08-30-11 05:57 PM
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  1. Accidental Post's Avatar
    http://electronics.howstuffworks.com...n-battery2.htm

    Lithium-ion Battery Life and Death
    Lithium-ion battery packs are expensive, so if you want to make yours to last longer, here are some things to keep in mind:
    Lithium ion chemistry prefers partial discharge to deep discharge, so it's best to avoid taking the battery all the way down to zero. Since lithium-ion chemistry does not have a "memory", you do not harm the battery pack with a partial discharge. If the voltage of a lithium-ion cell drops below a certain level, it's ruined.
    Lithium-ion batteries age. They only last two to three years, even if they are sitting on a shelf unused. So do not "avoid using" the battery with the thought that the battery pack will last five years. It won't. Also, if you are buying a new battery pack, you want to make sure it really is new. If it has been sitting on a shelf in the store for a year, it won't last very long. Manufacturing dates are important.
    Avoid heat, which degrades the batteries.

    Another Source:

    Question: How do I take care of a Lithium Ion battery to prolong its life? Should I charge it frequently or drain it fully before charging it?

    Lithium ion batteries are particular about their operating conditions, and there are a lot of small things that can contribute to better quality of life. Li-ion batteries have a reasonably finite lifespan and can hold only a fraction of their original capacity after a few years, but things like operating temperature, how long the battery spends plugged in, how the battery is used, and the charge cycling you asked about can contribute to how long the battery lasts. If Michael Pollan had to sum up ideal Li-ion battery usage, he might say something like, "Use your battery. Not too much. Mostly for small apps."

    One of the worst things you can do to a Li-ion battery is to run it out completely all the time. Full discharges put a lot of strain on the battery, and it's much better practice to do shallow discharges to no lower than 20 percent. In a way, this is like people running for exercise— running a few miles a day is fine, but running a marathon every day is generally not sustainable. If your Li-ion powered device is running out of juice on a daily basis, you're decreasing its overall useful lifespan, and should probably work some charging stations into your day or change your devices' settings so that it's not churning through its battery so quickly.

    There used to be certain types of batteries whose "memory" of their total charge capacity seemed to get confused by shallow discharges. This is not, and never was, the case with Li-ion batteries. However, if you are using something like a notebook computer that gives you time estimates of how much longer the battery will last, this clock can be confused by shallow charging intervals. Most manufacturers recommend that you do a full discharge of the battery about once a month to help your device calibrate the time gauge.

    One common misconception is that Li-ion batteries will only count charge cycles if the battery is drained completely in one session; another is that the battery counts one charge cycle for every instance the device is unplugged and plugged in again. Neither of these is true—Li-ion batteries actually count charge cycles based on a 100 percent discharge even when it's summed over multiple sessions. For example, if you discharge a battery to 50 percent one day, charge it back to 100 percent, then discharge it 50 percent again the next day, that is counted as one "cycle" of the battery. So shallow discharges, in all these regards, are ideal for a Li-ion battery.

    On the other end of the spectrum, keeping a Li-ion battery fully charged is not good for it either. This isn't because Li-ion batteries can get "overcharged" (something that people used to worry about in The Olden Days of portable computers), but a Li-ion battery that doesn't get used will suffer from capacity loss, meaning that it won't be able to hold as much charge and power your gadgets for as long. Extremely shallow discharges of only a couple percent are also not enough to keep a Li-ion battery in practice, so if you're going to pull the plug, let the battery run down for a little bit.

    From another source:

    http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/fiv...ttery-life/289

    1: Keep your batteries at room temperature

    That means between 20 and 25 degrees C. The worst thing that can happen to a lithium-ion battery is to have a full charge and be subjected to elevated temperatures. So don’t leave or charge your mobile device’s battery in your car if it’s hot out. Heat is by far the largest factor when it comes to reducing lithium-ion battery life.
    2: Think about getting a high-capacity lithium-ion battery, rather than carrying a spare

    Batteries deteriorate over time, whether they’re being used or not. So a spare battery won’t last much longer than the one in use. It’s important to remember the aging characteristic when purchasing batteries. Make sure to ask for ones with the most recent manufacturing date.

    3: Allow partial discharges and avoid full ones (usually)

    Unlike NiCad batteries, lithium-ion batteries do not have a charge memory. That means deep-discharge cycles are not required. In fact, it’s better for the battery to use partial-discharge cycles.
    There is one exception. Battery experts suggest that after 30 charges, you should allow lithium-ion batteries to almost completely discharge. Continuous partial discharges create a condition called digital memory, decreasing the accuracy of the device’s power gauge. So let the battery discharge to the cut-off point and then recharge. The power gauge will be recalibrated.

    4: Avoid completely discharging lithium-ion batteries

    If a lithium-ion battery is discharged below 2.5 volts per cell, a safety circuit built into the battery opens and the battery appears to be dead. The original charger will be of no use. Only battery analyzers with the boost function have a chance of recharging the battery.
    Also, for safety reasons, do not recharge deeply discharged lithium-ion batteries if they have been stored in that condition for several months.


