    Imagine you have a million dollars in value - let's say 10 bearer bonds each worth $100,000 - at your house, and you live alone, and you need to secure them, because anyone who takes them can cash them in or give them to someone else as payment or whatever. They are effectively untraceable cash, except far less bulky. You live in a tract house in a middle-class neighborhood. How do you protect these bonds, assuming you have to keep them at home for some reason?

    You can change the locks on your doors, but that won't prevent them from being picked. How do you stop someone from kicking in the door? Coming in through a window? Entering via the crawlspace hatch? Cutting a hole in the roof? Cutting a hole in the wall? Bribing your housekeeper, or your dog walker? Befriending your parents or siblings and stealing or copying their key to your house?

    Sure, there are solutions to all of those threats, but they get increasingly difficult and expensive to thwart. Now, what happens if you suddenly become famous, and everyone KNOWS you have this money there? Now you may need to hire security - and you need to make sure someone can't bribe or compromise your security and draw them away from the house.

    Think about the security the President has - how many layers there are, and how many things are checked, blocked, and limited when he's moving around? How many people are inconvenienced in the process? Roads completely shut down so he can travel quickly and safely? The expense of flying in a bunch of limos and chase cars - that have to be guarded at all times - to any event?

    The point I'm making is that you need to understand the threats against you, and you need to use solutions or methods to thwart those threats. But you also need to realize that in doing so, you are going to endure inconvenience and additional expense with each new layer of security you add, and you may have to sacrifice some things entirely.

    If you want true privacy, you have to start over from scratch. A new phone with a new number and a new dummy account with none of your personal information (this, I believe, eliminates the iPhone, because I believe you need a credit card to set up an Apple ID, which is necessary to get apps - but if I'm mistaken, someone correct me). You will need to use a VPN on this phone from Day 1 (note that the most recent version of iOS [13 and 14] exempts Apple processes from being routed through VPNs, so your iPhone will talk back to Apple directly, and there's nothing you can do about it). You will need to use the VPN always, and you must never, ever tie this new account to any of your personal data, which means no logging into any old account that was created using your actual information.

    Obviously, that means there's a lot of your own stuff that you won't be able to have access to, BUT, you can do things like use social media anonymously.

    If you actually want to use your personal accounts, then some of your activity WILL be tracked, at the very least by the services you use. If you buy stuff from Amazon, or you Uber to your house, or you do online banking, Amazon, Uber, and your bank are doing to know about your activities, and your information can be sold. If you watch stuff on Netflix, that info can be sold. If you post on forums like this one, that information can be linked back to your account. If you use SMS (which is completely unencrypted and plain text for your carrier, the recipient's carrier, and any data network in between), that can be traced to you.

    Using a device on the latest OS and the latest security patch is important - if you are using a device that is no longer receiving updates, then you are using a device that has KNOWN, PUBLISHED vulnerabilities, and hackers can (and do!) create bots that can test online devices for these vulnerabilities and then attack/infect them.

    You need to use apps only from trusted vendors, and you need to review those apps on a regular basis. Sometimes a company or just an app can get sold, or fall under new management, or just gets careless, and something that was once considered "secure" no longer is. For example, the Barcode Scanner app that was fine for many years, but recently had an update pushed out that was infected and compromised a bunch of devices.

    You can use a VPN, and an ad/cookie blocker like Blokdata. You could even buy a phone where you can use a de-Googled version of Android - though understand that you'll be giving up some capabilities in the process, and will have to do many things manually that are normally done automatically - like data backups - so it's a serious commitment.

    Ultimately, you have to decide what your threat levels are, and what level of limitations and inconvenience you are willing to endure to increase your security and privacy. You can't have real security or privacy without a good amount of inconvenience and extra work, and without sacrificing the ability to do many common things. Most people find some middle ground that they can live with, but where exactly that point is for you, only you can decide.
    03-08-21 02:19 PM
  11. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Security and privacy are different things, but each have many different threat vectors, and there's no single solution to any of them. Certain things you can do will stop a few specific threats, but will do little or nothing to stop other threats.

    Imagine you have a million dollars in value - let's say 10 bearer bonds each worth $100,000 - at your house, and you live alone, and you need to secure them, because anyone who takes them can cash them in or give them to someone else as payment or whatever. They are effectively untraceable cash, except far less bulky. You live in a tract house in a middle-class neighborhood. How do you protect these bonds, assuming you have to keep them at home for some reason?

