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07-15-11 01:26 AM
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  1. katiepea's Avatar
    this is the sort of stuff that scares me, it doesn't require anything from the user other than being close to it, your phone can't tell that it's not a real tower, and they can hear everything, and read everything that goes through it, doesn't matter what phone you have.
    07-08-11 05:23 PM
  2. ekafara's Avatar
    Katiepea: the most issue i have with security is locating my phone if it's lost or stolen. this seems to be of absolute dreamlike ease with android and ios, but if you lose your blackberry good luck.
    I can't remember from reading all of your other posts if you actually own a BlackBerry but this makes it seem like a no. BlackBerry Protect. An app made by BlackBerry for their phones. Some of the few things it can do: lock your phone, display a message on the screen, wipe your phone, use the gps to locate it, back it up and a few others. Good luck finding your BlackBerry? It's super easy. I've had to do it myself. Worked like a charm. I logged into the BlackBerry Protect website. Asked it to locate my phone and within a few seconds it told me where it was. I don't know how it works for the other phones but I have no idea why you think BlackBerry phones are hard to find.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    i7guy likes this.
    07-08-11 07:36 PM
  3. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    I find it unbelievable that people could still find fault with a calender application bug on IOS after the boatload of bugs, deficiencies and errors we are tolerating and living through with QNX.
    I didn't say I find fault with "a calender application bug", I said I find it troubling that there "is the constant pattern with the same issues"... Jailbreaking, DST, etc...

    And just because the "general consumer" doesn't care about it, doesn't make it a non-issue. Nor does another OS having issues, where's the logic in that? "I shouldn't care that I have a gun pointed at my head cuz there's three pointed at yours". Doesn't really make you safe...
    Last edited by TheScionicMan; 07-08-11 at 07:58 PM.
    07-08-11 07:54 PM
  4. olblueyez's Avatar
    The govt invents felonious security problems every day so that contractors can strip the American public of their tax dollars. These contractors provide what the govt wants. The govt wants a paranoid American public that is easy to control so that wall street continues to provide political appointments to those who are willing to swing politics into making them billions of dollars.
    Do low level and mid level people in general care about security? NO
    Does that mean billions of dollars will not be spent on secure devices? NO
    kbz1960 likes this.
    07-09-11 09:42 AM
  5. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    The govt invents felonious security problems every day so that contractors can strip the American public of their tax dollars. These contractors provide what the govt wants. The govt wants a paranoid American public that is easy to control so that wall street continues to provide political appointments to those who are willing to swing politics into making them billions of dollars.
    Do low level and mid level people in general care about security? NO
    Does that mean billions of dollars will not be spent on secure devices? NO
    I'm sure you don't bother to lock your car or house either, or did you fall for that scam too?? It's all about the govt, not the identity thieves that operate daily, right? You probably write your PIN on your ATM card because you have no cares about security. For intelligent people, security is a forethought and not ignored until after they've become a victim.

    Smart people care about security, ignorant people don't...
    07-09-11 01:08 PM
  6. olblueyez's Avatar
    The point of my post was that people claiming consumers will dictate that the iPhone replace more secure devices in the corporate and government sectors is light years from realistic.
    You caught up now Kiddo?
    Just so we are crystal, you said a bunch of things that I did not. You may wanna check out www.RIF.org.
    Last edited by olblueyez; 07-09-11 at 04:57 PM.
    07-09-11 04:48 PM
  7. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    I'm not your kiddo, buddy...

    We should all focus on the "coprorations" and the "government" to the exclusion of all other things... Gotcha... Sounds like you should add an additional layer of tinfoil to your bunker.
    07-09-11 05:23 PM
  8. araLe-tot's Avatar
    Since everyone wants to rip me. What makes the smartphone such a security breach risk over the laptop?