    5: For extended storage, discharge a lithium-ion battery to about 40 percent and store it in a cool place

    I’ve always had an extra battery for my notebook, but it would never last as long as the original battery. I know now that it’s because I was storing the battery fully charged. That means oxidation of lithium-ion is at its highest rate. Storing lithium-ion batteries at 40 percent discharge and in the refrigerator (not freezer) is recommended

    And for good measure:

    Lithium-Ion — or Li-Ion — batteries are in everything, and while they may not last forever, they’ll benefit from a little tender loving care. This time, five strategies that will help your users get the most out of the rechargeable batteries in their laptops and portable devices.

    Device manufacturers categorize batteries as “consumables.” They’re expected to wear out; it’s how they do what they do. The warranties provided by computer companies usually have different coverage terms for a laptop’s battery than for the computer’s other components. Even if you take the best possible care of your battery, its performance will degrade over time, and I’ve found that batteries older than two or three years aren’t good for much runtime at all.

    Accept the fact that your battery won’t last forever, no matter what.

    Oxidation in the cells can prevent an old battery from discharging properly, so even when left on a shelf, a battery’s lifespan shortens with time. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t some steps that you can take to ensure the Li-Ion batteries in your laptop or cell phone last as long as possible.

    Batteries are made to be used, so use them.

    Just like couch potatoes, batteries need exercise. The chemicals in Lithium-Ion batteries respond best to regular recharging. So if you have a laptop, don’t keep it plugged in all the time; go ahead and let it drain to about 40 or 50 percent of capacity, and then recharge your computer.

    The life of a Lithium-Ion battery can be measured in charge cycles. A charge cycle occurs when 100% of a battery’s capacity is used. Let’s say you use 50% of your laptop’s battery one day, charge it overnight, and then you use 50% of the battery again the next day. Even after charging it back up again, you’ll have only had one charge cycle occur. Most laptop batteries are rated for a useful life of at least 300-500 charge cycles, but high-quality, properly maintained batteries can retain up to 80% of their original life, even after 300 cycles.

    Periodically calibrate your battery.

    Most batteries that have a “fuel gauge”, like those in laptops, should be periodically discharged to zero. This can be accomplished simply by letting your computer run until it reports a low-battery state and suspends itself. (Do not let your computer deep discharge, as I’ll explain in the next item.)

    The gauge that measures the remaining power in your laptop is based on circuitry integrated into the battery that approximates the effectiveness of the battery’s chemical compounds. Over time, a discrepancy can develop between the capacity that the internal circuitry expects the battery to have and what the battery can actually provide. Letting your computer run down to zero every month or so can recalibrate the battery’s circuitry, and keep your computer’s estimates of its remaining life accurate.

    Don’t practice so-called deep discharges.

    Most laptops will suspend operation if the battery drains too low. Even if your computer goes to sleep, though, most batteries that are in good working order will still have a reserve charge available. This reserve will hold the computer’s working memory in state for a little while. A deep discharge has occurred when even that percentage of reserve power is used up. The computer will have turned off completely, and sometimes you’ll notice that it will have lost track of the correct date and time. Deep discharges will strain your batteries, so try to charge them frequently.

    Avoid exposing your battery to heat (when possible).

    Heat can overexcite the chemicals in your battery, shortening its overall lifespan. In fact, it’s been speculated that the biggest cause of early battery expiration is the heat that batteries can be exposed to when they’re stored in computers that are running off AC power. Laptops — especially modern multi-core machines — can get very hot when they’re plugged in, easily over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s hot enough that extended exposure will negatively affect your battery. If you want to be really protective, there’s nothing saying that you can’t pop the battery out of your laptop if you’re going to be within reach of a power outlet for a while.

    There may be times that you can’t help but expose your laptop battery to heat; you may live in a warm climate, for instance. You can, however, try and avoid exacerbating the issue. Make sure your laptop is well ventilated and that you’re not operating it on a surface that retains heat, even when you’re not plugged into mains power.

    Store your batteries properly.

    If your laptop or portable device isn’t going to be used for a while, you should remove its Lithium-Ion battery, if possible. Even if the battery can’t be separated from the device, it should be stored in a cool environment at about one-half charge. Cool temperature is recommended by experts because that can slow the natural discharge that batteries will undergo even when they’re disconnected from their device.

    I’ve seen some people go even further and recommend that spare batteries be stored in the refrigerator. I don’t think this is a very good idea; I’m concerned about condensation that might build up. Don’t put your batteries on ice, but keep them out of the sun.

    Ultimately, I believe that buying spare Li-Ion batteries is a losing game, because the batteries start degrading as soon as they’re manufactured. Usually those spare batteries spend most of their time sitting in a charger, losing useful life. If you need to be really mobile, you’re better off purchasing an adapter cable you can use with the power sources available in planes, trains, or autos. And, of course, by taking good care of the battery you already have.