    You can change the locks on your doors, but that won't prevent them from being picked. How do you stop someone from kicking in the door? Coming in through a window? Entering via the crawlspace hatch? Cutting a hole in the roof? Cutting a hole in the wall? Bribing your housekeeper, or your dog walker? Befriending your parents or siblings and stealing or copying their key to your house?

    Sure, there are solutions to all of those threats, but they get increasingly difficult and expensive to thwart. Now, what happens if you suddenly become famous, and everyone KNOWS you have this money there? Now you may need to hire security - and you need to make sure someone can't bribe or compromise your security and draw them away from the house.

    Think about the security the President has - how many layers there are, and how many things are checked, blocked, and limited when he's moving around? How many people are inconvenienced in the process? Roads completely shut down so he can travel quickly and safely? The expense of flying in a bunch of limos and chase cars - that have to be guarded at all times - to any event?

    The point I'm making is that you need to understand the threats against you, and you need to use solutions or methods to thwart those threats. But you also need to realize that in doing so, you are going to endure inconvenience and additional expense with each new layer of security you add, and you may have to sacrifice some things entirely.

    If you want true privacy, you have to start over from scratch. A new phone with a new number and a new dummy account with none of your personal information (this, I believe, eliminates the iPhone, because I believe you need a credit card to set up an Apple ID, which is necessary to get apps - but if I'm mistaken, someone correct me). You will need to use a VPN on this phone from Day 1 (note that the most recent version of iOS [13 and 14] exempts Apple processes from being routed through VPNs, so your iPhone will talk back to Apple directly, and there's nothing you can do about it). You will need to use the VPN always, and you must never, ever tie this new account to any of your personal data, which means no logging into any old account that was created using your actual information.

    Obviously, that means there's a lot of your own stuff that you won't be able to have access to, BUT, you can do things like use social media anonymously.

    If you actually want to use your personal accounts, then some of your activity WILL be tracked, at the very least by the services you use. If you buy stuff from Amazon, or you Uber to your house, or you do online banking, Amazon, Uber, and your bank are doing to know about your activities, and your information can be sold. If you watch stuff on Netflix, that info can be sold. If you post on forums like this one, that information can be linked back to your account. If you use SMS (which is completely unencrypted and plain text for your carrier, the recipient's carrier, and any data network in between), that can be traced to you.

    Using a device on the latest OS and the latest security patch is important - if you are using a device that is no longer receiving updates, then you are using a device that has KNOWN, PUBLISHED vulnerabilities, and hackers can (and do!) create bots that can test online devices for these vulnerabilities and then attack/infect them.

    You need to use apps only from trusted vendors, and you need to review those apps on a regular basis. Sometimes a company or just an app can get sold, or fall under new management, or just gets careless, and something that was once considered "secure" no longer is. For example, the Barcode Scanner app that was fine for many years, but recently had an update pushed out that was infected and compromised a bunch of devices.

    You can use a VPN, and an ad/cookie blocker like Blokdata. You could even buy a phone where you can use a de-Googled version of Android - though understand that you'll be giving up some capabilities in the process, and will have to do many things manually that are normally done automatically - like data backups - so it's a serious commitment.

