07-14-10 03:56 PM
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  1. Radius's Avatar
    There are a number of problems with the iPhone 4, some lesser known, but I don't think any of them warrant a recall.

    From what I remember, the problems are:

    antenna
    bad color when taking pictures (most likely software)
    bad proximity detector for the camera
    blemishes on some screens caused by glue under the screens not being allowed to dry properly

    And there were two others but I don't remember them. But as I say I don't think any of these need to be recalled.
    07-12-10 12:00 PM
  2. trophynuts's Avatar
    yeah i had heard of the other issues but i was under the impression that the antenna problem was the most common/severe.
    07-12-10 12:08 PM
  3. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    yeah i haven't heard an update on that CA suit in a week or so i wonder how its going.
    Same here. But I don't think people actually use their brains sometimes before stuff like this. This type of thing can take years to settle. And the fact that you can still take the phone back and get all your money back makes it even more ridiculous. Anyone who kept the phone after 30 days know what they have and they made the choice to keep it. Especially since Apple has already issued a statement about it the people in the suit are keeping the phone at their own risk.

    Verizon just settled the ETF class action suit after 2 years that paid everyone involved 87.50. What exactly do people think their entitled to?
    07-12-10 12:31 PM
  4. trophynuts's Avatar
    Same here. But I don't think people actually use their brains sometimes before stuff like this. This type of thing can take years to settle. And the fact that you can still take the phone back and get all your money back makes it even more ridiculous. Anyone who kept the phone after 30 days know what they have and they made the choice to keep it. Especially since Apple has already issued a statement about it the people in the suit are keeping the phone at their own risk.

    Verizon just settled the ETF class action suit after 2 years that paid everyone involved 87.50. What exactly do people think their entitled to?
    well your probably right for the most part. But i'm sure when an attorney see's a chance at suing a company like Apple all he sees is dollar signs. so i'm sure his thinking is clouded a little bit.
    07-12-10 12:33 PM
  5. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    There are a number of problems with the iPhone 4, some lesser known, but I don't think any of them warrant a recall.

    From what I remember, the problems are:

    antenna
    bad color when taking pictures (most likely software)
    bad proximity detector for the camera
    blemishes on some screens caused by glue under the screens not being allowed to dry properly

    And there were two others but I don't remember them. But as I say I don't think any of these need to be recalled.
    Agreed. Now, if you get a sizeable percentage catching fire and frying the USB port like from a couple days then that warrants a recall.
    07-12-10 12:37 PM
  6. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    well your probably right for the most part. But i'm sure when an attorney see's a chance at suing a company like Apple all he sees is dollar signs. so i'm sure his thinking is clouded a little bit.

    The longer the case, the more money for any lawyers involved. Even Apple's lawyers make money off this stuff too.
    07-12-10 12:38 PM
  7. Radius's Avatar
    Agreed. Now, if you get a sizeable percentage catching fire and frying the USB port like from a couple days then that warrants a recall.
    Yes, this is one argument for removable batteries in fact. If this was a serious problem then all you would need is a battery replacement and not a device replacement.

    But I suspect these are going to be rather rare occurrences and not the norm.
    07-12-10 12:39 PM
  8. trophynuts's Avatar
    07-12-10 01:16 PM
  9. evilhunter101's Avatar
    I think it's real simple, that a certain batch was constructed with improper grounding in the area having this problem. Apple should be able to figure out what this or these batch(es) were and then be able to replace the defective products on a case-by-case basis. In this way they would defeat the class action by assuming blame and making amends, and up-hold their good name and reputation a.k.a. "save face."

    All in all, no recall needed.
    07-12-10 01:58 PM
  10. trophynuts's Avatar
    Apple should be able to figure out what this or these batch(es) were and then be able to replace the defective products on a case-by-case basis. .
    wouldn't that in a sense be the same as a recall...??
    07-12-10 02:00 PM
  11. evilhunter101's Avatar
    wouldn't that in a sense be the same as a recall...??
    Yes and no, yes, because they would be replacing/repairing the defective devices. And no, because they wouldn't be required to send out a notification of any kind to customers stating the iP4 is being recalled. In other words, it would be entirely up to the consumer to have their device repaired or replaced. Therefore, it'd be basically an extension of the 30-day return window and as such (with no notification) it would likely be missed/over-looked by many consumers and not a true admission of fault which would help to save face.