    And yet another article on dischargin Lithium ION:
    Over-discharging Lithium-ion

    Li-ion should never be discharged too low, and there are several safeguards to prevent this from happening. The equipment cuts off when the battery discharges to about 3.0V/cell, stopping the current flow. If the discharge continues to about 2.70V/cell or lower, the battery’s protection circuit puts the battery into a sleep mode. This renders the pack unserviceable and a recharge with most chargers is not possible. To prevent a battery from falling asleep, apply a partial charge before a long storage period.
    Battery manufacturers ship batteries with a 40 percent charge. The low charge state reduces aging-related stress while allowing some self-discharge during storage. To minimize the current flow for the protection circuit before the battery is sold, advanced Li-ion packs feature a sleep mode that disables the protection circuit until activated by a brief charge or discharge. Once engaged, the battery remains operational and the on state can no longer be switched back to the standby mode.
    Do not recharge lithium-ion if a cell has stayed at or below 1.5V for more than a week. Copper shunts may have formed inside the cells that can lead to a partial or total electrical short. If recharged, the cells might become unstable, causing excessive heat or showing other anomalies. Li-ion packs that have been under stress are more sensitive to mechanical abuse, such as vibration, dropping and exposure to heat.

    I never ever let my battery completely discharge and here it is about 2:45 and I have 77% left.......made 4-5 calls multiple emails and about 40 texts......

    I think the articles speak for themselves.....
    Last edited by Accidental Post; 08-16-11 at 02:33 PM.
    lssanjose and LazyStarGazer like this.
    08-16-11 01:39 PM
  2. hockeyrulz's Avatar
    long-time BB user (last BB was a VZW Bold) who made the switch in April. After getting use to the phone, it has been great and the iphone is smooth as silk.

    But on the BB, I was a heavy user of keyboard shortcuts, so the iphone was a different platform for sure! Gradually got the apps I wanted/needed and have been very happy. Plus, the apps are mucho cheaper than for BB - which I had a whole bunch too. For iphone help, there are some really great books out there which I've found to give some really good tips. So going back to a BB? Nah, not going to.
    08-17-11 09:36 AM
  3. hockeyrulz's Avatar
    I charge my phone every night, use the phone pretty heavy during the day (FB, email, web, games) and might have the battery down to 50% by the end of the day. If I have used the phone sparingly for calls and emails (no games) then I mostly end up with 80% or so on the phone.
    08-17-11 09:39 AM
  4. trojanscott's Avatar
    Nothing new to really report. Battery life seems to be improving quite a bit after a few charges. STILL no luck with work email, but I'm dealing with a prima donna IT guy.

    Couple calls today, clarity fine, no drops.
    08-17-11 06:36 PM
  5. gregs87's Avatar
    I am on day 6 with mine. Still trying to figure out bat life but so far so good. What is so hard about your work email?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-17-11 06:41 PM
  6. trojanscott's Avatar
    I am on day 6 with mine. Still trying to figure out bat life but so far so good. What is so hard about your work email?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Really not sure. Tried to sync via Exchange, and it won't. I think it's something to do with our computer system not being set up to accept iOS. I think Accidental Post sent a "how to" about how to configure it on the IT side, I forwarded it on, but again, I have a drama queen for an IT guy.
    08-18-11 12:37 AM
  7. trojanscott's Avatar
    Going to keep updating my post, hope nobody minds much. I just want to share with people who may be on the fence about changing formats, because I sure was, and still am, to a point.

    First, I'm missing the LED notification. BUT... I'm wondering if my blackberry actually fed into compulsive behavior?! Do I need to see every text/email INSTANTLY? Has me thinking and wondering, is 5 minutes a big deal? Truth is, I get everything on the iphone in a timely manner. I'm hoping the IP5 will have an LED, but who knows. At the very least, I've read that iOS5 has a better notification system.
    But, BB's LED, which I didn't think I'd miss, I kinda do. Not enough to be a deal breaker though.

    Battery life seems to be improving. I will say that the apps on the iphone are awesome, but I also see how it's labeled a "toy" for kids and not for business. Seriously, some games are really addicting. (and, drain battery life) With that said, I think it's more the EASE and PRICE of the apps that make the phone perceived this way. You can download games on a BB, but are they as good? And are they .99 on average? NO. It's not the phone, it's the person. I'm thinking the novelty wears off eventually there, and I'll get more battery life after I'm done wasting an hour at night on fruit ninja. But, it's not a toy, it's seriously a well built, mini computer that runs really smooth and can do a whole lot. The games and such are just part of it.

    When I get my damn IT guy to get my work email synced, I'll post it here in all caps, and let everyone know how it goes.

    More updates as I have more experience and think about more pluses or minuses.
    GolfnCPA and garyf33 like this.
    08-18-11 10:52 AM
  8. garyf33's Avatar
    Going to keep updating my post, hope nobody minds much. I just want to share with people who may be on the fence about changing formats, because I sure was, and still am, to a point.