    I am not a tech guy so it is a serious question. Edumacate me.
    I would think because of the portability of any mobile device. It is much easier to forget a smartphone somewhere than a laptop. Only because of their size and the amount of smartphones vs laptops 'in the wild' - not everyone can afford a (just going super cheap end here) cheap netbook but a cheap comms device (which will most likely be any form of a smartphone nowadays) is almost always ideal.

    And just because the "general consumer" doesn't care about it, doesn't make it a non-issue. Nor does another OS having issues, where's the logic in that? "I shouldn't care that I have a gun pointed at my head cuz there's three pointed at yours". Doesn't really make you safe...
    It just makes me feel better LoL ^_^;
    07-12-11 09:18 PM
  9. katiepea's Avatar
    security is nearly entirely a moot point. it doesn't sell phones, it never will sell phones, and there is no such thing as security anyway. considering the mobility of the products, the highest security risk is someone getting actual control over your device. and that won't ever change.
    07-12-11 09:23 PM
  10. h20work's Avatar
    security is nearly entirely a moot point. it doesn't sell phones, it never will sell phones, and there is no such thing as security anyway. considering the mobility of the products, the highest security risk is someone getting actual control over your device. and that won't ever change.
    Wow, just wow....

    You are wrong on so many things and on so many levels. Last I checked, you aren't the end all be all for the consumer voice. I'm a consumer and I do actually care about security. I am not paranoid about it, nor do I go to any extra lengths to protect myself.

    I'll skip all the arguing back and forth and just say: prove to everyone else that BlackBerry is a high risk platform.

    PS, when someone calls out you BS and you say that's not the point doesn't help your case.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Jake Storm likes this.
    07-12-11 10:01 PM
  11. katiepea's Avatar
    Wow, just wow....

    You are wrong on so many things and on so many levels. Last I checked, you aren't the end all be all for the consumer voice. I'm a consumer and I do actually care about security. I am not paranoid about it, nor do I go to any extra lengths to protect myself.

    I'll skip all the arguing back and forth and just say: prove to everyone else that BlackBerry is a high risk platform.

    PS, when someone calls out you BS and you say that's not the point doesn't help your case.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Android will have 50% market share by years end, clearly security isn't a front runner for consumers

    I also didn't say bb was a high risk platform, so don't claim what I say is bs when you seem to not be able to read
    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-12-11 10:15 PM
  12. h20work's Avatar
    Android will have 50% market share by years end, clearly security isn't a front runner for consumers

    I also didn't say bb was a high risk platform, so don't claim what I say is bs when you seem to not be able to read
    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    So much for not arguing...

    I guess I should have been much more clear with the bs you were spewing. BB Protect allows you to locate, wipe, etc. Better than dream like since it exists and actually works. I'm sure you have tried it right?

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-12-11 10:29 PM
  13. ekafara's Avatar
    Well since this thread is still here:

    Apple's top patent lawyer quits as legal battles heat up

    Apples chief patent lawyer will soon leave the company amid ongoing legal battles with Samsung and*HTC,*among others. Attorney Richard Chip Lutton Junior currently manages Apples extensive portfolio of patents, but not for much longer according to a report on Tuesday from*Reuters. The lawyer is leaving Apple for reasons unknown according to Reuters seemingly well-placed anonymous source, and B. J. Watrous will replace him. Watrous, formerly Hewlett-Packards deputy general counsel, is already listed as Vice President & Chief IP Counsel for Apple on his LinkedIn profile. Apple has sued a number of companies around the world recently for patent infringement, including Samsung, HTC and Nokia. HTC responded to Apples most recent patent complaint by stating that the company should focus on competing in the market instead of constantly suing its competitors.
    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-13-11 02:24 AM
  14. Tnis's Avatar
    Android will have 50% market share by years end, clearly security isn't a front runner for consumers ...
    Why are you so concerned about what "sells phones"? "Consumers" thought Enron and Maddoff were the cat's meow, too. Were you pleased to report that security didn't matter then, too? I'll clarify: to idiots security doesn't matter. I'm a consumer, too. To me, security matters. To intelligent consumers security matters.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Last edited by Tnis; 07-13-11 at 08:16 AM.
    07-13-11 07:33 AM
  15. Phil DeLong's Avatar
    Wow, just wow....

