Built for Business - Learn more about BlackBerry KEY2
  1. CrackBerry Question's Avatar
    I really miss having a BlackBerry (I'm currently stuck with a rather old hand-me-down Nexus 4, because I have a limited income and just don't see the point of spending money on something that I won't LOVE = anything other than a BlackBerry).

    I write a lot, so the physical keyboard was always the most important feature for me. I also miss the security/privacy that came with having a BlackBerry. I have been strongly considering buying a KeyOne, but I am currently on a family plan with Consumer Cellular.

    Based on past experiences (many years ago when my family switched over to Consumer Cellular), there was nothing that could be done to get my old BlackBerry Curve 9300 to function properly using Consumer Cellular - no MMS, no WiFi, no data. At the time, I just did without data/WiFi. But when my Curve started acting up, I was given an old Android phone, and have since then become embarrassingly addicted to certain PlayStore apps/games. And I've now become so accustomed to it that I don't think I can go back to not having internet access on my phone.

    I have read about many similar experiences in the years past (both on CrackBerry and elsewhere) with Consumer Cellular as a carrier equating to limited functionality of BlackBerrys. Something about BIS not being supported by carriers, or that BlackBerry locks their data to specific carriers, probably other problems that I don't remember...

    After looking at the newer BlackBerry models (that run Android!), I have found myself wondering if things might be different as far as trying to use one of the newer BlackBerrys (KEYone or KEY2 mainly) with Consumer Cellular...

    So I find myself venturing onto the CrackBerry forums now to ask:

    1. Has anyone tried using any of the newer BlackBerrys with Consumer Cellular? If so, what was your experience?

    1a. Are you able to use the internet / apps over data?
    1b. Are you able to use WiFi?
    1c. Do apps requiring internet connectivity seem to work properly?
    1d. Does MMS work?
    1e. Do PlayStore apps (in general) seem to work properly? Have you come across any apps that just don't work?
    1f. Did you experience any problems in other areas?

    2. Which version/variation(s) of the KEYone (BBB100-1, BBB100-3, BBB100-2, etc) or KEY2 would I need to purchase in order to use the device with Consumer Cellular in the US?

    3. Does it matter whether or not I get an international model? What difference does it make?

    4. Am I correct to assume that I need to buy a factory unlocked device (as opposed to a carrier unlocked device)?

    5. (In case I can't find anyone who has tried Consumer Cellular with a newer BlackBerry device) does anyone have any thoughts as to whether or not the newer devices would work with Consumer Cellular? Any thoughts or input would be appreciated.

    -Emily
    07-15-19 11:13 PM
  2. conite's Avatar
    CC uses the AT&T and TMO networks.

    You should be fine with a BBE100-5 (KEY² LE) or a BBF100-2 (KEY²). Avoid the international models.

    All KEY² devices are factory-unlocked.

    No promises on advanced features like Wi-Fi calling.
    jamesharmeling likes this.
    07-16-19 12:39 AM
  3. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    If you've been getting by on a Nexus 4 and budget is an issue then my suggestion would be the Key2 LE as conite suggests above.

    The factory unlocked KEYone 3/32 Silver Edition and the factory unlocked 4/64 Black Edition can be had less expensive and still considered decent upgrade from your current device. I use both a carrier locked AT&T 3/32 and factory unlocked BE 4/64 and I'm still happy for my BlackBerry fix.

    Don't buy the AT&T KEYone since not sure how well it will operate on your carrier. The early Silver 3/32 had some issues with screen popping out but it was fixed with later models. The Black 4/64 has no real issues that I'm aware of. Again, do not buy any international models.

    Once you receive your device, come back here so we can help verify you've got what you paid for as many reports of dishonest sellers. If that happens you should be able to return with Amazon or eBay so little bit safer. Good luck...
    07-16-19 06:32 AM
  4. Emily261's Avatar
    (I'm the same person who asked the original question; apparently I can't reply to my question without signing up)


    What is the reason for avoiding international models?
    07-16-19 03:06 PM
  5. Emily261's Avatar
    (I'm the same person who posted the original question; but CB kept demanding that I login when I tried to reply, so I created a profile.)

    Why should I avoid international models?


    Also, as far as the KEY2 LE, it doesn't have the capacitive keyboard - which is something that I *THINK* I would find useful. I mentioned that I write a lot, and while writing, I edit my writing A LOT (lots of cursoring, selecting text, cutting, copying, pasting). And I thought that the concept of having a "trackpad" essentially built into a physical keyboard sounded incredibly convenient.

    Is the capacitive keyboard as convenient in reality as it sounds?

    And what's the experience like writing/editing on the LE without a capacitive keyboard?


