1. 13echo4's Avatar
    I was on the att website looking to buy the 9860. I noticed the internal memory was 2.5-4 gb. Which is it. This is crazy the 9810 has 4gb of memory. So what's up with that?
    11-29-11 02:45 AM
  2. 1magine's Avatar
    it's 4 - but this is for media storage ONLY. Music, video, documents, pics - NOT APPLICATIONS. The Applications are stored on what RIM calls the RAM. On a clean install there will be abpout 200 megs of application space. Because BBOS applications are coded in a type of ancient JAVA and there are few if any OPEN GL games for OS7 devices, 200 megs is considered sufficient.
    11-29-11 05:59 AM
  3. CharlesH's Avatar
    it's 4 - but this is for media storage ONLY. Music, video, documents, pics - NOT APPLICATIONS. The Applications are stored on what RIM calls the RAM. On a clean install there will be abpout 200 megs of application space. Because BBOS applications are coded in a type of ancient JAVA and there are few if any OPEN GL games for OS7 devices, 200 megs is considered sufficient.
    The 512MB of application storage (not RAM, with is something else) has hardware support to prevent unauthorized alteration to the applications and data (such as e-mail) stored there. Part of the emphasis on security. The device storage is for media and the like and is ordinary flash, like the SD card.
    Last edited by CharlesH; 11-29-11 at 01:11 PM.
    11-29-11 01:04 PM
  4. 13echo4's Avatar
    SMH, hard to believe they only put up to 4 gbs on this device and 8gb on the 9810. Oh well thanks guys.
    11-29-11 01:52 PM
  5. DJM626's Avatar
    Not to mention once you start having memory leaks, it disappears rather quickly. They need to double the amount then once you have leaks you will still have half of your memory left
    11-29-11 02:39 PM
  6. CharlesH's Avatar
    Not to mention once you start having memory leaks, it disappears rather quickly. They need to double the amount then once you have leaks you will still have half of your memory left
    There needs to be a distinction between a "leak" (which grows without bound until memory is exhausted), and applications that just grab a lot of memory. For example, Google Maps caches maps in application storage. The browser cache is also in application storage. The Facebook application caches information in application storage. The applications could instead use the device memory or the SD card for these caches, but it seems most don't (I am not familiar with the APIs to do this; maybe it is awkward). These are not leaks. A leak is a programming error where an application loses track of something that it has allocated, and will never access it again, and just keeps allocating new stuff. If an application grabs a lot of memory soon after the phone is restarted, but then doesn't grab any more, that isn't a leak, it's just a memory pig.
    11-30-11 12:57 PM
  7. DJM626's Avatar
    Thank you for clarifying that. I deleted most of my apps and don't use Facebook and any apps that a set to update automatically and I still lose a lot of memory. Call it what you want to call it but its not a good thing no matter how one views it
    11-30-11 02:51 PM
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