    First, I'm missing the LED notification. BUT... I'm wondering if my blackberry actually fed into compulsive behavior?! Do I need to see every text/email INSTANTLY? Has me thinking and wondering, is 5 minutes a big deal? Truth is, I get everything on the iphone in a timely manner. I'm hoping the IP5 will have an LED, but who knows. At the very least, I've read that iOS5 has a better notification system.
    But, BB's LED, which I didn't think I'd miss, I kinda do. Not enough to be a deal breaker though.
    I agree with you, I miss the LED since my phone needs to stay on silent when I'm at work and another thing I miss is the Blackberry's Profiles and the ability to have sound profiles for contacts. I've had my Iphone 4 for almost 3 months and still think about going back to a blackberry.
    08-18-11 11:27 AM
  9. ThePinkChameleon's Avatar
    thx for the continuing updates trojanscott !! I've been popping in & reading up on what your 'reporting' about lol. There is a lot to like about the iP4 but I'm still on the fence as well--thankfully I don't have an upgrade avail yet otherwise I'd be stressing on whether to pull the trigger or not lol !! I'm looking forward to the iP5 release as well---because like you, I think I'd miss the notification light also-BUT as you also pointed out-is that just part of the compulsive ocd addiction blackberry created

    Thx again for the updates....I will still be reading up on your progress--whichs definately sounds like its going very well. Hopefully your email exchg will get set by your IT guy SOON !! tell him to get his arse moving !! LOL


    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    08-18-11 11:51 AM
  10. Accidental Post's Avatar
    Your IT guy needs to enable Active Sync on the Exchange Server.
    08-18-11 12:12 PM
  11. trojanscott's Avatar
    Your IT guy needs to enable Active Sync on the Exchange Server.
    LOL, I know it. If I had administrative capabilities and passwords, I'd do it myself. He's just being difficult, and seriously, the guy works on 3 hours sleep a night between jobs. Not my issue, but I pick and choose my spots.
    08-18-11 12:30 PM
  12. Accidental Post's Avatar
    Smart man. Pay him more so he can quit the other 2 jobs. IT guys need money too
    08-18-11 02:00 PM
  13. LazyStarGazer's Avatar
    Things like this should be stickied.

    Then forum-wads could tell n00bs to do a search for it.


    HowStuffWorks "Lithium-ion Battery Life and Death"

    Lithium-ion Battery Life and Death
    Lithium-ion battery packs are expensive, so if you want to make yours to last longer, here are some things to keep in mind:
    Lithium ion chemistry prefers partial discharge to deep discharge, so it's best to avoid taking the battery all the way down to zero. Since lithium-ion chemistry does not have a "memory", you do not harm the battery pack with a partial discharge. If the voltage of a lithium-ion cell drops below a certain level, it's ruined.
    Lithium-ion batteries age. They only last two to three years, even if they are sitting on a shelf unused. So do not "avoid using" the battery with the thought that the battery pack will last five years. It won't. Also, if you are buying a new battery pack, you want to make sure it really is new. If it has been sitting on a shelf in the store for a year, it won't last very long. Manufacturing dates are important.
    Avoid heat, which degrades the batteries.

    Another Source:

    Question: How do I take care of a Lithium Ion battery to prolong its life? Should I charge it frequently or drain it fully before charging it?

    Lithium ion batteries are particular about their operating conditions, and there are a lot of small things that can contribute to better quality of life. Li-ion batteries have a reasonably finite lifespan and can hold only a fraction of their original capacity after a few years, but things like operating temperature, how long the battery spends plugged in, how the battery is used, and the charge cycling you asked about can contribute to how long the battery lasts. If Michael Pollan had to sum up ideal Li-ion battery usage, he might say something like, "Use your battery. Not too much. Mostly for small apps."

    One of the worst things you can do to a Li-ion battery is to run it out completely all the time. Full discharges put a lot of strain on the battery, and it's much better practice to do shallow discharges to no lower than 20 percent. In a way, this is like people running for exercise— running a few miles a day is fine, but running a marathon every day is generally not sustainable. If your Li-ion powered device is running out of juice on a daily basis, you're decreasing its overall useful lifespan, and should probably work some charging stations into your day or change your devices' settings so that it's not churning through its battery so quickly.

    There used to be certain types of batteries whose "memory" of their total charge capacity seemed to get confused by shallow discharges. This is not, and never was, the case with Li-ion batteries. However, if you are using something like a notebook computer that gives you time estimates of how much longer the battery will last, this clock can be confused by shallow charging intervals. Most manufacturers recommend that you do a full discharge of the battery about once a month to help your device calibrate the time gauge.

    One common misconception is that Li-ion batteries will only count charge cycles if the battery is drained completely in one session; another is that the battery counts one charge cycle for every instance the device is unplugged and plugged in again. Neither of these is true—Li-ion batteries actually count charge cycles based on a 100 percent discharge even when it's summed over multiple sessions. For example, if you discharge a battery to 50 percent one day, charge it back to 100 percent, then discharge it 50 percent again the next day, that is counted as one "cycle" of the battery. So shallow discharges, in all these regards, are ideal for a Li-ion battery.

    On the other end of the spectrum, keeping a Li-ion battery fully charged is not good for it either. This isn't because Li-ion batteries can get "overcharged" (something that people used to worry about in The Olden Days of portable computers), but a Li-ion battery that doesn't get used will suffer from capacity loss, meaning that it won't be able to hold as much charge and power your gadgets for as long. Extremely shallow discharges of only a couple percent are also not enough to keep a Li-ion battery in practice, so if you're going to pull the plug, let the battery run down for a little bit.