    -Emily
    07-16-19 11:34 PM
  6. conite's Avatar
    (I'm the same person who asked the original question; apparently I can't reply to my question without signing up)


    What is the reason for avoiding international models?
    The international models do not support all of the network frequencies used in North America. Coverage may be spotty depending on carrier and location.
    07-17-19 10:02 AM
  7. conite's Avatar
    (I'm the same person who posted the original question; but CB kept demanding that I login when I tried to reply, so I created a profile.)

    Why should I avoid international models?


    Also, as far as the KEY2 LE, it doesn't have the capacitive keyboard - which is something that I *THINK* I would find useful. I mentioned that I write a lot, and while writing, I edit my writing A LOT (lots of cursoring, selecting text, cutting, copying, pasting). And I thought that the concept of having a "trackpad" essentially built into a physical keyboard sounded incredibly convenient.

    Is the capacitive keyboard as convenient in reality as it sounds?

    And what's the experience like writing/editing on the LE without a capacitive keyboard?


    -Emily
    If you haven't used it before, you probably won't even think about a capacitive keyboard. All BlackBerry devices prior to the 2015 did not have that feature and people typed many novels on their devices.
    07-17-19 10:04 AM
  8. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    (I'm the same person who posted the original question; but CB kept demanding that I login when I tried to reply, so I created a profile.)

    Why should I avoid international models?


    Also, as far as the KEY2 LE, it doesn't have the capacitive keyboard - which is something that I *THINK* I would find useful. I mentioned that I write a lot, and while writing, I edit my writing A LOT (lots of cursoring, selecting text, cutting, copying, pasting). And I thought that the concept of having a "trackpad" essentially built into a physical keyboard sounded incredibly convenient.

    Is the capacitive keyboard as convenient in reality as it sounds?

    And what's the experience like writing/editing on the LE without a capacitive keyboard?


    -Emily
    Hi Emily and welcome to CrackBerry Forums and it’s eclectic members.

    As conite says, capacitive PKB isn’t for everyone’s preferences. For myself, I don’t prefer yet I have several devices that have it. The cost savings alone, for me, assures that when I replace my KEYOnes, I will opt for a non-capacitive model if available.
    07-17-19 10:19 AM
  9. Emily261's Avatar
    If you haven't used it before, you probably won't even think about a capacitive keyboard. All BlackBerry devices prior to the 2015 did not have that feature and people typed many novels on their devices.

    (I'd estimate that my Curve 9300 has upwards of 800 pages worth of writing typed out in the memos.)

    But the earlier BlackBerrys had a trackpad/trackball, which I liked using for editing text. None of the new BlackBerrys have a trackpad.

    I see the capacitive keyboard as the replacement for the trackpad. Having neither a trackpad or capacitive keyboard sounds like a handicap to me.


    I hate typing on my Nexus 4's VKB (and I've typed on family members' nicer phones VKBs and the experience is only SLIGHTLY less painful, so it's not just because my phone is old) for 2 main reasons:

    1. (The obvious reason) I like to feel the keys when I type.

    2. I HATE touching the screen of my phone to edit text. It slows me down because I have to take my fingers off the keyboard, and it is a massive pain trying to get the cursor in the correct place.


    In fact, I just dislike touching the screen of my phone in general (other than playing games) so a feature that allows me to touch my screen less is a huge plus.

    But, is that feature worth the extra cost..? IDK. That's what I'm trying to figure out.


    Any thoughts?


    (Also, I apologize in advance if I come across as argumentative; that is not my intent. I'm not trying to "prove a point"; I'm probing because I'm genuinely trying to figure out which phone would be best for me, without being able to try them out and compare them myself first. Any/all perspectives of BB users are helpful/appreciated to this end.)
    the_boon likes this.
    07-17-19 04:05 PM
  10. Emily261's Avatar
    If you've been getting by on a Nexus 4 and budget is an issue then my suggestion would be the Key2 LE as conite suggests above.

    The factory unlocked KEYone 3/32 Silver Edition and the factory unlocked 4/64 Black Edition can be had less expensive and still considered decent upgrade from your current device.

    Also, in response to your comment yesterday - budget both is and isn't an issue.

    Limited income, yes; but more to the point, I am extremely frugal and dislike making large purchases. However I view getting a BlackBerry as a quality of life improvement/investment. I have been setting money (so far $640) aside for the past 3-ish years for the express purpose of buying a new BlackBerry. While I would MUCH rather not spend the entire amount, I am determined to buy a BlackBerry that I will love and be happy with for AT LEAST the next 5 years, optimally more.


    I am probably going to be waiting for Black Friday / Cyber Monday to see if I can find one (whichever phone I decide on) at a decent discount.


