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  1. TrioGM's Avatar
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    Default What's the difference between 3G, H and H+?

    I have the STL100-1 and before the 10.1 update I just had H with the double B and now I have 3G, H and H+, all with the double B

    I haven't switched carriers and my carrier doesn't have 4G LTE...



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  2. eldricho's Avatar
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    Check out this site
    It explaint them all from GPRS and up
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  3. Douken's Avatar
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    If your carrier doesn't have LTE, then H+ is the fastest. I have T-Mobile in the US and H+ is the fastest service after LTE

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    Last edited by Douken; 06-04-2013 at 09:11 AM.
  4. TrioGM's Avatar
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    Which site?

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  5. TrioGM's Avatar
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    Thanks douken for the explaining

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  6. Omnitech's Avatar
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    If your carrier is using 3GPP (previously known as GSM) network technology, the high-speed data technology is called "HSPA" and there are different generations and variations of that technology. All of the "H" variants have a higher theoretical maximum data rate compared to any form of "3G".

    If you have the earlier HSPA or HSDPA link active, you will see "H". If you have a higher-speed "HSPA+" link active, you will see the "H+" icon. In general, that means that your data transfer speed can be faster, depending on network conditions. More info on the different variants here:

    High Speed Packet Access - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  7. Phill_UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omnitech View Post
    If you have the earlier HSPA or HSDPA link active, you will see "H". If you have a higher-speed "HSPA+" link active, you will see the "H+" icon.
    You will see what your carrier wants you to see.

    I have HSPA+ but my phone only shows H. I believe only the North American models show H+.
    • That's Phill… with 2 L's
  8. daniel337's Avatar
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    Nope, o2 and T-Mobile also show H+ here in Germany.

    Daniel
    Z10 + PlayBook
  9. Phill_UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniel337 View Post
    Nope, o2 and T-Mobile also show H+ here in Germany.

    Daniel
    I stand corrected then, but I'm pretty sure that was the case with the 9900.

    On Vodafone UK I am definitely getting HSPA+ data speeds, but my Z10 has only ever shown H.
    • That's Phill… with 2 L's
  10. rusco's Avatar
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    Yup, I have also "H+" in local network here (Indonesia). However, some funny things happens with my friend's 9900 BlackBerry (Dakota) which showing "4G" instead of "H+" in other operator network. I wonder whether this is some operator specific setting or generally designed by Blackberry?

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  11. Phill_UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusco View Post
    However, some funny things happens with my friend's 9900 BlackBerry (Dakota) which showing "4G" instead of "H+" in other operator network.
    It always made me chuckle seeing AT&T and TMO-US 9900's showing 4G, when that phone was only ever capable of handling 21mb/s HSPA+ data speeds.

    A clear case of the carrier showing what they want you to see.
    • That's Phill… with 2 L's
  12. Omnitech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phill_UK View Post
    It always made me chuckle seeing AT&T and TMO-US 9900's showing 4G, when that phone was only ever capable of handling 21mb/s HSPA+ data speeds.

    A clear case of the carrier showing what they want you to see.

    You're a bit behind the times. The original ITU-T definition of "4G" was changed when companies like AT&T and Sprint twisted the ITU's arm because they wanted to be able to market their HSPA/HSPA+ or WiMax networks as "4G". The ITU-T caved and changed the definition.

    Actually even 1st-gen LTE is not technically fully 4G compliant using a strict interpretation of the original rules because it cannot achieve 100mbps transfer rate in real-world user scenarios, it just has a maximum 100Mbps raw signaling rate before overhead and communication losses.
  13. Phill_UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omnitech View Post
    You're a bit behind the times. The original ITU-T definition of "4G" was changed when companies like AT&T and Sprint twisted the ITU's arm because they wanted to be able to market their HSPA/HSPA+ or WiMax networks as "4G". The ITU-T caved and changed the definition.

    Actually even 1st-gen LTE is not technically fully 4G compliant using a strict interpretation of the original rules because it cannot achieve 100mbps transfer rate in real-world user scenarios, it just has a maximum 100Mbps raw signaling rate before overhead and communication losses.
    There's no such thing as 4G in the real world... it's nothing more than a North American carrier marketing gimmick!
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  14. Omnitech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phill_UK View Post
    There's no such thing as 4G in the real world... it's nothing more than a North American carrier marketing gimmick!

    4th Generation Wireless Network (or any generation actually) is definitely a real concept and the general concept of these network "generations" are widely used in the industry around the world to distinguish general classes of technology from each other.

    But as far as I know, the first time the tail of the carrier's commercial marketing interests blatantly started wagging the dog of the ITU in terms of actually defining what 2G/3G/4G/etc actually are, was in this latest generation.

    Same thing is happening with ICANN these days. It's become a political circus.
  15. irwindersra's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure that with Rogers, 3G allows for approx 3.2mbps transfer speeds, 4G is approx 7.2mbps, and H+ is approx 21mbps.