    From another source:

    Five tips for extending lithium-ion battery life | TechRepublic

    1: Keep your batteries at room temperature

    That means between 20 and 25 degrees C. The worst thing that can happen to a lithium-ion battery is to have a full charge and be subjected to elevated temperatures. So don’t leave or charge your mobile device’s battery in your car if it’s hot out. Heat is by far the largest factor when it comes to reducing lithium-ion battery life.
    2: Think about getting a high-capacity lithium-ion battery, rather than carrying a spare

    Batteries deteriorate over time, whether they’re being used or not. So a spare battery won’t last much longer than the one in use. It’s important to remember the aging characteristic when purchasing batteries. Make sure to ask for ones with the most recent manufacturing date.

    3: Allow partial discharges and avoid full ones (usually)

    Unlike NiCad batteries, lithium-ion batteries do not have a charge memory. That means deep-discharge cycles are not required. In fact, it’s better for the battery to use partial-discharge cycles.
    There is one exception. Battery experts suggest that after 30 charges, you should allow lithium-ion batteries to almost completely discharge. Continuous partial discharges create a condition called digital memory, decreasing the accuracy of the device’s power gauge. So let the battery discharge to the cut-off point and then recharge. The power gauge will be recalibrated.

    4: Avoid completely discharging lithium-ion batteries

    If a lithium-ion battery is discharged below 2.5 volts per cell, a safety circuit built into the battery opens and the battery appears to be dead. The original charger will be of no use. Only battery analyzers with the boost function have a chance of recharging the battery.
    Also, for safety reasons, do not recharge deeply discharged lithium-ion batteries if they have been stored in that condition for several months.


    5: For extended storage, discharge a lithium-ion battery to about 40 percent and store it in a cool place

    I’ve always had an extra battery for my notebook, but it would never last as long as the original battery. I know now that it’s because I was storing the battery fully charged. That means oxidation of lithium-ion is at its highest rate. Storing lithium-ion batteries at 40 percent discharge and in the refrigerator (not freezer) is recommended

    And for good measure:

    Lithium-Ion — or Li-Ion — batteries are in everything, and while they may not last forever, they’ll benefit from a little tender loving care. This time, five strategies that will help your users get the most out of the rechargeable batteries in their laptops and portable devices.

    Device manufacturers categorize batteries as “consumables.” They’re expected to wear out; it’s how they do what they do. The warranties provided by computer companies usually have different coverage terms for a laptop’s battery than for the computer’s other components. Even if you take the best possible care of your battery, its performance will degrade over time, and I’ve found that batteries older than two or three years aren’t good for much runtime at all.

    Accept the fact that your battery won’t last forever, no matter what.

    Oxidation in the cells can prevent an old battery from discharging properly, so even when left on a shelf, a battery’s lifespan shortens with time. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t some steps that you can take to ensure the Li-Ion batteries in your laptop or cell phone last as long as possible.

    Batteries are made to be used, so use them.

    Just like couch potatoes, batteries need exercise. The chemicals in Lithium-Ion batteries respond best to regular recharging. So if you have a laptop, don’t keep it plugged in all the time; go ahead and let it drain to about 40 or 50 percent of capacity, and then recharge your computer.

    The life of a Lithium-Ion battery can be measured in charge cycles. A charge cycle occurs when 100% of a battery’s capacity is used. Let’s say you use 50% of your laptop’s battery one day, charge it overnight, and then you use 50% of the battery again the next day. Even after charging it back up again, you’ll have only had one charge cycle occur. Most laptop batteries are rated for a useful life of at least 300-500 charge cycles, but high-quality, properly maintained batteries can retain up to 80% of their original life, even after 300 cycles.

    Periodically calibrate your battery.

    Most batteries that have a “fuel gauge”, like those in laptops, should be periodically discharged to zero. This can be accomplished simply by letting your computer run until it reports a low-battery state and suspends itself. (Do not let your computer deep discharge, as I’ll explain in the next item.)

    The gauge that measures the remaining power in your laptop is based on circuitry integrated into the battery that approximates the effectiveness of the battery’s chemical compounds. Over time, a discrepancy can develop between the capacity that the internal circuitry expects the battery to have and what the battery can actually provide. Letting your computer run down to zero every month or so can recalibrate the battery’s circuitry, and keep your computer’s estimates of its remaining life accurate.

    Don’t practice so-called deep discharges.

    Most laptops will suspend operation if the battery drains too low. Even if your computer goes to sleep, though, most batteries that are in good working order will still have a reserve charge available. This reserve will hold the computer’s working memory in state for a little while. A deep discharge has occurred when even that percentage of reserve power is used up. The computer will have turned off completely, and sometimes you’ll notice that it will have lost track of the correct date and time. Deep discharges will strain your batteries, so try to charge them frequently.

    Avoid exposing your battery to heat (when possible).

    Heat can overexcite the chemicals in your battery, shortening its overall lifespan. In fact, it’s been speculated that the biggest cause of early battery expiration is the heat that batteries can be exposed to when they’re stored in computers that are running off AC power. Laptops — especially modern multi-core machines — can get very hot when they’re plugged in, easily over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s hot enough that extended exposure will negatively affect your battery. If you want to be really protective, there’s nothing saying that you can’t pop the battery out of your laptop if you’re going to be within reach of a power outlet for a while.