    But first I need to figure out which one I want.
    07-17-19 04:23 PM
  11. conite's Avatar
    (I'd estimate that my Curve 9300 has upwards of 800 pages worth of writing typed out in the memos.)

    But the earlier BlackBerrys had a trackpad/trackball, which I liked using for editing text. None of the new BlackBerrys have a trackpad.

    I see the capacitive keyboard as the replacement for the trackpad. Having neither a trackpad or capacitive keyboard sounds like a handicap to me.


    I hate typing on my Nexus 4's VKB (and I've typed on family members' nicer phones VKBs and the experience is only SLIGHTLY less painful, so it's not just because my phone is old) for 2 main reasons:

    1. (The obvious reason) I like to feel the keys when I type.

    2. I HATE touching the screen of my phone to edit text. It slows me down because I have to take my fingers off the keyboard, and it is a massive pain trying to get the cursor in the correct place.


    In fact, I just dislike touching the screen of my phone in general (other than playing games) so a feature that allows me to touch my screen less is a huge plus.

    But, is that feature worth the extra cost..? IDK. That's what I'm trying to figure out.


    Any thoughts?


    (Also, I apologize in advance if I come across as argumentative; that is not my intent. I'm not trying to "prove a point"; I'm probing because I'm genuinely trying to figure out which phone would be best for me, without being able to try them out and compare them myself first. Any/all perspectives of BB users are helpful/appreciated to this end.)
    It's hard to answer your question, but it's very much a matter of preference and learning curve.

    I have a KEY², so I guess that's my answer.
    07-17-19 05:38 PM
  12. SteinwayTransitCorp's Avatar
    FROM CC website:
    CONSUMER CELLULAR SIM CARD

    With our FREE SIM card, you can connect a device you already own to Consumer Cellular service. To be activated on our service, your phone must be unlocked by your previous carrier, and be compatible with GSM network technology. Our SIM card most commonly works with phones used on AT&T or T-Mobile service. Inserting and activating a SIM card is quick and easy, and there are no activation fees.
    ADDITIONAL DETAILS FOR CONSUMER CELLULAR SIM CARD
    Key Features

    Use your own phone with our FREE SIM card
    No activation fees
    This all-in-one design is compatible with all SIM card sizes: Nano, Micro and Standard
    Your phone must be unlocked by your previous carrier
    Our SIM card most commonly works with phones previously used with Consumer Cellular, AT&T, or T-Mobile service, and may work with GSM smartphones from other carriers.

    Prices are applied at time of purchase, and include FREE activation.
    Devices are limited to stock on hand.
    07-17-19 06:09 PM
  13. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Also, in response to your comment yesterday - budget both is and isn't an issue.

    Limited income, yes; but more to the point, I am extremely frugal and dislike making large purchases. However I view getting a BlackBerry as a quality of life improvement/investment. I have been setting money (so far $640) aside for the past 3-ish years for the express purpose of buying a new BlackBerry. While I would MUCH rather not spend the entire amount, I am determined to buy a BlackBerry that I will love and be happy with for AT LEAST the next 5 years, optimally more.


    I am probably going to be waiting for Black Friday / Cyber Monday to see if I can find one (whichever phone I decide on) at a decent discount.


    But first I need to figure out which one I want.
    I believe the most important thing is to adjust your expectations. These new devices are manufactured in small quantities and have never really seen price cutting. Depending on where you’re at, inventory may already be limited to nonexistent.

    Since the devices are niche Android compared with high volume Android devices, the OS may also not meet your longevity requirement.

    The hardware is usually one year behind current Android version. This means better stability at the expense of longevity. I suspect three years is a more reasonable life expectancy for Key devices.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    07-17-19 09:40 PM
  14. Emily261's Avatar
    Since the devices are niche Android compared with high volume Android devices, the OS may also not meet your longevity requirement.

    I'm not sure I understand what you're saying.

    Do you mean that most likely the phone would no longer function properly in 3-ish years?

    Or simply that it would grow slower and not be up to par with the phones of the average consumer in 3 years?


    In the later case, I have a high tolerance for old technology not keeping up with the specs of current phones - especially if I LIKE my phone.

    I was quite happily using my Curve 9300 through July 2016 (other than my annoyance at my inability to use data/internet/WiFi because the device was incompatible with my carrier). And I only stopped using the 9300 because of some abnormal life circumstances outside of my control.
    07-18-19 12:11 AM
  15. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    I'm not sure I understand what you're saying.

    Do you mean that most likely the phone would no longer function properly in 3-ish years?

    Or simply that it would grow slower and not be up to par with the phones of the average consumer in 3 years?


    In the later case, I have a high tolerance for old technology not keeping up with the specs of current phones - especially if I LIKE my phone.