    Ultimately, you have to decide what your threat levels are, and what level of limitations and inconvenience you are willing to endure to increase your security and privacy. You can't have real security or privacy without a good amount of inconvenience and extra work, and without sacrificing the ability to do many common things. Most people find some middle ground that they can live with, but where exactly that point is for you, only you can decide.
    In essence, it's not really possible to live off the grid and simultaneously enjoy all the conveniences of living on the grid anonymously.
    03-08-21 05:31 PM
  12. MilanSk's Avatar
    Thanks for the general and explanatory introduction. I am aware that it is always something for something. I just feel that a large part of your article was in the spirit of maintaining anonymity, and I am primarily concerned with maintaining an adequate, respectively. basic degree of privacy. Due to objective circumstances, it is impossible for me to be anonymous. Therefore, I would like to be guaranteed a reasonable degree of privacy, to which I was accustomed in the recent past, respectively. I thought that this privacy was protected in connection with the use of my mobile phone. Therefore, I would like you to recommend me which applications to use on my mobile phone in order to reasonably reduce the level of monitoring my privacy on my mobile phone. I am also aware that maximum privacy on mobile is excluded due to the overall social trend, which we have been drifting for some time. I have already read some articles about tools such as VPN, Netguard, Blocada, DNScrypt, Orbot or Tor and the like. I would like you to recommend to me how to use them effectively in each other in order to protect privacy.
    03-09-21 01:49 PM
  13. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Thanks for the general and explanatory introduction. I am aware that it is always something for something. I just feel that a large part of your article was in the spirit of maintaining anonymity, and I am primarily concerned with maintaining an adequate, respectively. basic degree of privacy. Due to objective circumstances, it is impossible for me to be anonymous. Therefore, I would like to be guaranteed a reasonable degree of privacy, to which I was accustomed in the recent past, respectively. I thought that this privacy was protected in connection with the use of my mobile phone. Therefore, I would like you to recommend me which applications to use on my mobile phone in order to reasonably reduce the level of monitoring my privacy on my mobile phone. I am also aware that maximum privacy on mobile is excluded due to the overall social trend, which we have been drifting for some time. I have already read some articles about tools such as VPN, Netguard, Blocada, DNScrypt, Orbot or Tor and the like. I would like you to recommend to me how to use them effectively in each other in order to protect privacy.
    I believe many people want privacy and then don’t like trade offs. At the other end are people who don’t care about privacy and have no idea how much is already known about them which is more than imagined.

    Go into your phone and turn off location settings. Logout from every account you’re logged into. How does that affect your convenience?
    03-09-21 01:57 PM
  14. Emaderton3's Avatar
    I just got an email from a local computer place that said there is a new bulletin listing several vpns as compromised by hackers. I would make sure you pick a reputable one.
    03-09-21 02:15 PM
  15. MilanSk's Avatar
    Many of these things I have had since I started using my new android mobile. Even at the cost of lower comfort.
    03-09-21 02:20 PM
  16. MilanSk's Avatar
    In this regard, I rely on recommendations from the net or from this forum.

    Which VPNs were they?
    03-09-21 02:25 PM
  17. Emaderton3's Avatar
    In this regard, I rely on recommendations from the net or from this forum.

    Which VPNs were they?
    It is a "remote control virus" contained in the apps from the Google Play Store. They listed Cake VPN, Pacific VPN, eVPN, and some other non-VPN apps.
    03-09-21 02:30 PM
  18. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    Security and privacy are different things, but each have many different threat vectors, and there's no single solution to any of them. Certain things you can do will stop a few specific threats, but will do little or nothing to stop other threats.

    Imagine you have a million dollars in value - let's say 10 bearer bonds each worth $100,000 - at your house, and you live alone, and you need to secure them, because anyone who takes them can cash them in or give them to someone else as payment or whatever. They are effectively untraceable cash, except far less bulky. You live in a tract house in a middle-class neighborhood. How do you protect these bonds, assuming you have to keep them at home for some reason?

    You can change the locks on your doors, but that won't prevent them from being picked. How do you stop someone from kicking in the door? Coming in through a window? Entering via the crawlspace hatch? Cutting a hole in the roof? Cutting a hole in the wall? Bribing your housekeeper, or your dog walker? Befriending your parents or siblings and stealing or copying their key to your house?

    Sure, there are solutions to all of those threats, but they get increasingly difficult and expensive to thwart. Now, what happens if you suddenly become famous, and everyone KNOWS you have this money there? Now you may need to hire security - and you need to make sure someone can't bribe or compromise your security and draw them away from the house.

    Think about the security the President has - how many layers there are, and how many things are checked, blocked, and limited when he's moving around? How many people are inconvenienced in the process? Roads completely shut down so he can travel quickly and safely? The expense of flying in a bunch of limos and chase cars - that have to be guarded at all times - to any event?

    The point I'm making is that you need to understand the threats against you, and you need to use solutions or methods to thwart those threats. But you also need to realize that in doing so, you are going to endure inconvenience and additional expense with each new layer of security you add, and you may have to sacrifice some things entirely.

