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  1. awb715's Avatar
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    #26  

    Default

    im on the unlimited plan. is that the private one?


    Freedom is not free
  2. Blacklatino's Avatar

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    PM me. :)
    #27  

    Default

    It's a lot simpler if you(can) purchase your own Blackberry. I did and added a "Rule" that sends all my Group wise (work) e-mail to my personal berry and I'm on BIS.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
  3. katieyhip's Avatar
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    #28  

    Default BIS/BES - 2 questions

    So am I correct in understanding that BIS is secure? Also, how do you know which one you are on?
  4. Username00089's Avatar
    CrackBerry Genius of Geniuses

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    #29  

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    Quote Originally Posted by katieyhip View Post
    So am I correct in understanding that BIS is secure? Also, how do you know which one you are on?
    If you're paying $30 a month you're most likely on BIS. If you're paying $45
    you're on BES.
  5. BlkBryAddict's Avatar
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    #30  

    Default

    From what I know I heard an attorney say that Verizon can keep the actual text messages for 3 days but they get erased after that. Then only the fact that one person texted the other is kept.
  6. LawP's Avatar
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    #31  

    Default

    I remember reading a NPR talking point that verizon kept all sms and mms messages for 15 days as SOP and reserve the right to store any customers texts forever without informing you. I would assume only in special circumstances, ie a warrant wiretap or other type of formal investigation. I could have either read it wrong or remembered it wrong, I'll try and find it and get back.

    Apparently police can request all text messages with out a warrant as well, the Justice department considers them public domain and because they are sent over a third party network there is no expectation of privacy. US CODE: Title 18,2703. Required disclosure of customer communications or records

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Last edited by LawP; 09-10-2009 at 08:28 PM. Reason: Additional info.
  7. Baca67's Avatar
    CrackBerry Newbie

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    #32  

    Default

    Okay, read all of these and some answers seem a bit vague. So if you will indulge my question...I own my own BB, I connect via BIS, my company runs its email through Microsoft Exchange. Who and what can anyone see? Thanks
    Last edited by Baca67; 12-17-2009 at 01:24 PM. Reason: spelling error
  8. Wes_dark's Avatar
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    #33  

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LawP View Post
    I remember reading a NPR talking point that verizon kept all sms and mms messages for 15 days as SOP and reserve the right to store any customers texts forever without informing you. I would assume only in special circumstances, ie a warrant wiretap or other type of formal investigation. I could have either read it wrong or remembered it wrong, I'll try and find it and get back.

    Apparently police can request all text messages with out a warrant as well, the Justice department considers them public domain and because they are sent over a third party network there is no expectation of privacy. US CODE: Title 18,2703. Required disclosure of customer communications or records

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com


    unless you're texting about a serious criminal offense, I doubt they care.

    Think about all the text messages a day that get sent, you really think they monitor every single one?
  9. mookish's Avatar
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    #34  

    Default

    Here's my take. I own my device and pay for my plan via att. I elected to connect to my er's BES for corp email. Therefore ONLY company email should be subject to be logged and viewed. All my PERSONAL email and SMS, MMS, PIN Phone calls, web activity is my business only. Not saying that they can't see these things, but they shouldn't be looking as it's my hardware and my personal communication and not company related. So if I say something they don't like via one of my personal routes like gmail or sms, they'd better think of a different excuse to fire me.
  10. ComfortablyNumb's Avatar
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    it on the other guy =D
    #35  

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lorna_hunkins View Post
    Are messages that I send using blackberry messenger recorded anywhere like SMS messages on my cellular providers servers?
    Wow. That doesn't sound suspicious. I wonder what you have to hide. Are you also concerned about microchips implanted in your skin? Poison in the water? A b*mb in your car? lol.

    No, the carriers don't track your bbm.
    If I turn into another. Dig me up from under what is covering the better part of me. Sing this song. Remind me that we'll always have eachother when everything else is gone.
  11. Baca67's Avatar
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    #36  

    Default

    So here is what I am taking away from this thread. Since I connect to my company's email through my Blackberry that I pay for I am at the same time losing my right to privacy because I wanted to receive my emails in a timely fashion. And even though I connect through BIS they could potentially monitor all messaging types. This conclusion is correct, yes?
  12. mookish's Avatar
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    #37  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baca67 View Post
    So here is what I am taking away from this thread. Since I connect to my company's email through my Blackberry that I pay for I am at the same time losing my right to privacy because I wanted to receive my emails in a timely fashion. And even though I connect through BIS they could potentially monitor all messaging types. This conclusion is correct, yes?
    I'm in the same boat and while this "may" be true, I still feel comfortable using my bis email, sms, mms, phone, im/bbm services in any way that I want. Just because they can be monitored doesn't mean that is should be or that they have a right to. BES is all they should be concerned with in the case that it's my device and my plan.
  13. sla6amk's Avatar
    CrackBerry Newbie

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    #38  

    Default How to know if your BB is registered on a BES?