    You are wrong on so many things and on so many levels. Last I checked, you aren't the end all be all for the consumer voice. I'm a consumer and I do actually care about security. I am not paranoid about it, nor do I go to any extra lengths to protect myself.

    I'll skip all the arguing back and forth and just say: prove to everyone else that BlackBerry is a high risk platform.

    PS, when someone calls out you BS and you say that's not the point doesn't help your case.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com

    While I don't agree with making it a blanket statement like he did, I do have to agree that a large section of the consumer market doesn't even consider security of a phone when they buy it.
    07-13-11 07:41 AM
  16. i7guy's Avatar
    security is nearly entirely a moot point. it doesn't sell phones, it never will sell phones, and there is no such thing as security anyway. considering the mobility of the products, the highest security risk is someone getting actual control over your device. and that won't ever change.
    You probably don't have locks on your door because LA is such a safe place to live. Right?

    Security isn't moot to me, it's one reason I still have my blackberry and feel safe doing my banking on it.
    07-13-11 07:46 AM
  17. kbz1960's Avatar
    I'm not your kiddo, buddy...

    We should all focus on the "coprorations" and the "government" to the exclusion of all other things... Gotcha... Sounds like you should add an additional layer of tinfoil to your bunker.
    If you don't think government is a threat or is not ripping off the public then I don't know what to say. Everything is fine, they will take care of us.....not.

    No I don't wear a tin foil hat, that's for aliens.
    07-13-11 07:50 AM
  18. Rickroller's Avatar
    To intelligent consumers security matters.
    I'd also say intelligent consumers don't leave their internet banking passwords on their phone..with a roadmap of where to find them in case someone steals their phone. If you are that (for lack of a better word) ********..then perhaps you do need to worry about nuking your phone from orbit if you think it's been stolen (when in fact..it's probably fallen between the seat cushions).

    Personally..i'd LOVE to see someone use my phone and access my personal bank info. Helll..i'll even GIVE you my phone, unlocked, with my banks website open up just to watch.

    I think the paranoid people are the ones who think criminals are somehow tailing them on a daily basis in some tech van disguised as a Flower delivery truck..using computers to remote tap into your cellphone...to gain access to your bank account..which contains all of $315 (maybe $1200 for you highrollers). Then..when you least expect it..someone is going to "bump" into you...and make the "switch"..taking your cellphone and replacing it with a dummy version..and then high tail it out of there all the while laughing evil-like (MUWAHAHAHA) while they head to your nearest ATM so they can get enough money to buy a Starbucks..

    At least..that's what I'M worried about
    07-13-11 08:04 AM
  19. kbz1960's Avatar
    I'd also say intelligent consumers don't leave their internet banking passwords on their phone..with a roadmap of where to find them in case someone steals their phone. If you are that (for lack of a better word) ********..then perhaps you do need to worry about nuking your phone from orbit if you think it's been stolen (when in fact..it's probably fallen between the seat cushions).

    Personally..i'd LOVE to see someone use my phone and access my personal bank info. Helll..i'll even GIVE you my phone, unlocked, with my banks website open up just to watch.

    I think the paranoid people are the ones who think criminals are somehow tailing them on a daily basis in some tech van disguised as a Flower delivery truck..using computers to remote tap into your cellphone...to gain access to your bank account..which contains all of $315 (maybe $1200 for you highrollers). Then..when you least expect it..someone is going to "bump" into you...and make the "switch"..taking your cellphone and replacing it with a dummy version..and then high tail it out of there all the while laughing evil-like (MUWAHAHAHA) while they head to your nearest ATM so they can get enough money to buy a Starbucks..