    If you want true privacy, you have to start over from scratch. A new phone with a new number and a new dummy account with none of your personal information (this, I believe, eliminates the iPhone, because I believe you need a credit card to set up an Apple ID, which is necessary to get apps - but if I'm mistaken, someone correct me). You will need to use a VPN on this phone from Day 1 (note that the most recent version of iOS [13 and 14] exempts Apple processes from being routed through VPNs, so your iPhone will talk back to Apple directly, and there's nothing you can do about it). You will need to use the VPN always, and you must never, ever tie this new account to any of your personal data, which means no logging into any old account that was created using your actual information.

    Obviously, that means there's a lot of your own stuff that you won't be able to have access to, BUT, you can do things like use social media anonymously.

    If you actually want to use your personal accounts, then some of your activity WILL be tracked, at the very least by the services you use. If you buy stuff from Amazon, or you Uber to your house, or you do online banking, Amazon, Uber, and your bank are doing to know about your activities, and your information can be sold. If you watch stuff on Netflix, that info can be sold. If you post on forums like this one, that information can be linked back to your account. If you use SMS (which is completely unencrypted and plain text for your carrier, the recipient's carrier, and any data network in between), that can be traced to you.

    Using a device on the latest OS and the latest security patch is important - if you are using a device that is no longer receiving updates, then you are using a device that has KNOWN, PUBLISHED vulnerabilities, and hackers can (and do!) create bots that can test online devices for these vulnerabilities and then attack/infect them.

    You need to use apps only from trusted vendors, and you need to review those apps on a regular basis. Sometimes a company or just an app can get sold, or fall under new management, or just gets careless, and something that was once considered "secure" no longer is. For example, the Barcode Scanner app that was fine for many years, but recently had an update pushed out that was infected and compromised a bunch of devices.

    You can use a VPN, and an ad/cookie blocker like Blokdata. You could even buy a phone where you can use a de-Googled version of Android - though understand that you'll be giving up some capabilities in the process, and will have to do many things manually that are normally done automatically - like data backups - so it's a serious commitment.

    Ultimately, you have to decide what your threat levels are, and what level of limitations and inconvenience you are willing to endure to increase your security and privacy. You can't have real security or privacy without a good amount of inconvenience and extra work, and without sacrificing the ability to do many common things. Most people find some middle ground that they can live with, but where exactly that point is for you, only you can decide.
    Great analogies. We tell our clients that perfect security is infinitely expensive.

    Privacy is all about compartmentalizing your information so you can control what you share with whom. The extreme ideal would be to have a unique alias identity, credentials, and device for every online service, but that would be so inconvenient that it's silly to even imagine.

    Practically, I think one has to start with your mobile carrier/ISP. If your mobile carrier has your true identity, you're already behind in protecting your privacy. High profile individuals who want greater privacy and security go out of their way to avoid purchasing phones (or even homes) in their own name.

    My mobile carrier does not know my identity. Setting that up and maintaining it is relatively convenient but it means I must pay cash for phones.

    Then, I take advantage of email forwarding services and my own email server to create a different email address for every service I use. That's not at all inconvenient because my password manager keeps track of it all, and is have to use it for my passwords regardless. But it means that, when companies try to share my data, they can't use my email address to correlate my accounts. It also effectively doubles my security because now an attacker would have to guess both my email address and my password.

    Hiding my identity from my ISP would be difficult and expensive, as I would have to start by purchasing a new house through an anonymous trust. So, my ISP has my address, and I have to employ other techniques to hide my data and traffic from them by using my own router and firewall as well as a zero-knowledge DNS service and a trusted VPN.

    I take additional steps to protect my privacy on my iphone, based on my threat model, but I'm largely limited to Apple's privacy model, which is fine, but not as restrictive as I would prefer. My main mitigation strategy for my iPhone is to use it for as few services as possible!