    How does someone find out if there BB is registered on a BES? My phone for example has not been given to me by a company, but is on my cousin's name on the phone carrier site. He doesnt have my PIN or model number. Is it possible for my BB phone to be on the BES?
  14. F0nage's Avatar
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    #39  

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CajunTechie View Post
    I called both my provider (T-Mobile) and RIM to find the answer to this question and here's what I was told:

    1. If you are on BES then both your text messages AND your BB Messenger messages can and probably are being recorded somewhere.

    2. If you are on BIS then your SMS messages are still being retained by your provider (it's the law, I believe) but BB Messenger is secure.

    That is what RIM and T-Mobile told me today. Hope it helps.

    Anthony
    BB Messenger still gets routed through RIM's NOC. They have the ability to look at all the traffic whether you're on BIS or BES and their EULA says they will rat you out without a court order. So no, it's not secure, it's shooting fish in a barrel. About the only entity that can't see what goes over BBM is your carrier.
    Last edited by F0nage; 05-21-2010 at 08:38 AM.
    The lesson we learned from iPhone: People who can't walk and chew gum at the same time don't need a phone that can multitask...nobody likes a phone to be smarter than they are Go RIM, Go BlackBerry. BlackBerry rules!
  15. sickboy719's Avatar
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    #40  

    Default

    Anything you send or receive on any device could possibly be read by someone else, whether its your BES admin, law enforcement subpoena for your sms records, or your wife picking your phone up off the counter.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
  16. F0nage's Avatar
    CrackBerry Master

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    #41  

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    Not so. If you use encryption properly nobody will be able to read it except the people who have the keys.
    The lesson we learned from iPhone: People who can't walk and chew gum at the same time don't need a phone that can multitask...nobody likes a phone to be smarter than they are Go RIM, Go BlackBerry. BlackBerry rules!
  17. sickboy719's Avatar
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    #42  

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    I'm just saying, if the things you're sending on your phone could have negative consequences you might be better off saying them in person.

    I bet when Tiger Woods went to bed that night he didn't imagine that he'd be waking up in the neighbor's yard being chased by a golf club wielding supermodel.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
  18. F0nage's Avatar
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    #43  

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    Quote Originally Posted by sickboy719 View Post
    I'm just saying, if the things you're sending on your phone could have negative consequences you might be better off saying them in person.
    Sound advice indeed.
    The lesson we learned from iPhone: People who can't walk and chew gum at the same time don't need a phone that can multitask...nobody likes a phone to be smarter than they are Go RIM, Go BlackBerry. BlackBerry rules!
  19. canadiense's Avatar
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    #44  

    Angry Privacy Schmivacy

    Quote Originally Posted by amazinglygraceless View Post
    Not really. The company issues the device and has every right
    to set the policy of use. And they have every right to ensure
    that the policy is being followed. BES Admins are not nosy or
    nefarious in any way. They are doing their job.

    If an EE decides not to follow, or attempts to circumvent known
    company policy, then they deserve what ever comes their way.

    You want privacy, buy your own BB. Simple.
    "Every right"? "Deserve whatever comes their way"? [sic]

    What are you ... a mall cop?

    If your job requires that you travel, should 'the company' be given the right to place a video camera in your hotel room with a full video and audio of what goes on? What's the difference? The company 'issued' me the hotel room. The company 'issued' a credit card with which to pay for the hotel room. Shouldn't that fall under the same rules?

    What a load of crap. If they want to lock it down, leave it in your desk. Keep screwing it up.
  20. McStephen's Avatar
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    #45  

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    I wonder what employer's policies generally are regarding non-professional activities of any kind during work time, and if that may, perhaps be a more meaningful question here, notwithstanding weather or not we can be observed. As a casual observer of recent years, I've noticed a remarkable trend in the amount of personal energy and creativity being wasted on the pursuit of various ways of avoiding detection while we're doing what we're not supposed to be doing! For the most part, privacy rights apply to private life. When someone is paying you for something, they have a right to make sure they're getting what they're paying for. That seems pretty straight forward. Any one of us would demand the same ourselves. If they would loan you the use of some of their property, they have a right to place conditions on its use and return, and you have the right to refuse their property. If you're doing what you're supposed to be doing, but your employer isn't, then a jury of your peers will most likely see it your way, and by far most employers are very alert to that fact. That's why all the those big enough to afford it, have full time legal staff. Simply don't use employer time or property to conduct any personal business unless specifically permitted in writing or in front of reliable witnesses, and then it will most likely never, ever be a problem. Failing that, the risk is all yours. In the professional world it really is that simple, with very few exceptions. (Most of those few exceptions are themselves to some degree contrivances.) Look! No additional software, or panic needed! (Just saying.)
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