    I was quite happily using my Curve 9300 through July 2016 (other than my annoyance at my inability to use data/internet/WiFi because the device was incompatible with my carrier). And I only stopped using the 9300 because of some abnormal life circumstances outside of my control.
    I’m not saying the phone will stop functioning. You’re correct that I was speaking towards average consumer.

    In the case of wanting five years of service, I would only go with the Key2 for 6GB RAM and if available, the 128GB over the 64GB for the extra storage.
    07-18-19 07:55 AM
  16. the_boon's Avatar
    If your budget allows it, I'd go for the KEY2.

    I'm typing this on mine, and honestly I resort to tapping on the screen sometimes to edit text more often, than double tapping the capacitive keyboard to get the cursor mode (which would be always present with a trackpad).

    The reason being simply because sometimes, for me, it's faster to just hit the screen than double tap the keyboard, which doesn't 100% of the time engage the cursor mode the first time. Sometimes you need to double tap it twice, but never more than that.

    In some cases I'll use cursor mode if the app or web page I'm in will start acting weird if I start touching the screen all over the place.

    As far as the hardware itself between the three KEY devices:

    KEYone: smaller, glossy, capacitive keys

    KEY2 LE: a bit bigger, matte finished, non-capacitive keys

    KEY2: biggest, matte finished, capacitive keys

    The KEY2 offers the overall the best keyboard experience available, despite the clickier (and in some cases looser feeling) spacebar.

    The LE offers the best "simple/basic" mobile communication due to the polycarbonate build which offers exceptional reception/call quality and the light weight of the device makes typing long texts feel amazingly effortless

    The KEYone is the tank, it's heavy, has the smallest keys, but the best key backlighting, and has the best battery life of them (but not by much).
    07-18-19 09:59 AM
  17. whitieiii's Avatar
    I picked up my Key 2 on eBay for $375 shipped it has a crack in the corner but is still usable... it's been my favorite device until I got my S10 5G (for screen size and battery life not for 5G) the big screen on it is awsome but I miss the blackberry key2 physical keyboard when I use it.... I turned off the keyboard Swype on my Key 2 as I hate it but didn't want to buy an LE do to it having less ram and my Key 2 serves at my tiny tablet
    the_boon likes this.
    07-19-19 12:49 AM
  18. kovacsszandra's Avatar
    It's hard to answer your question, but it's very much a matter of preference and learning curve. https://hu.flatfy.com/

    I have a KEY², so I guess that's my answer.
    Would you recommend KEY²? I heard quite good things about it but in your own opinion, comparing it to alternatives, would you purchase it once again if you had to make the decision now?
    Last edited by kovacsszandra; 08-01-19 at 01:41 PM.
    07-20-19 07:49 AM
  19. conite's Avatar
    Would you recommend KEY²? I heard quite good things about it but in your own opinion, comparing it to alternatives, would you purchase it once again if you had to make the decision now?
    Without hesitation I would buy one today. I prioritise the typing experience over a huge display for media consumption and gaming.
    07-20-19 09:07 AM
  20. kovacsszandra's Avatar
    Without hesitation I would buy one today. I prioritise the typing experience over a huge display for media consumption and gaming.
    Thank you, great to hear that!
    07-21-19 04:30 AM
  21. the_boon's Avatar
    Would you recommend KEY²? I heard quite good things about it but in your own opinion, comparing it to alternatives, would you purchase it once again if you had to make the decision now?
    Yes, I still recommend the KEY2 even today.
    But I also really recommend the LE, which in some ways is better than the KEY2.
    Smokeaire likes this.
    07-21-19 09:21 AM
  22. TrumpetTiger's Avatar
    I'm not sure I understand what you're saying.

    Do you mean that most likely the phone would no longer function properly in 3-ish years?

    Or simply that it would grow slower and not be up to par with the phones of the average consumer in 3 years?


    In the later case, I have a high tolerance for old technology not keeping up with the specs of current phones - especially if I LIKE my phone.

    I was quite happily using my Curve 9300 through July 2016 (other than my annoyance at my inability to use data/internet/WiFi because the device was incompatible with my carrier). And I only stopped using the 9300 because of some abnormal life circumstances outside of my control.
    Hey Emily,

    In reading through this thread, it sounds like you are definitely certain you wish to go Android with your new device. Is that correct? I ask because you seem to really enjoy the Curve, and there are other options in the BB10 world if you are open to few Android games working, but if you're set on Android that's certainly a valid choice as well.
    07-23-19 05:50 PM
  23. kovacsszandra's Avatar
    Yes, I still recommend the KEY2 even today.
    But I also really recommend the LE, which in some ways is better than the KEY2.
    Thank you the_boon, I will take LE into consideration as well.
    the_boon likes this.
    07-26-19 03:53 AM

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