    There may be times that you can’t help but expose your laptop battery to heat; you may live in a warm climate, for instance. You can, however, try and avoid exacerbating the issue. Make sure your laptop is well ventilated and that you’re not operating it on a surface that retains heat, even when you’re not plugged into mains power.

    Store your batteries properly.

    If your laptop or portable device isn’t going to be used for a while, you should remove its Lithium-Ion battery, if possible. Even if the battery can’t be separated from the device, it should be stored in a cool environment at about one-half charge. Cool temperature is recommended by experts because that can slow the natural discharge that batteries will undergo even when they’re disconnected from their device.

    I’ve seen some people go even further and recommend that spare batteries be stored in the refrigerator. I don’t think this is a very good idea; I’m concerned about condensation that might build up. Don’t put your batteries on ice, but keep them out of the sun.

    Ultimately, I believe that buying spare Li-Ion batteries is a losing game, because the batteries start degrading as soon as they’re manufactured. Usually those spare batteries spend most of their time sitting in a charger, losing useful life. If you need to be really mobile, you’re better off purchasing an adapter cable you can use with the power sources available in planes, trains, or autos. And, of course, by taking good care of the battery you already have.

    And yet another article on dischargin Lithium ION:
    Over-discharging Lithium-ion

    Li-ion should never be discharged too low, and there are several safeguards to prevent this from happening. The equipment cuts off when the battery discharges to about 3.0V/cell, stopping the current flow. If the discharge continues to about 2.70V/cell or lower, the battery’s protection circuit puts the battery into a sleep mode. This renders the pack unserviceable and a recharge with most chargers is not possible. To prevent a battery from falling asleep, apply a partial charge before a long storage period.
    Battery manufacturers ship batteries with a 40 percent charge. The low charge state reduces aging-related stress while allowing some self-discharge during storage. To minimize the current flow for the protection circuit before the battery is sold, advanced Li-ion packs feature a sleep mode that disables the protection circuit until activated by a brief charge or discharge. Once engaged, the battery remains operational and the on state can no longer be switched back to the standby mode.
    Do not recharge lithium-ion if a cell has stayed at or below 1.5V for more than a week. Copper shunts may have formed inside the cells that can lead to a partial or total electrical short. If recharged, the cells might become unstable, causing excessive heat or showing other anomalies. Li-ion packs that have been under stress are more sensitive to mechanical abuse, such as vibration, dropping and exposure to heat.

    I never ever let my battery completely discharge and here it is about 2:45 and I have 77% left.......made 4-5 calls multiple emails and about 40 texts......

    I think the articles speak for themselves.....
    Last edited by LazyStarGazer; 08-18-11 at 04:41 PM.
    08-18-11 03:22 PM
  14. Accidental Post's Avatar
    Quite frankly I don't even think MODS come in here some of the garbage people post to get a rise out of people should be nipped in the bud.........
    08-18-11 04:13 PM
  15. LazyStarGazer's Avatar
    :Waits for Duvi:
    08-18-11 04:42 PM
  16. Accidental Post's Avatar
    I think DUVI went back to a BB.........Sell Out
    08-19-11 09:36 AM
  17. trojanscott's Avatar
    One week update:

    Battery life is much improved after charging, and well, I hate to say it, less game play. ****, sorry, the damn games are fun, call me a kid. It's 9:35, and my battery reads 51%. Now, I did plug it in my car charger for my 10 minute drive home, but that's it. Couldn't have done that much. Even if I were at 30% at this time, I'd be happy. I had about 5 calls today, all clear and good, and texted quite a bit, read email, used "around me" app, (cool) and surfed the web a little too.
    What I'm really liking about the phone is just how I can do it ALL, no hangups, no lag, none of that. Now, I know, I was on the Storm, so of course, coming from something inferior, and maybe the new BB's are really great, but right at this moment, can't see myself changing back.

    I do miss the notification LED, as I stated. I do like the emails better on iphone. Yes, sorry BB, mail is not truncated, and just visually more appealing. I'm sure there are some things I may find I don't care for as I use it more, but right now, I love it.

    STILL do not have work email set up, and it's ticking me off. I hit my IT guy up, he said, "Monday." All damn week. I'm impatient to a fault, so it killed me to even wait till today to hit him up. Ugh.

    I can't wait for iOS5 at least, to check it out, and maybe the iPhone 5. If it has a rumored LED light, I see no way I'd switch back. Out of curiosity, when the 9860 hits VZW, I'll go play with it, but I don't think it'll wow me enough to leave.

    The only reason I'll switch back would be if my work doesn't let this experminet go all the way through, and they won't pay my monthly data fee. Now, I know most have to pay on their own, but if I can get a BB Touch that is TONS better than the Storm, and I can save 300-400 a year, that's too much for me to give up. But, I have a feeling they're going to allow the iphone, as a few others want to make the switch. I'll know more next week I guess. Damn IT guys.
    Caymancroc likes this.
    08-19-11 11:45 PM
  18. Accidental Post's Avatar
    Dude iOS 5 rocks......and go take your IT to lunch....we need love too....

