1. ruhban's Avatar
    I'm doing a small project for university and was wondering if the BIS we used on OS7 could be used in cars for sending and receiving small amounts of important data in a secure environment.

    Also would it be possible for anyone to dumb down BIS for me? I've had a quick look on other threads and websites but I don't think it's getting into my head. Here's one of the websites I've used: How BIS works vs How BlackBerry 10 plans will work with regards to "unlimited" data. - TechSuplex

    Posted via CB10
    08-25-15 04:56 PM
  2. Bla1ze's Avatar
    You really need to move beyond the thinking of BIS.. BIS itself was nothing more than the services provided to BlackBerry devices which essentially used the NOC. The question you should be asking is 'Can the NOC be used in cars?' And yes, it can because the NOC is what made up BIS, through it's routing, security and data compression.
    ruhban likes this.
    08-25-15 05:01 PM
  3. ruhban's Avatar
    Thanks but what's an NOC?

    Posted via CB10
    08-25-15 05:01 PM
  4. Bla1ze's Avatar
    Thanks but what's an NOC?

    Posted via CB10
    Network Operations Center.

    tl;dr: A crap ton of servers that create a network configured in the exact ways that BlackBerry wants them to be. For the sake of simplicity, take every mention of BIS in that article you referenced and pretty much replace it with NOC lol.
    ruhban likes this.
    08-25-15 05:04 PM
  5. ruhban's Avatar
    Thanks again. What made BIS so secure? Cars already have plenty of different ways to connect to the internet but I don't think they're all that secure, especially after the Chrysler hacking stories.

    Posted via CB10
    08-25-15 05:13 PM
  6. Bla1ze's Avatar
    What made BIS so secure?
    'BIS' being secure is... highly debatable. The BlackBerry network (NOC) which made BIS work is the secure part because BlackBerry is in control of it all from top to bottom. You're still thinking of BIS as a core service, it was nothing more than a dumbed-down way of explaining how the NOC worked with BlackBerry devices.

    Basically, BlackBerry bought a bunch of companies, used what they created to offer a compelling package and needed a way to explain this 'service' they were selling to carriers at the time. They couldn't just say 'It uses our NOC', that would go over people's head so they broke things down, explained what the benefits were of using the NOC and called it BlackBerry Internet Service.
    ruhban likes this.
    08-25-15 05:21 PM
  7. Bla1ze's Avatar
    For the sake of your paper or whatever, it's reasonable to say that automotive manu. should could consider using the BlackBerry NOC as a secure means of delivering all things IoT-related to automobiles. It's known for its security, it's known for its stability (aside from a few bumps years ago) and it's proven through many years of service ontop of that, BlackBerry owns several patents on data compression methods which could help alleviate the amount of time it takes to deliver these updates to millions of customers while minmizing the impacts on wireless networks which, even though it might not seem like it in this data centric age, is still an important matter as its costly. Ontop of that, no one wants to be sitting in their driveway waiting for their car to download 5GB of data lol. There's plenty more benefits but what I laid out is pretty simplistic stuff to get you started on thinking.

    Hope that helps.
    ruhban likes this.
    08-25-15 05:38 PM
  8. ruhban's Avatar
    So in order to achieve the same kind of security, a company, say Ford, would have to copy BlackBerry by making their own companies like the ones they bought or was that all just a marketing plot? Or would they have to borrow / lease BlackBerry's NOC? Or are NOCs secure in the first place without all of the complicated jargon?

    Posted via CB10
    08-25-15 05:41 PM
  9. ruhban's Avatar
    For the sake of your paper or whatever, it's reasonable to say that automotive manu. should could consider using the BlackBerry NOC as a secure means of delivering all things IoT-related to automobiles. It's known for its security, it's known for its stability (aside from a few bumps years ago) and it's proven through many years of service ontop of that, BlackBerry owns several patents on data compression methods which could help alleviate the amount of time it takes to deliver these updates to millions of customers while minmizing the impacts on wireless networks which, even though it might not seem like it in this data centric age, is still an important matter as its costly. Ontop of that, no one wants to be sitting in their driveway waiting for their car to download 5GB of data lol. There's plenty more benefits but what I laid out is pretty simplistic stuff to get you started on thinking.

    Hope that helps.
    Thanks for that. I was writing my other post as you uploaded this

    Posted via CB10
    08-25-15 05:42 PM
  10. ruhban's Avatar
    Is there a way I could privately message you for further assistance?
    08-26-15 07:43 PM

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