    If it went down like that, and worked, it would be a PR masterpiece.
    07-12-10 02:07 PM
  12. trophynuts's Avatar
    lol i would put money on the fact that Apple is not going to use the word "recall" no matter what their solution is.
    07-12-10 02:10 PM
  13. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    wouldn't that in a sense be the same as a recall...??
    A case by case basis isn't a recall. Basically, if someone was having major issues and they could demonstrate the problem then it could be replaced. I think there are a lot of people that don't have the issue. I also think there are a lot of people that have the issue and it's really not apparent to them what the issue is. I mean people that roam this threads all day are certainly more aware of these things while normal consumers probably just chalked off a drop call here and there as AT&T's service. My wife didn't even know about the issue until I brought it up to her and it was 2 weeks after she had the phone. We're sitting at home watching tv and they briefly talk about it on the phone. Guess what my wife was doing? Browsing on her iPhone so she didn't even pay attention to the report. I think a lot of users are like that and then of course some are in denial.
    07-12-10 02:18 PM
  14. evilhunter101's Avatar
    Yup I agree, and if I worked for Apple that is what I'd be pushing for. If it does happen similar to what I stated some lucky guy/gal would be getting a fat raise/bonus for the thought.
    07-12-10 02:18 PM
  15. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    lol i would put money on the fact that Apple is not going to use the word "recall" no matter what their solution is.
    I agree there.
    07-12-10 02:19 PM
  16. trophynuts's Avatar
    so basically we have agreed on that whatever their solution is no matter if some may think its a recall. Apple is definitely not going to call it that lol
    07-12-10 02:27 PM
  17. xxxxpradaxxxx's Avatar
    No.

    My friends have not been able to recreate the no signal disorder show on these videos being flung around the interwebz.

    No need for a recall.
    07-12-10 02:30 PM
  18. pizzafootbal's Avatar
    Good question, but I think that would be a last resort for Apple. Either way, they are loosing trust. I think that a better idea would to be to release a fix, like the iPhone bumpers, for free. This would probably be the best option.
    07-12-10 02:36 PM
  19. Radius's Avatar
    I think it's real simple, that a certain batch was constructed with improper grounding in the area having this problem. Apple should be able to figure out what this or these batch(es) were and then be able to replace the defective products on a case-by-case basis. In this way they would defeat the class action by assuming blame and making amends, and up-hold their good name and reputation a.k.a. "save face."

    All in all, no recall needed.
    I don't think grounding is the issue, there's a supply voltage and a return voltage and that's about it. The fault lies in the battery itself.
    07-12-10 04:00 PM
  20. stuaw11's Avatar
    If were referring to the antenna issue it has nothing to do with the battery. Its simply causing interference with the antenna with the natural conductivity of your skin. Antennas are a specific length for a reason, and your body changes that length since its a natural conductor of sorts. Or bridging the antennas with your finger over the black bar. Either way its a touching it issue as a case or piece of clear screen protector/tape solves the issue if you dont want to use a case. Or simply return it, everyone is still under 30 days.

    If were referring to the lone iphone that burned out the dock connector then it was a defective part/a short.

    Neither warrant a recall as not a large enough number of devices are exhibiting either symptom. And neither is a fatal flaw rendering the device totally useless (or dangerous) where a recall is warranted
    Last edited by stuaw11; 07-12-10 at 06:36 PM.
    07-12-10 06:34 PM
  21. evilhunter101's Avatar
    I don't think grounding is the issue, there's a supply voltage and a return voltage and that's about it. The fault lies in the battery itself.
    I doubt there is any problem with the battery, as stuaw mentioned.

    But, it could be a grounding issue. Voltage will without a doubt take the path of least resistance. If the ground of the antennae is so weak that the voltage jumps across a finger then you may have a grounding issue. We have the problem in car audio all the time. For instance in high powered systems, such as mine that runs around 2600 watts around 13.6 volts RMS, if you don't tie your ground properly into the frame which would run back through the engine block and to the negative terminal of the battery (the ideal path of least resistance), the path taken could become the vehicle's body and then you see the reversal of a power surge. I.e, headlights dimming with every hit of the bass.

    This isn't a terribly good example of what the iP4 is experiencing but it is one I have first hand knowledge about. Simply put, if the ground was perfect, it could negate the effects of a person touching the affected area since the ground would still be less resistive than the human tissue and thus help the voltage take the correct route instead of jumping a finger. A finger that happens to be sweaty however, would likely still be less resistive than a proper ground. This could then, in theory, be an improper grounding issue.
    07-12-10 10:20 PM
  22. trophynuts's Avatar
    Why PR is so vital: Apple’s next move is a lose-lose Boy Genius Report


    and yet another posting on this matter today after the CR statements.
    07-13-10 02:38 PM
  23. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    Why PR is so vital: Apples next move is a lose-lose Boy Genius Report


    and yet another posting on this matter today after the CR statements.
    It's only a BGR post. Just their opinion on what Apple has to do. Obviously, it's only BGR's opinion and nothing that holds weight. Some of the thinking in the article is flawed and Apple has more than the 2 choice presented in the posting. Read the user comments.
    07-13-10 06:39 PM
  24. maz94protege's Avatar
    I think there should be a disclaimer for OS4.0. So regular 3G owners (like myself). Don't upgrade to it and have a laggy junk phone like I have now.
    Everyone knows of the iissues they are hearing about. Its a brand new design for the device and new OS. There's always bugs.

    Hopefully there will be another update for the software issues. But antenna design would have to go back to the drawing boards.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-13-10 08:32 PM
  25. phonejunky's Avatar
    The haters are running wild now. I like how the op tried to be nice about his hate though lol.
    07-13-10 11:01 PM
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