    At least..that's what I'M worried about
    LOL, I agree with you. People have to take responsibility for their own security too. BTW they don't even have to bump into you and make an exchange. There are gadgets that can scan even your credit card just by being close enough.
    07-13-11 08:08 AM
  20. Tnis's Avatar
    I'd also say intelligent consumers don't leave their internet banking passwords on their phone ...
    Why not? I do on my BlackBerry; it has AES (encryption). Pawn2Own can't even access it when my phone is locked (unless it guesses my password).

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-13-11 08:24 AM
  21. Rickroller's Avatar
    Why not? I do on my BlackBerry; it has AES (encryption). Pawn2Own can't even access it when my phone is locked (unless it guesses my password).
    Your telling me you SERIOUSLY can't remember your internet banking password?..and have to go to your phone to see what it is? As Whitney Houston would say..."Crack is whack!"

    If someone in front of me at the ATM had to pull out their phone..unlock it..scroll around to their Password keeper..unlock THAT..and then find their debit card PIN..I would have to punch them. "I'm not afraid to hit an old guy in public" (ala The Hangover)
    Last edited by Rickroller; 07-13-11 at 08:31 AM.
    lssanjose likes this.
    07-13-11 08:28 AM
  22. Tnis's Avatar
    All my passwords (and account numbers) are on my phone. And I don't have or use a debit card; those have piddly daily limits.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    07-13-11 08:34 AM
  23. Rickroller's Avatar
    All my passwords (and account numbers) are on my phone. And I don't have or use a debit card; those have piddly daily limits.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Aye..I hear that. Although those limits are also a security measure so someone can't drain your bank account all in one sitting.
    07-13-11 09:05 AM
  24. Economist101's Avatar
    You are wrong on so many things and on so many levels. Last I checked, you aren't the end all be all for the consumer voice. I'm a consumer and I do actually care about security. I am not paranoid about it, nor do I go to any extra lengths to protect myself.
    This makes you the exception, not the rule. Sure, there are some people that care about security, just like there are some people that own WP7 devices. But let's be realistic. If security were important to a majority of consumers, do you think Android would sell as many devices as it does? Do you think BlackBerry share would be falling? It's not about anyone here speaking for consumers; it's about understanding consumer attitudes by examining consumer behavior.

    As an example, here in the U.S. it's hard to believe a significant percentage of the population really cares about what they eat or how much exercise they get when the obesity rate keeps climbing. It's also hard to believe people care about making sound financial decisions when credit card balances keep climbing and Best Buy keeps extending their "no interest for N number of years" financing offers. I've seen these offers for as long as 3 years, which only makes financial sense for a lender if a good number of people are failing to pay their balances in that time, thus allowing the lender to charge interest on the purchase going back to the purchase date at 20+%. It's also why despite people here claiming to "love underdogs" in sports, the best TV ratings are generally for the traditional powers. Put simply, you learn to ignore what people say, and instead look at how they behave.
    07-13-11 09:30 AM
  25. Economist101's Avatar
    Why are you so concerned about what "sells phones"?
    Probably because RIM is in the phone business, and selling phones is rather critical to their long-term survival. I would think this was self-explanatory. It's like asking Toyota why they're so concerned with what "sells cars."

    "Consumers" thought Enron and Maddoff were the cat's meow, too.
    One, "consumers" weren't Enron's audience; shareholders and analysts were. Enron duped a lot of financial people who couldn't comprehend Enron's complicated accounting.

    Two, you offer up these two exceptions as proof of what? No one ever claimed consumers were always right, or even right at all. But as a business you don't get credit for doing the right thing as consumers screw things up; the idea is to find an audience for your product.

    I'll clarify: to idiots security doesn't matter. I'm a consumer, too. To me, security matters. To intelligent consumers security matters.
    This would matter if "% of sales to intelligent people" was a metric in RIM's financial results, but it's not. You get no credit for being the choice of "intelligent" people if there aren't enough intelligent people around to sustain growth. We're talking about product sales, not the incoming freshman class at Harvard; the idea is to move lots of product, not prove that your customers are smarter than others.
    lssanjose likes this.
    07-13-11 09:46 AM
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