    I hope your exchange server gets hooked up soon. The you will have NO reason to go back to BB.
    Last edited by Accidental Post; 08-25-11 at 08:18 AM.
    08-22-11 05:02 PM
  19. tchocky77's Avatar
    This thread should be stick-ied for all those considering trying an iPhone. Seriously. No BS fanboy-ism for either platform. Just honest-to-God straightforward reporting on the experience.

    If I'm not mistaken, the LED notification is coming for iPhone 4 and 5 with iOS5. It will use the camera flash for notification.

    I know you said you don't use your phone much for media, so it likely doesn't mean much to you, but the iCloud goes live with iOS5 as well. That's gonna be bigtime for users like me, as I use my phone A LOT as an MP3 player.

    Just some friendly suggestions about apps. Productivity wise, Evernote and Microsoft OneNote are big ones for me. Dragon lets me dictate texts and emails rather than typing them. DropBox is a cloud service that stores files of any type. HeyTell allows you to send voice messages (ala Voicemails) directly to other users. Skype is bigtime if you have any friends overseas, or are just opposed to paying long distance fees generally. Pandora is a big one for streaming music. I've also found that a lot of my favorite radio stations have iPhone apps that let me stream their channels directly. I'm a movie buff so the IMDB app is great. REDBOX is great, as is Netflix if you have a subscription. The Weather Channel. You know what that does. The iPhone has a nice GPS receiver and the Mapquest app gives me effective turn-by-turn navigation for free, though if you don"t care to spend a little money ($10-20), there are much more ornate NAV apps that give voice commands.

    oh!! Google Earth on the iPhone is more entertaining, and educational, I daresay, than most games I've played.

    All those are either free or inexpensive given what they do.

    At any rate,....glad you seem to be having a mostly positive experience. I love mine, but I'll be giving a QNX Bold a long hard look when it arrives.

    EDIT: Have you been able to try out FaceTime?
    trojanscott likes this.
    08-25-11 07:16 AM
  20. trojanscott's Avatar
    This thread should be stick-ied for all those considering trying an iPhone. Seriously. No BS fanboy-ism for either platform. Just honest-to-God straightforward reporting on the experience.

    If I'm not mistaken, the LED notification is coming for iPhone 4 and 5 with iOS5. It will use the camera flash for notification.

    I know you said you don't use your phone much for media, so it likely doesn't mean much to you, but the iCloud goes live with iOS5 as well. That's gonna be bigtime for users like me, as I use my phone A LOT as an MP3 player.

    Just some friendly suggestions about apps. Productivity wise, Evernote and Microsoft OneNote are big ones for me. Dragon lets me dictate texts and emails rather than typing them. DropBox is a cloud service that stores files of any type. HeyTell allows you to send voice messages (ala Voicemails) directly to other users. Skype is bigtime if you have any friends overseas, or are just opposed to paying long distance fees generally. Pandora is a big one for streaming music. I've also found that a lot of my favorite radio stations have iPhone apps that let me stream their channels directly. I'm a movie buff so the IMDB app is great. REDBOX is great, as is Netflix if you have a subscription. The Weather Channel. You know what that does. The iPhone has a nice GPS receiver and the Mapquest app gives me effective turn-by-turn navigation for free, though if you don"t care to spend a little money ($10-20), there are much more ornate NAV apps that give voice commands.

    oh!! Google Earth on the iPhone is more entertaining, and educational, I daresay, than most games I've played.

    All those are either free or inexpensive given what they do.

    At any rate,....glad you seem to be having a mostly positive experience. I love mine, but I'll be giving a QNX Bold a long hard look when it arrives.

    EDIT: Have you been able to try out FaceTime?
    LOL, thanks. I'm for sure not a fan boy of either, just want a phone that can work for me. I read through the forums quite a bit, and the fan boy stuff is a crack up. "BB are for biz adults, iPhones are toys for teens!" That about sums it all up. Yet the BB business guys are on this website 24/7, not really sure how much business they do. Iphone peeps can be just as bad. I'm neither. To be honest, so many people have iphones now, I found myself saying, "my BB can do that too," and trying to defend it. Really, not sure why I cared.
    I'm probably not the norm BB user, as my first was a Storm. AND I LIKED IT. Wasn't till the S2 and playing with other phones did I realize just what a pile it was. I want the full touch screen, period, so a keyboard was never an issue for me. I type just fine on virtual keyboards.

    Thanks for the suggestions! I do have a few of those apps already loaded. I'll go through some of the others and check them out.

    Okay, back to the updates.

    So, I do miss the LED notification light, but I will also say I'm missing it less. I really do feel like that LED light on my BB fed to compulsive behavior. As it is, my iPhone sits on my desk, and if someone sends a text or email, I know it right away. I've maybe missed two "instants," because I was away from my desk. No biggie, I just check the phone periodically. Compulsive behavior still there regardless!

    Phone quality is good. I haven't had dropped calls, and I like the "answer" and "end" buttons much better than the S2 buttons that sometimes didn't work. I'm not trying to blast BB here, but I'll blast the S2 all I can.

    I have had games stop. YES, I like some of the games. I'm wondering if signal issue, or whatever. Not often, but it has happened. I swear, I spent too much time playing "ninja fishing" just so I could finish it. My son digs the games. I don't consider this phone a toy, it's a phone that happens to have some addicting games on it.