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  16. irwindersra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusco View Post
    Yup, I have also "H+" in local network here (Indonesia). However, some funny things happens with my friend's 9900 BlackBerry (Dakota) which showing "4G" instead of "H+" in other operator network. I wonder whether this is some operator specific setting or generally designed by Blackberry?

    Posted via CB10
    I believe 4G is aka H

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  17. oysteinhermansen's Avatar
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    I do not know about US but in Norway (and many other European countries using GSM/UMTS) the operators started quoting HSDPA on speeds above 3.6 mbps. Everything below was called 3G or 3G+ and everything above was H (for HSDPA). As of today they are still using it but when speed exceeds 14.4 mbps they call it H+ (for HSDPA evolved). LTE is described as a new technology having nothing to do with 3G.

    Technically all speeds above standard 3G (384 kbps) are HSDPA. HSDPA uses 16QAM radio wave modulation and support downlink speed up to 14 mbps. For downlink speed from 14.4 mbps and above, they use 64QAM modulation, and this is called HSDPA evolved (or H+). H+ also include the use of MIMI technology with several 16QAM links (like 2x14 => 28 mbps if the operator supports it). LTE is another technology and has nothing to do with HSDPA. It support downlink speed from "low link speed at 4 mbps" and up to 150 mbps (todays version).

    So if the phone are doing it by the book it should show the following.
    3G (for plain 3G)
    H (when a 16QAM modulated link is available, meaning speed from 1 to 14 mbps)
    H+ (when 64QAM or multiple 16QAM modulated links are available, meaning speed from 14.4 to 42 mbps, todays version)
    L (if it uses an LTE link)

    Many phones (like the Apple iPhone) show only E, 3G or 4G. E=GSM Edge, 3G=3G, H and H+, and 4G=LTE. I know that certain phones running WP 7.5/7.8/8.0 do the same thing. Do not know about Android phones. The reason for this being (I was told this by a telco operator once) that the end used really does not care what kind of 3G technology is being used. The end user only need to know if it uses GSM (Edge), 3G (3G, HSDPA) or 4G (LTE technology).

    Hope this was helpful.
  18. Omnitech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oysteinhermansen View Post
    I do not know about US but in Norway (and many other European countries using GSM/UMTS) the operators started quoting HSDPA on speeds above 3.6 mbps. Everything below was called 3G or 3G+ and everything above was H (for HSDPA). As of today they are still using it but when speed exceeds 14.4 mbps they call it H+ (for HSDPA evolved). LTE is described as a new technology having nothing to do with 3G.

    Technically all speeds above standard 3G (384 kbps) are HSDPA. HSDPA uses 16QAM radio wave modulation and support downlink speed up to 14 mbps. For downlink speed from 14.4 mbps and above, they use 64QAM modulation, and this is called HSDPA evolved (or H+). H+ also include the use of MIMI technology with several 16QAM links (like 2x14 => 28 mbps if the operator supports it). LTE is another technology and has nothing to do with HSDPA. It support downlink speed from "low link speed at 4 mbps" and up to 150 mbps (todays version).

    So if the phone are doing it by the book it should show the following.
    3G (for plain 3G)
    H (when a 16QAM modulated link is available, meaning speed from 1 to 14 mbps)
    H+ (when 64QAM or multiple 16QAM modulated links are available, meaning speed from 14.4 to 42 mbps, todays version)
    L (if it uses an LTE link)

    Many phones (like the Apple iPhone) show only E, 3G or 4G. E=GSM Edge, 3G=3G, H and H+, and 4G=LTE. I know that certain phones running WP 7.5/7.8/8.0 do the same thing. Do not know about Android phones. The reason for this being (I was told this by a telco operator once) that the end used really does not care what kind of 3G technology is being used. The end user only need to know if it uses GSM (Edge), 3G (3G, HSDPA) or 4G (LTE technology).

    Hope this was helpful.

    I think what you wrote there is mostly correct, as long as you substitute "HSPA" or "HSPA evolved" for "HSDPA" and "HSDPA evolved" and "MIMO" for "MIMI". Not that I have anything against Mimi.

    HSDPA represented a particular (earlier) generation of the HSPA family of protocols, and pertains only to the download side of the link.

    The wikipedia article I linked earlier shows the relationship of these.
  19. oysteinhermansen's Avatar
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    Agree. I was refering to HSPA. HSPA is HSDPA and HSUPA (Downlink and Uplink), and since I was focusing on downlink I automatically wrote HSDPA. Sorry about that.

    About MIMI - that was wrong. I meant MIMO, but I was looking at my dog when writing, and she is called MIMI :-) Funny how ones mind can sometime play tricks with you....
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  20. Omnitech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oysteinhermansen View Post
    About MIMI - that was wrong. I meant MIMO, but I was looking at my dog when writing, and she is called MIMI :-) Funny how ones mind can sometime play tricks with you....


    Heh, funny!
  21. Mario0678's Avatar
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    About the 'Double B' thing, do you mean the 4 little dots that are grouped together?

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