    Posted via CB10
    03-09-21 04:09 PM
  19. co4nd's Avatar
    I just got an email from a local computer place that said there is a new bulletin listing several vpns as compromised by hackers. I would make sure you pick a reputable one.
    The fundamental flaw of a VPN company is that you may be shielding some of your traffic from your ISP, but not your VPN company. What reason do you have to trust your VPN over your ISP?
    app_Developer likes this.
    03-09-21 08:28 PM
  20. conite's Avatar
    The fundamental flaw of a VPN company is that you may be shielding some of your traffic from your ISP, but not your VPN company. What reason do you have to trust your VPN over your ISP?
    That's why you have to do some research.
    03-09-21 08:39 PM
  21. chetmanley's Avatar
    Another option (unfortunately difficult to fully implement on a phone) is to run VPN -> tor -> VPN with two different VPN providers

    In this configuration, the first VPN provider knows your real IP address, but has no idea what your connecting to because all they would see is a tor node.
    The tor entry node would have no idea what your real IP address is because they would only see traffic from the first VPN, and the tor exit node wouldn't know what site your connecting to because the next connection is to the second VPN.
    Finally, the second VPN will only know the final destination address, but have no idea of the user's true IP address, name, etc.

    The only way this works, is if the second VPN is setup anonymously using a pre-paid credit card or crypto currency, and the user never ever connects to it or logs into the account without tor or a 3rd VPN which could be a free VPN (so your 1st VPN can't be linked to it).

    The first VPN could be paid for anonymously also, but less important since they will see your IP address anyway, but atleast they wont have your real name or payment address.

    This in theory should make it very challenging to trace a connection back to the original user since it would require not only the logs (assuming they exist) of two different VPN providers, but also tackling the tor network.

    The closest I've come to doing this on an Android is tor -> VPN. Netguard/Orbot handle the first bit using the Android VPN service, and then a browser based secure proxy addon can be used within a browser for the VPN bit.

    The other benefit of ending the chain with a VPN is flexibility with choosing the exit country, and there are fewer websites actively blocking VPN servers compared to tor exit nodes, so there is more freedom online.
    03-09-21 09:08 PM
  22. MilanSk's Avatar
    What combination of tools in conjunction with a VPN service would you recommend to me to enhance privacy? Firewall, DNS, Tor/Orbot, FireFox with add-ons? If the basis is to be a reliable VPN service, it is impossible to use other tools based on or using a VPN system. Which paid VPN service would you recomended ? Thanks
    03-10-21 03:59 PM
  23. chetmanley's Avatar
    What combination of tools in conjunction with a VPN service would you recommend to me to enhance privacy? Firewall, DNS, Tor/Orbot, FireFox with add-ons? If the basis is to be a reliable VPN service, it is impossible to use other tools based on or using a VPN system. Which paid VPN service would you recomended ? Thanks
    Use all of the above (except DNS which is included with tor and a good VPN service).

    On android, I recommend Netguard + Orbot and use the Tor Browser (which is based on Firefox) with addons like Privacy Badger and Ublock Origin.

    Use a VPN service for those times when a particular site is preventing access because its blocking tor nodes.

    The privacytools.io VPN list is a good start. Some VPN providers are including trackers into their VPN apps, so use Netguard to confirm a given provider's app is on the level (no 3rd party connections) before signing up.
    03-10-21 10:29 PM
  24. MilanSk's Avatar
    Use all of the above (except DNS which is included with tor and a good VPN service).

    On android, I recommend Netguard + Orbot and use the Tor Browser (which is based on Firefox) with addons like Privacy Badger and Ublock Origin.

    Use a VPN service for those times when a particular site is preventing access because its blocking tor nodes.

    The privacytools.io VPN list is a good start. Some VPN providers are including trackers into their VPN apps, so use Netguard to confirm a given provider's app is on the level (no 3rd party connections) before signing up.
    Is the Netguard + Orbot + Tor combination used primarily to anonymize the connection or to protect privacy? Because shared use with a VPN, which I have previously considered an essential tool for privacy protection, is ruled out.
    03-11-21 02:12 AM
  25. bb10adopter111's Avatar
    Is the Netguard + Orbot + Tor combination used primarily to anonymize the connection or to protect privacy? Because shared use with a VPN, which I have previously considered an essential tool for privacy protection, is ruled out.
    Yes. My biggest problem with Netguard, which I really like, is that I can't use it and a phone-based VPN at the same time. That's a big limitation. The only solution I know is to employ a VPN on a WiFi hotspot/router and only connect to the internet via WiFi. That works for me but wouldn't work for the vast majority of users who actually want their SIM-based data plan on their phone to work.

    Android either needs to let you "stack" two VPNs or build Netguard functionality directly into Android. I don't see either of those happening soon.

    Posted via CB10
    03-11-21 10:11 AM
32 12

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