    My email is great, I like the format a little better than BB. My work email is STILL NOT SET UP! UGH! My IT guy is killing me. But, with that said, work has been hectic lately, and I heard my boss's blackberry died, (another one!) and he got a new Curve, and my IT guy is having issues setting that up now. Maybe it's just my IT guy is out of it these past two weeks or so.
    Still, I won't give my final opinion on the iphone 4 until this is settled, and I can see how dealing with work emails, personal, etc, works out. I don't see issues here, but until I do it, won't know for sure.

    So, I do have a recent story, where I was really impressed with the iphone, and how fast and easy it is to use. My personal business is a DJ service. I do mostly weddings and small corporate events. On average, I probably do two gigs a month. I'm not a club DJ by any stretch, but can command a room on a microphone and am organized just enough. Not to mention people seem to like me, and I can sell myself well, so it's a nice side gig.
    I spent last Saturday in San Diego, CA, with a couple buddies of mine. Three 40 year old men, having a boys night out, away from wives and kids. Rented a room to crash in, and partied at the Gaslamp. Felt a little out of place in spots, I must say, but overall, it was fun, and the eye candy was nice, that's for sure. So, we're at this bar, and they have a DJ. I'm obviously always curious as to what they use for a DJ program, set up, etc. Well, as the night goes on, this guy is killing it. I don't have the time to practice the way I should, not with a full time career, four year old boy tugging at me non stop, a wife, you know... life. So, I'm thinking I want to know what he's playing, and in what order, and I'll use some of the same songs at my next gig. Not stealing really, just using some "suggestions." So, I open Shazam, and start tagging the songs. I tagged about 40 in two hours. It nailed every song but ONE. Now, I had a similar app on my S2, but it was laggy, and I didn't think did a good job. Here's where the iphone amazed me. I hadn't downloaded the app yet. I went to the app store, downloaded it, took about 30 seconds. Started tagging songs. After 5?, you need to upgrade to the Encore version to do it unlimited. Okay, $5, but whatever, upgraded, paid for it, and was going at it again in one minute. Crowded bar, TONS of people talking, and this thing still picked out the music and tagged it.
    I could have never done this with my S2, no way.

    I haven't tried facetime yet. Most of my buddies are now on androids, and the couple guys I know with iphones, well, I feel funny saying, "dude, I want to try face time!" But... I guess I should try it. My wife is digging the iphone, so maybe we get her one too, and then I'll have more of an excuse to use it.

    Will give more info as I think about it.

    EDIT: And I just thought about one other thing. If the LED notification is just the flash on the camera, and the ip5 doesn't have an actual LED light on the front, I doubt I'll care much. Don't know if I like the idea of having my phone face down at all times. Like I said before, I'm missing the BB led a little less by the day.
    Last edited by trojanscott; 08-25-11 at 11:59 AM.
    08-25-11 11:57 AM
  21. trojanscott's Avatar
    Oh, another thing: battery life on this phone is really very good. Every bit as good as my S2 or S1 before that, if not better. I can go a full day no problem now, depending on use. If my son doesn't get hold of the phone, I'd bet a day and a half wouldn't be a problem.
    08-25-11 12:18 PM
  22. trojanscott's Avatar
    Yet another update, and some crappy news regarding work.

    So, my work's official stance, at the moment, is, "we don't support the iphone at this time." Meaning, they could active sync it, but are choosing not to, due to security concerns. Seriously, it's an excuse to not figure it out, as we don't do anything to change the world in here. Unreal.

    With that said, my company of four owners: One doesn't care. One thinks we need to open the platform to all. Another has an iphone. The fourth, an Android, and wants things opened up as well. So, AT SOME POINT, they will. But for now, with me being the only person asking for email support, I'm getting no help.

    They will let me forward emails through a gmail account, I just didn't want to do that, have my responses come from it, etc.

    At this time, I don't think they'll reimburse my data plan, where they did for my BB. That's a decent chunk of money annually.

    On the other hand, right now, I like the iphone quite a bit. I want a full touch screen, and until VZW finally gets the 9850, I'm not changing. Even then, I think it may be too late, or I'll for sure wait for the ip5 to drop before making that decision. OVERALL, for not only personal use, but my side business, the iphone works better as a do it all phone for me. Now, granted, I wasn't using OS7 and was on the POS S2.

    For now, I'll stick with it, and see if I can get my work to change things, even though it may take some time.

    Still miss the LED, I do, but less and less. I think it was the addictive reaction BB helped to create, me looking for the blinking LED all the time.

    Typing on even the S2 was better than the Ip4. However, having only had this for a little over 2 weeks, I'm willing to stick with it, and I'm getting better.

    Battery life is great on this phone. Not sure why this is still an argument. I suppose if I were stranded somewhere for more than a day and a half, it would matter. Then again, with my iphone, I think it could do a better job of getting me out of there with a useful app. Didn't have that faith in my BB.

    I'll try another update for everyone maybe after a full month on this phone. As it stands, no issues with call quality, and it just works all the time. So do not miss battery pulls, or hourglass spins, or wanting to see a score update in less than say 2 minutes! (try in seconds.)
    08-30-11 05:57 PM
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